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  1. Yesterday
  2. Shinylarvitar97

    Deropeltis paulinoi care

    Agree with TJ, they seem to appreciate more moisture for sure. Yeah i keep mine with some vertical pieces of cork bark mainly. They tend to congregate together as nymphs, so they don't need tons of room, but if you want to give them a bit bigger enclosure they should be fine as long as they have easy access to food/moisture. Mine mainly eat apple/fish flake, but that's just my regular roach diets. They develop well with good heat/protein. Not the fastest growing species, but they have fairly steady growth.
  3. Hisserdude

    Deropeltis paulinoi care

    Roachcrossing's recommendation of "dry substrate, high air humidity" makes little sense and is why I lost my sp. "Jinka" culture... Just keep them with a horizontal humidity gradient, one half of the enclosure dry, the other half humid, that's what most people successful with Deropeltis seem to do. D.paulinoi seem to be more moisture loving than other Deropeltis species. They do appreciate good airflow, and Deropeltis do not burrow, so vertical bark slabs or eggflats work best for them.
  4. Last week
  5. mantisfan101

    Deropeltis paulinoi care

    Got it, do these guys burrow at all? Most pics of them seem like they prefer to hide on vertical cork bark slabs. Also, what’s their growth rate and diet like?
  6. Shinylarvitar97

    Deropeltis paulinoi care

    I keep my nymphs a bit more moist with good ventilation. Not a lot of moisture, but a moderate spray once a week does the job for me at least. Depends on your climate. They'll do ok at room temps as nymphs, but heat in the high 70's to 80's seems to boost their growth of course. Some people have success keeping them drier as well with just a wet corner of moss. Also their ootheca need a fair amount of humidity to hatch i believe, but i could be wrong. I had a few ooths dry out on me when I kept them a bit hotter and with the wet corner only as adults. I'm sure this isn't a definite way to keep them, but it worked with me through the 1st generation and doing well with the 2nd.
  7. What’s care like for them? I’m seeing mixed responses regarding temps and humidity, although I think room temps, dry sub but high humidity is best for them
  8. Acro

    Armadillidium hybrids

    Any updates Orin?
  9. Shinylarvitar97

    Male vs. Female nymph examples?

    Here's a comparison. http://imgur.com/a/eUkrQzX
  10. Arthroverts

    Armadillidium hybrids

    Yeah, I noticed these are being sold as well. Does that mean they aren't sterile hybrids? Thanks, Arthroverts
  11. Hisserdude

    Armadillidium hybrids

    Any pictures of these hybrids?
  12. I use lower quality dog food (with grain) for my feeder roaches (they also get fruits, veggies, and other good stuff). For my smaller groups I use high quality Koi pellet food, which seems to be working well. I use fish flakes occasionally but they mix into the substrate, making it harder to determine how much was eaten.
  13. Shinylarvitar97

    Male vs. Female nymph examples?

    I'll try to get a clear shot of the segments on my hissers if I can. It can be a bit difficult with younger nymphs, but if you have a trained eye it can be a bit easier to notice the smaller segments on males. I've done that a lot in the past, and have misidentified females as males. Also hope your lost hisser shows up. I've had hissers escape before, but I've usually found most of the bigger ones. Might just be luck though.
  14. Earlier
  15. I'm trying to sex my G. portentosa nymphs by looking at their abdomenal segments, but I'm struggling. Either all seven of these nymphs are males, or I'm doing something wrong. I see in a lot of close-up pictures of hissing cockroach abdomens, there's a little "tail" after all of the segments, and I'm wondering if I'm confusing that "tail" for a final small segment on some of them, but I can't find any examples specifically of nymphs that outline that. I was hoping someone might be able to post pictures of their own nymphs to show me what to look for on nymphs specifically, so that I can compare that to mine? I tried just getting pictures of mine to upload here, but unfortunately my phone camera really doesn't work well so none of them were clear enough. On top of all of this, I also lost a nymph in this whole process, so now I'm down from my 8 nymph brood to 7, which I'm bummed about. I'm hoping by some miracle I'll be able to find the little guy tomorrow, but I'm not holding my breath. Anyway, thanks in advance for some nymph pics!
  16. Arthroverts

    Arenivaga floridensis "Tampa"

    Fantastic... Thanks for sharing, Arthroverts
  17. Hisserdude

    Sifting coco coir for P. saussurei nymphs

    I just used a dollar store seive/sifter for mine, got it down to a fine enough level for the nymphs. Some people say it doesn't matter, but I suspect those people have a deep substrate in their enclosures, and while the top inch or so may be quite chunky, the bottom layers of substrate are always where the fine material settles down to, and where the small nymphs will stay. My problem was I used quite a chunky mix of not only coconut fiber, but also Zilla "Jungle Mix", and only gave them a couple inches of substrate, so there wasn't enough fine substrate for the smaller nymphs to burrow into.
  18. I've read at least one blog post (Invert Dude) and maybe one or two other places where it is recommended to remove chunky blocks and long fibers from any coco-fiber bedding to be used for Polyphaga saussurei nymphs as it can greatly reduce survivability. (1) How can that be accomplished? (2)What's an acceptable consistency for the coco coir for P. saussurei nymphs? Looking for something I can buy local or construct from upcycled material for the new nymphs I ordered. Thanks.
  19. Shon2

    How to make dried beetles?

    Here are some example pics. If google drive doesn’t work or you need permission, just let me know and I will allow access to whoever wants to look at these This is the box I currently have of drying specimens: https://drive.google.com/file/d/19Aa3JatRtOqxmHqrWx4Kzay-ZIUwa1Yw The two beetles on the right as well as the dubia roach on the bottom left are drying “mummified” style, whereas the wasps, honeybee, and large rhinoceros beetle are drying “plumped” to look more lifelike. I have not started working on either of the butterflies, but just as a note, you cannot dip Lepidoptera in rubbing alcohol, it ruins the quality of their wings (I forgot to mention that in the above post). These beetles have a thick exoskeleton, so only the top of their abdomen has become flattened with the drying process: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hyx_obI1Be3a3uypqvEZ6Ya9lVerkQOH/view?usp=drivesdk https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nVM1orgx13RsA_7S58lCyObXrfPlalIs/view?usp=drivesdk https://drive.google.com/file/d/1VZQcekkKqtLng4DPZ1fpQo0cHMHPgVsp/view?usp=drivesdk This is my shadow box full of finished specimens that are yet to be framed individually: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kgTavagWKMJWO4KANkCSyPpjNELXPWu9/view?usp=drivesdk The dubia roach seen in the top left of the finished box is mummified, and as you can see, they become really flat when finished. They look great from the top and bottom though! Top: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_uaG45rm65_aVHORkNksx7_1WhN2GPtJ/view?usp=drivesdk Side: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1jv-9cUMr3USI7WLfncHfCTswlckpGu5R/view?usp=drivesdk My male hisser has gotten some wear and tear over time (he wasn’t always missing pieces), but I used the fixative method to preserve him and he’s held up well over the course of a few years: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZWpKRljksEkztU5K-zIqoHr8PruFhI9B/view?usp=drivesdk Most other animals in the finished box did not need to be injected with anything to remain nice and full, they all have just soaked for the proper amount of time in rubbing alcohol and have been treated gently during the drying process. Even tiny insects come out nice! https://drive.google.com/file/d/134NXAnqjnIdXGEhSfU4pUig47sCsIbR1/view?usp=drivesdk https://drive.google.com/file/d/15ecrU2uSrok--qYMNnB3aciSNQHtC4tc/view?usp=drivesdk If you are really set on not pinning anything, maybe you can just loosen all of the limbs on your specimens and stick them between two pieces of cardboard to keep them in place? Or directly into the display boxes? I feel like that may lead to them shriveling up again, but it might be worth a try. Again, thank you for your time, and I hope this information helps!
  20. Shon2

    How to make dried beetles?

    Hey y’all! I actually love insect taxidermy and will do my best to help you out! In order to have insects in a display case like the one listed above, pins are still required, they are just removed before the final placement in the cotton-lined boxes seen there. Pinning may not be your desired look, but once your insects are pinned, the pins can easily be removed and your bugs will look magnificent as they are. There are two main preservation looks you can get with pinned insects: 1. Display style - Wings, legs, etc are spread out and posed in order to show the most aesthetically pleasing parts of the animal. A good example would be this: https://www.amazon.com/Beetle-Cicada-Taxidermy-Display-Collectibles/dp/B00K86HTK0 2. Cataloguing style - A pin is put through the animal and nothing is repositioned or spread after that. This is how most researchers chose to keep pinned insects, as it is much easier to keep fragile parts from breaking off and takes up less room in display cases. Here is an example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insect_collecting#/media/File:Beetle_collection.jpg If you would like your specimens to look more catalogue-style, you simply need to soak them in rubbing alcohol (a few hours for smaller insects, 2 days or more for larger ones, and 4 days to a few weeks for specimens that have smelly defense mechanisms because they will stink up your whole house), place them flat over styrofoam, and push an entomology grade pin into their thorax. Getting entomology grade pins are important, because most other pins can cause a breakdown of the specimen over time, and some may even crush the thorax of inverts when pinning. The rubbing alcohol sterilizes the inside and outside of the specimen, and helps excess water evaporate once the animal is dried. If you would like to make more display-style specimens, some precision work is required. Soak your invertebrate in rubbing alcohol (same as you would for catalogue-style), and when they are ready, place them on a piece of styrofoam. Some people use tweezers, but I prefer to use my hands for the next step (I can never tell if I’m pushing or pulling too hard with tweezers). Use tweezers/ your fingers to gently pull the legs of your specimen away from the body, massaging each joint flat. You may hear a popping or cracking sound on larger animals when you do this, it’s nothing to worry about. Once the desired limbs are softened, place your insect back down on the styrofoam and push a pin through the thorax. Use pins to gently pull the legs out from underneath the insect and position them along the styrofoam. Place pins on either side of the legs to keep them in place, but do not pierce the legs themselves, they will fall apart once the specimen is dried. Here is an example of what this will look like: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/289145238560749865/ If you would like to display your animals with the wings spread, gently use a pin to lift the wing cases off the body and position them with pins as well once they’re loose. This can take some practice and they may break off if you are too rough (if that happens, just use a dab of superglue, it’s easy to hide). Pinning the wings themselves may take some time, as they are the most difficult part to flatten and pose, in my opinion. You can choose to pose the wings: 1. Above the head (it’s a more unnatural position, but some people like it), 2. With the wings and wings cases horizontal with the body 3. Or with the wings poised downward and the wing cases horizontal (this is the easiest for beginners) Once the wings are lifted off the body, you are left with a decision - Do I want the abdomen to remain plump, or have more or a mummified look? This is purely an aesthetic decision and will not affect how your specimen ages over time. The mummified look is popular with curiosity shops and collectors that favor antique specimens, but a plump abdomen makes the animal look and feel more alive. To maintain this, fill a syringe with rubbing alcohol or formalin, and inject it into the abdomen via the anal duct. If the insect is too full of guts to get a comfortable amount of fluid in it, you may have to drain some of the inner fluids out of the animal first before injections are administered. For softer specimens like hissing cockroaches and large beetles, injecting the abdomen with rubbing alcohol is a necessary step, unless you want to spray your specimen down with a clear fixative (like the kind used for acrylic paintings). Spraying it down is definitely easier, but you must be sure to cover the entire animal, otherwise it will deflate and possibly rot over time. Once all of the limbs are laid out how you would like to see them arranged, all you have to do now is wait. For plumped specimens, I let them dry a few days before framing, and for mummified ones, I just wait until the specimen looks fully dried out. If it starts to rot or mold while drying (it shouldn’t, but it happens), soak some paper towels in rubbing alcohol, drape them over the rotted parts, and wait for the mold to die. Then let the drying process begin again. I will post some examples of all of the mentioned methods soon, but for now, I really hope this helps! Insect taxidermy is addictive and fun, it’s hard not to take home dead bugs when I find them out and about now that I know how easy it is to preserve them, haha. Wet specimens are also an option too, but I’ve never tried that, so I can’t tell you where to begin! If you want to feel like a mad scientist with liquid jars full of insects in your home, feel free to research that on your own. It can look beautiful in its own way, but not what most people are looking for. I would love to see your results when you’re gonna attempt this again
  21. Allpet Roaches

    forum problems

    Maybe they're hoping you'll write them a PM and they'll get an e-mail so they don't need to check in unless someone posts on their ad. 99.9% of customers send a PM and the ones that post on the ad historically don't come through. If you sent them a PM then I have no answer for you.
  22. Allpet Roaches

    sp. cubaris

    I started with some normal duckies and a lot of them are blonde but you can't always tell because they are pale until they get big and can look blonde when young even if they aren't.
  23. Cariblatta lutea

    Arenivaga floridensis "Tampa"

    These were collected from Tampa, FL. They have similar color to Ocala strain, but adult females develop yellow spots on the margin of their abdomen.
  24. Alright, thanks guys. I'll keep 'em separated to be safe. Guess it's time for another bin if I wanna breed the Halloweens, then.
  25. Considering how messed up hobby Hisser species are, I strongly recommend not keeping any two different species together, even if they themselves are already hybrids. Thanks, Arthroverts
  26. I'd think hybrid offspring between the two genera would look pretty weird and it'd be easy to tell if they did so... You're probably safe to keep them together TBH, but I personally wouldn't risk it.
  27. @Hisserdude Thanks for the response! If I did keep them together, would there be a way to tell that they'd hybridized so I could cull the line / separate, or would it be too hard to tell? Really was hoping they'd not be able to so I could breed them both in the same bin and avoid having two roach colonies in my closet, but I also don't want to muddy the Halloween lines if I ever actually end up selling bugs.
  28. Poultry Feed has DL Methionine in it....a "green" pesticide patented by the university of Florida. It targets insects with an alkaline gut physiology including mosquitos. termites, larvae like caterpillars, and our beloved cockroach amongst others. Its been sprayed on stored grain for years to control pests. Its used to increase protein levels making meatier and faster growing birds.... Patent Link
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