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  2. Hisserdude

    Salutations from the 51st US State: Confusion

    Where exactly do you live? Technically most roaches in the continental US shouldn't be legal to keep, but since they are kept by so many people, with many species having been bred for years and years, the USDA doesn't bother enforcing said laws anywhere except FL. You generally won't encounter trouble with keeping roaches in the US unless you go looking for it, and I don't know of anyone who's had the USDA knock on their door to confiscate their roaches, (whereas phasmids, exotic Orthopterans and exotic beetles are MUCH more strictly regulated).
  3. I have yet to post introduction posts on a couple of forums. I have this bad habit of just jumping right into discussions, so before I go too far in this form, greetings! I chose my title because I thought it was funny; I do not think of myself as confused (most of the time), and one of my favorite childhood movies was Charlotte's Web. I keep a number of roaches right now. I started several years ago with the classic hissers, and I managed to kill my small starter colony. I tried again, and now I have hundreds. After several failed attempts, a few of which were impressive, of breeding crickets, I started culturing feeder roaches. Due to the size of my pets, I did not want the standard Blaptica dubia, so I pursued Panchlora nivea and Nauphoeta cinerea. Well -- Panchlora nivea fly, a lot! Therefore, I never used them much as feeders because I never wanted to have the tank opened for more than a few seconds. They were pretty though, and some roach-haters actually liked my "leaf roaches." I tried the N. cinerea, and they worked well. I also acquired adults of Blaberus giganteus, and I soon had dozens of nymphs. Then, in my quest to understand the regulations on exotic mantids and beetles, I learned about the USDA regulations on roaches, and all my roaches, except G. portentosa, were illegal. Therefore, I gave them to a museum and pursued the proper permits. I acquired more lobster roaches from Josh's Frogs as they have the proper commercial biological supply permits. I submitted permit applications for many species of cockroaches. Permits for some of those species were recently granted! I now have the USDA permits for Therea petiveriana, Blatta lateralis, Rhyparobia maderae, and a number of others. Unfortunately, Blaberus giganteus was not one of the approved species, and I was told that they require a containment facility. I currently have Gromphadorhina portentosa (200+), Nauphoeta cinerea (a lot), and Rhyparobia maderae (2).
  4. Yeah, none of the Pseudoglomeris (formerly Corydidarum) can curl up into balls, Perisphaerus is now the only roach genus that can.
  5. Allpet Roaches

    Approved Common Names - American Cockroach Society

    That is disappointing, they look like they have the body structure for it.
  6. Actually looking back, we weren't quite able to reach a verdict on Gil's thread as to the preffered name for Lanxoblatta rudis, but later when I created a photo thread for the species the conversation was reignited, which is when we reached the conclusion to call them the "rough bark roach".
  7. Well we all generally agreed on Gil's thread on this species that rough bark roach should be the name, as "rudis" translates to rough or coarse in Latin. Well they don't curl up at all, so I'd save the "Pillbug" moniker for Perisphaerus species, not Pseudoglomeris. Emerald or Magnificent Emerald roach would work better. Thorax is being bred by several people in Europe, and at least one of my US buddies has them, (but he'll likely need a new group later this year). They are kinda finicky like Rhabdoblatta formosana, but they are about as established in the hobby as they are, if not more so... Perhaps that should be the name for improcera then, it hardly does the appearance justice, and there are several little Eurycotis, but if that's literally what improcera means, that's what we should go with! Well the only person I've seen give grossei a common name was Kyle, and he used Mega glowspot. Not as cheesy as his other common names, so I'd just use that since more people are familiar with that name ATM... Yup, the little Kenyans have been tentatively I'd as P.minutissima, that's apparently the Paraplecta species they match the best according to Dominic Evangelista.
  8. Yesterday
  9. Allpet Roaches

    Approved Common Names - American Cockroach Society

    Thanks Hisserdude. Wouldn't Lanxoblatta be better off as bark mimic, rough bark doesn't do any justice to it's properties. Pseudoglomeris magnifica = Wouldn't Emerald pillbug roach be more descriptive? Is Thorax in the hobby? improcera means little I thing mega sounds like Megablocks or Megatron and giant is simpler. Comments ? Do you mean 115 for Paraplecta? I identified them to Paraplecta some years back but I forget which species.
  10. Arthroverts

    New Invertebrate Club in Southern California!

    The meeting is upon us! Who is coming? I have got a few creatures I might be bringing depending on the demand, and I am curious to hear how everyone's collections are doing! Thanks, Arthroverts
  11. And for common names, Hormetica apolinari (Apolinar's horned roach) Lanxoblatta rudis (Rough bark roach) Pseudoglomeris magnifica (Magnificent emerald roach?) Thorax porcellana (Vampire roach?) Eurycotis improcera (Ornate scrub roach?) Compsodes schwarzi (Schwarz's hooded roach) Latiblattella rehni (Rhen's palm roach) Lucihormetica grossei (Mega glowspot roach)
  12. Just some scientific name changes: Eucorydia aenea dasytoides is now considered it's own species, (so the proper name is E.dasytoides) Euthlastoblatta gemma was changed to Aglaopteryx gemma Both Cariblatta lutea and minima are their own species now Corydidarum pygmaea is now Perisphaerus pygmaeus Paraplecta sp. "Kenya" has been tentatively ID'd as Paraplecta minutissima, tentative ID confirmed by taxonomist Dominic Evangelista. Also, apparently the "Symploce macroptera" in the hobby are actually S.incuriosa according to Dominic Evangelista. And numbers 87 and 138 are both Latiblattella lucifrons BTW, and it appears you've given two different common names...
  13. Last week
  14. Allpet Roaches

    Approved Common Names - American Cockroach Society

    144. Panchlora sp. "speckled" = Speckled Banana Cockroach The common name list will be open to additions and suggestions for updates. The number and common name generally will not change, but scientific name changes and new species or subspecies can be added as they become established in culture. Suggestions will be incorporated (or not), then deleted. LOOKING FOR UPDATES- post below
  15. Allpet Roaches

    Isopod Hobby

    Can you provide the name of the book and the author, maybe include a quote from the text?
  16. Betta132

    Porcellio expansus

    Oh, cool! Do you have any care advice for them?
  17. Betta132

    Isopod Hobby

    Well, how do you define the isopod hobby? Did it start when someone started keeping them? Did it start when a kid first traded some of their isopods to someone else? With the first person who had multiple different kinds? If a kid goes into their yard and picks up some isopods to keep, are they an isopod hobbyist? Does it have to involve communication from others to count?
  18. Looking right now 😦 Thank you very much @varnon, it is a great contribution!! ...and a topic in which I'm particularly interested...
  19. Allpet Roaches

    Porcellio expansus

    Porcellio expansus has been the most sought after species for a while. They grow very large for a terrestrial isopod (many times the biggest most people see in their back yards) and older males have extremely long uropods. There are two different forms, one where the "skirt" (margin of the pronotum) is light orange and one where the skirt is yellow. Porcellio succinctus looks similar but the skirt is white.
  20. Allpet Roaches

    Isopod Hobby

    The original post asked when the "isopod hobby" started, not when the first human kept a wild isopod as a pet. I imagine that could have been ten thousand years ago, give or take all of history. There may be centurions alive today who kept an isopod when they were five. I believe I understood the question of the original poster but maybe your answer is the one requested.
  21. Allpet Roaches

    I Need Help/Advice, Dying Halloween Hissers

    The mites are slightly beneficial but you can remove them with some effort and patience.
  22. Allpet Roaches

    Simandoa Conserfariam behaving weird

    The problem with hanging up near the lid is you can smash one on accident during routine care.
  23. Allpet Roaches

    Rotting wood

    This depends on exactly what you're feeding it to. Many roaches will eat the most rotten parts but cannot eat anything that isn't well decayed.
  24. Dr. Darby Proctor, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Florida Institute of Technology has recently started using cockroaches to teach principles of psychology and neuroscience. Article and video below: https://adastra.fit.edu/blog/research/florida-tech-discovery-magazine-spring-2019-buggin-out/ I met Darby at a conference last week, were we were both presenting some of our cockroach research. The conference was near her school, so she actually was able to bring some of her discoid cockroaches! It was my first time seeing discoids in person. I now have "other roach envy." I know a number of labs that are investigating using hissing cockroaches for similar work, but generally I find them too lethargic. I have made some good progress with my research as well, and just received a grant to continue the work, though I do not yet have any fun videos to show yet.
  25. Longhorn1234

    Rotting wood

    How should rotting wood feel to the touch? I've read on other forums that good rotting wood should be white to pale yellow and easily crumble. I found a log that meet those requirements but it also feels "spongy" and soft. Is that normal or should it be hard to the touch but still crumble?
  26. I just purchased a 2 1/2' retired ''STUD'' 'dragon who eats his fruits & veggies ok but loves his bugs. Crickets, horned worms super worms I just bought some dubias to try. The employee warned me about them playing opossum when they sense danger. I hope he takes to them, any movement he pounces! Our 1yr. old male veiled cham devours anything moving near him. I'm assuming the dubias will need to be tong fed due to lack of movement.
  27. Arthroverts

    New Invertebrate Club in Southern California!

    O.K everyone, the next meeting is going to be on April 27th (Saturday), 10:00 to 11:00-11:30 AM at the Arlington Garden in Pasadena, 275 Arlington Dr, Pasadena, CA 91105. I look forward to seeing whoever can make it! Thanks, Arthroverts
  28. and here is what I'm currently seeing in the container:
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