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  2. Allpet Roaches

    Thank you for accepting me into the forum.

    I asked because they seem to have a larger and wider appetite than those species and could possibly work better for your purposes.
  3. Twilightroach

    Virgin Red runner observation.

    That is very interesting.
  4. How long does it take red runner ootheca to hatch normally? I know it probably depends on temperatures and humidity right? But how long would it take them to hatch with temperatures in 65-69 degrees? And also what is the maximum time I would expect an ootheca to hatch or still be viable? Like how long should I wait until the ootheca can be regarded as not going to hatch or non viable?
  5. Hisserdude

    Bantua sp. "Namibia"

    At least five babies were born a few days ago, (the 10th to be exact), apparently smaller brood sizes of half a dozen are normal for the females' first litters, their subsequent litters are normally in the 10-15 range, (this based off data collected from four other breeders of this species). Fingers crossed more litters are on their way! 馃馃榿
  6. Hisserdude

    Help!

    Hisser adults can live for two to three years, but the longest lived ones are individuals that are not breeding and have plenty of space. Overcrowded, breeding adults are lucky to live half as long.
  7. Hisserdude

    Happy New Year!

    True, but I think in terms of species that have seen long term success in captivity, we're catching up. Yeah there's certainly good people in both those hobbies, it's just hard to find them at times among the throngs of greedy vendors, stubborn groupies and jerks that "popularity" of a hobby and it's more prominent members can bring with it... 馃槄
  8. Daniel Pat贸n

    Thank you for accepting me into the forum.

    Not really. My experience is only with Eublaberus spp "ivory", Blaptica dubia and Aeluropoda insignis.
  9. Allpet Roaches

    Thank you for accepting me into the forum.

    Nice to have you! Did you try Gromphadorhina portentosa?
  10. Shannon

    Help!

    Thank you both for the feedback! I do not use organic and hadn't even thought of that so I will definitely make sure I peel things at the very least from now on. I don't think it's the heat lamp as I have been using the same ones since Sept. They are night vision ones so the light is low and the enclosure always stay at about 80 so I think that is ok for now, but thanks for that suggestion as well. They all came to me as full size adults from my science curriculum company - so I have no idea how old they actually were other than "adult." For some reason I thought the life span was longer - good to know. I need them to last me about another month fro my class and then I have a friend that is going to take them and raise them so I'm hoping to not lose any more. Thank you both again!
  11. Shannon

    Help!

    Thank you both for the feedback! I do not use organic and hadn't even thought of that so I will definitely make sure I peel things at the very least from now on. I don't think it's the heat lamp as I have been using the same ones since Sept. They are night vision ones so the light is low and the enclosure always stay at about 80 so I think that is ok for now, but thanks for that suggestion as well. They all came to me as full size adults from my science curriculum company - so I have no idea how old they actually were other than "adult." For some reason I thought the life span was longer - good to know. I need them to last me about another month fro my class and then I have a friend that is going to take them and raise them so I'm hoping to not lose any more. Thank you both again!
  12. Dear colleagues: My name is Daniel Pat贸n and I am a professor of Ecology at the University of Extremadura (Spain). I teach two subjects Environmental Biotechnology and Experimental Techniques in Ecology. My specialization is the analysis of environmental data. I am interested in invertebrate composites such as isopods, worms, mealworms, soldier flies and of course cockroaches. We touch on these topics in my classes, but I have a lot to learn. I can bring knowledge of applied statistics and interdisciplinary training. 1. Do you currently raise any roaches? I currently care for three species of cockroaches: Eublaberus spp. "ivory", Aeluropoda insignis and Blaptica dubia. My main interest is the degradation of waste for composting. 2. If so, how many? I have several terrariums with hundreds of animals. I also have soldier flies (Hermetia illucens), mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) and two species of worms (Dendrobaena veneta and Eisenia fetida). I dedicate them to research and practical classes with my Environmental Biotechnology students. 3. Do you culture roaches as pets or feeders? I am mainly interested in degrading waste and generating compost 4. If feeders, what kinds? I'm interested in finding the species that degrades the most, doesn't require a lot of temperature, doesn't fly, is easy to handle and is not invasive. Some of these concepts are contradictory, but I'm still looking. So far Eublaberus and Aleuropoda are winning. 5. Are there any specific roach questions that you would like to ask the community? Yes, I would like to know which species would be suitable to set up a waste degradation centre in a place where the winter temperature does not usually go below 32 F (0潞C) zero degrees outside and reaches 113 F (45潞C) in summer. I suppose that in well-insulated buildings it would not be very expensive to heat. I am interested in the fact that the species is not invasive, although I understand that those that escape would die in winter. 6. How did you find our community? Asking experts like Kyle Kandilian, they told me about this excellent forum. It's not easy to find in searches, at least from Europe it didn't come up. I think it is a perfect forum, very well structured, clear and simple. Extremely useful Greetings **************************************************************************** Daniel Pat贸n Numerical Ecology. Ecology Unit Department of Plant Biology, Ecology and Earth Sciences Faculty of Sciences. University of Extremadura Avda. Elvas s/n 06071 Badajoz (Spain) https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2500-3964 https://cvn.fecyt.es/0000-0003-2500-3964 http://unex.academia.edu/DanielPatonDominguez https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Daniel_Paton/ http://sites.google.com/site/numericalecologyuex/home ****************************************************************************
  13. Peter Clausen

    Arizona Inverts

    Thanks a bunch, Arthroverts! 馃憤
  14. Earlier
  15. Arthroverts

    Happy New Year!

    @Hisserdude, I think it'll be a while before we get as big as Europe in terms of size. They've had the jump on us for decades and are still going full throttle, ha ha. A sure shame it is when that happens; if you keep your eyes open and your head on straight you'll find a lot of good people in both the isopod and tarantula sides of the hobby, but you are right, a lot of irresponsible sellers and hobbyists to waylay the new enthusiast and old hand alike. Thanks, Arthroverts
  16. Hisserdude

    Bantua sp. "Namibia"

    The offspring from that first, small litter have started maturing, took them only about 3 months and a week... Here's one of the new adult females:
  17. Hisserdude

    Happy New Year!

    Yeah, I don't know quite how it exploded in the way that it did, but boy did that community become greedy and toxic fast, (like the T hobby). More good blatticulturists would always be nice, if we could get the hobby as big here as it is in Europe, that'd be fine by me... Anyways, something tells me 2020 is gonna be a good year for the hobby in terms of new additions! 馃槈
  18. Matttoadman

    Help!

    How large were they? I have found that no species of roach lives too long after they reach their final molt. Anywhere 3 months to maybe a year for some species. And males lifespans are shorter than females.
  19. BlattaAnglicana

    Help!

    The only thing I can think of if there's no obvious physical cause of death is that there might have been residual pesticides on the food. Do you use organic fruit and veg to feed them? And if not do you wash and preferably peel the fruit and veg? I would certainly give that a try (I also peel and wash organic food as well just to be double sure!) if you aren't already doing so. If you are already feeding them organic food the only other possibility is perhaps the heat lamp is too close and hot for them? I use a heat mat (with a thermostat to control temperature) on my roach enclosures rather than a lamp, as the heat they produce is very gentle and won't overheat the enclosure, as long as you use a mat that is appropriately sized for the tank.
  20. Shannon

    Help!

    I have had two hissing cockroaches die within the last two days. I am brand new to hissing roaches and am not sure what I am doing wrong. These are a part of my classroom science curriculum but I am planning on keeping them as classroom pets. I have the males and females in separate aquariums. They have the proper dirt, and heat lamps, and enclosures. I feed them apples, carrots, bread, leafy greens, celery, etc. I also water them with cubes or gel. The two that passed away did not seem to have anything physically wrong with them that I would see. Any ideas??
  21. Matttoadman

    green banana roaches

    On an opposite note, I remember when I use to provide pest control for a penitentiary. The basement of the facility was where al the access to the plumbing and electrical areas were. It was a constant 90 degrees and the humidity was equally as high. There were massive colonies of American roaches living there. The building was supported by concrete pillars and they would hang on these like herds of sheep. Moving as a group (not scattering)if you shown a flash light on them. The interesting thing is this area was lit 24/7. The did not hang out in the dim areas. We sprayed once a week and there were never in dead to be found. I almost think they lived solely off the dead we created. So it appears once roaches get used to a particular light cycle it is of little matter to them.
  22. Arthroverts

    Happy New Year!

    @Hisserdude, well, the isopod side of the hobby still kinda confounds me, how it just exploded onto the scene and became the next big thing. However, more people=more demand=more species become available. That's not always true of course, but more responsible blatticulturists is always a good thing. Thanks, Arthroverts
  23. varnon

    What would you find?

    I found lots of wood roaches growing up. A few years ago, I found pale bordered field roach in my yard. I was not able to contain it or find another.
  24. Hisserdude

    Happy New Year!

    I retract my belated Happy New Year's wishes for you... 馃槀 Species, yes, people, meeeeh... A couple more keepers here and there wouldn't hurt, don't love what happened to the isopod community when it's members started numbering in the several hundreds... now thousands...
  25. Hisserdude

    Darkling Beetle Photo Thread

    Yeah that's a possibility too, all depends on what species you have basically... 馃槄
  26. Allpet Roaches

    Darkling Beetle Photo Thread

    Some Eleodes larvae eat other Eleodes so you may just end up with one species.
  27. Arthroverts

    Happy New Year!

    Here's to hoping that the hobby will see an explosion of both species available and people coming into the hobby, you know we need it, ha ha. Thanks, Arthroverts
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