Betta132

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About Betta132

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  1. Sarracenia pitchers eventually die if they become clogged with insects, but the plant stays healthy and regrows pitchers, and it gains more energy from the insects than it loses by having a pitcher die. They're made to deal with occasional swarms of insects coming through.
  2. Carnivorous plants need to be kept in peat or sphagnum and given rainwater or distilled water, they can't stand minerals. They also mostly need very bright lights. Sundews and pinguicula love gnats, but only catch the gnats that stray out and bump them. Speaking from experience, they don't have enough catching power to wipe out an infestation, though I do have a pinguicula on a living wall that keeps the very low gnat population from ever increasing. Not good gnat control, but neat plants.
  3. I love the pantanals! Do they do much of anything, or just sit there looking nice?
  4. I had a peat substrate kill off some roaches, not sure what happened. It retains more moisture than you really want for roaches, also. It's OK for amphibians, but coco fiber is better as a substrate, and also better for the environment- peat is dug out of old bogs and takes a long time to renew, while coco fiber comes from coconut shells and is a byproduct of everything that uses coconut interiors.
  5. That's definitely good to know. Aside from the sealant issue, how do you find it? Is it a good size and shape to work with? I've been eyeing them, they look like a really nice size.
  6. I feel like the way to settle this would be to have everyone who has adults of one species or the other measure them, either in millimeters or in weight, and post the sizes.
  7. Some people try to remove stuck sheds on every animal species that sheds. With a few very specific exceptions, it's a bad idea, but the intent is good. In that case, I'd say you need to mist more.
  8. Keeping the humidity up should help him, but that's about all you can do. Definitely don't try to pull anything off him, just leave him alone.
  9. Those are pretty durable, they should be OK. Just have some food and water ready for them when they arrive.
  10. Our house is really old and has no insulation in the walls, all sorts of bugs come into the walls for winter. My guess is a couple of eggcases ended up in there from adult roaches, plus a few others found their way in. Maybe they smelled the food in there and wanted in? At any rate, most of them are out now, and I can hopefully catch the rest when I renovate the enclosure. I just can't believe there were so many in the goat skull. They weren't the only ones, either, that's where my peppered roach adult hangs out. And he's several square inches of occupied space on his own!
  11. If they were packed well, they have a chance, especially if the seller sent them with some snack food. What species are they?
  12. Alright, I'll forego the sand. I can probably get a more scrubby/desert look without sand anyway. There aren't very many domino roaches right now, so I think I'll let them multiply further before I try to introduce anything else. When I do, I think I'll try a handful of herbivorous darklings, they seem like a good bet.
  13. Cypress repels insects, definitely don't use it. It's too coarse, anyway. Without knowing exactly what roaches you're getting, I'd recommend coco fiber. It's made from shredded coconut shells, and it's very soft, fine-grained, and good for a wide variety of burrowing insects. If you don't have it when your roaches come in, just give them some crumpled, lightly damp paper towels to hide under, that'll hold them over.
  14. That's about what I was picturing. Sandy soil with more organic matter than straight sand, leaf litter piled into crevices, fairly hot and dry but not terribly so. We have that sort of environment in Texas, and a lot of bugs seem to do really well in it. Oh, I like the look of those guys, especially the Adesmia. Do they need a rotting piece of wood, or just a piece that's kept damp? Also, where would I potentially get some? What about desert millipedes? I don't think I'd be able to breed them, but they live a long time, so that's OK.
  15. They're absolutely gorgeous! Is their care any different/more difficult than the other Gyna?