Skyvie

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About Skyvie

  • Rank
    Eggcase

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Georgia
  • Interests
    Just about everything
  1. The one I mentioned is usually at stores like Home Depot. Here's the link for Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00SPNHDQS/ref=cm_sw_r_em_apa_JNBizbT0T44D1 And Home Depot: http://m.homedepot.com/p/DR-EARTH-24-oz-Ready-to-Use-Yard-and-Garden-Insect-Killer-8003/205825639 It's probably best to run to the store to grab one...shipping may be expensive for what it is.
  2. "Natural" or "Pet safe" or "Pesticide free" insect killers only have essential oils in them (rosemary, thyme, peppermint, etc) which do a good job of repelling insects without the "Raid" insect poisons with pyrethrins in them. I've got one called Dr. Earth Pure & Natural, but there are many to choose from with similar pesticide-free ingredients. Just make sure your other "pet" insects aren't in the same room, or they may get upset or worse
  3. Wikipedia says, "The adults can often be found in shrubbery, trees, and plants. The young can be found under logs and other debris," so yeah, both trees and leaves & stuff. One note: they fly really well, so they aren't guaranteed live really close to your house
  4. Don't know about Texas, but here in GA near Tennessee I see them occasionally at night in the summer. They're not *supposed* to come up this far, but looks like a few individuals have made it and their colony comes back alive each year. I haven't seen more than one at a time, so my chances of starting my own colony aren't real high right now
  5. 0 replies? Oh man, no hisser love! Well, that's exciting to see the "journey" from beginning to adulthood! Hissers are pretty big, so each step is quite noticeable, too. Sounds like the "big man" will be nice and happy to have the whole place to himself! Congrats!
  6. Well, there's likely many "pest" species (german, American, Oriental). A quick web search brings up: Periplaneta fuliginosa (smoky brown) Parcoblatta americana (Western wood roach) There's probably more, but so far the most "native" roach looks like Parcoblatta americana (not to be confused with Periplaneta americana).
  7. Welcome back! Wow, you still have quite a collection; it must've been quite large! Since you have such a well-rounded collection, do you plan on specializing in something or adding something difficult or very rare? If so, what would that be? I hope your interest continues to be strong and you enjoy continual positive experiences!
  8. This is so interesting! I wonder what happened with the common ancestor and how the different species "found" their respective zones. Wow, deep stuff!
  9. Two weeks isn't too long to wait for something like that! Congrats, there's nothing like it!
  10. More neat stuff! It's like Christmas for you! I guess sand is too abrasive for the sand roaches, so you're using coco fiber or something similar?
  11. Wow, these aren't even on his website - I wonder if they will be soon. These guys look pretty neat when they're adults...almost like a Lucihormetica, but not quite. Eurycotis are some of my favorites
  12. Ah, the "fuzzy" roach - I've had my eye on these. I'm looking forward to future pics of growth & development!
  13. Yeah, I was just havin' a little fun - I wonder if the kits offer the right chemical for the roaches to glow. Hmmm. I guess we'll never know because it seems that most people with Lucihormetica are like me: They just enjoy these beauties without needing the glow!
  14. Lol, yeah, Hisserdude, raise the 'shrooms to get the spots glowing - that should be really easy to do... Let's see...foxfire mushrooms gathered before a storm or during wet weather (Wikipedia)? Check. Four old decaying hardwood tree stumps and/or logs? Check. High humidity enclosures? Check. Get rid of roach collection because 'shrooms are taking up all extra time? Check. Sign up for counseling because shrooms didn't ever glow? Check. Awesome suggestion, Craniifer, though I don't think most of us are mycologists. It would be wicked cool, however, if someone actually lived in an area where these things grow and could say "Yea" or "Nay" for their effect on luminance in captivity, but.... Maybe we should find volunteers??
  15. Totally awesome! Good luck with them; they definitely look worth the effort