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Found 6 results

  1. I will be getting 5 new roach species in to the US hobby in a month or less from the UK. They will all be adults, so establishing a culture hopefully will take less time but it will be some time before they are distributed in the hobby. I will also be getting 3 species of exotic roaches that are not to common in the hobby, one of which is the rhino roach which I already have for sale. i will let you guys drool over these 5 new species and 3 other rare species I will be getting I will update this thread tomorrow with scientific names and a description of each roach, i will post pics when I get these species in the US. please feel free to make assumptions of what species i may be importing, if you guess correctly I will give you a free starter culture of that species in particular (the genus and name must be correct, spelling doesn't matter this does not apply to the 3 species that are already in the hobby just the 5 new species.) I will just say that one of the species is absolutely stunning, once I get them I will be the second person in the world to have them! post away!
  2. Hi, Frank Indiviglio here. I’m a herpetologist and book author, recently retired from a career spent at several zoos, aquariums, and museums, including over 20 Various land crabs have long been available in the pet trade, but despite their brilliant colors and fascinating behaviors, few have caught on among terrarium keepers here in the USA. This changed a bit when several spectacularly-colored species, usually sold as Vampire Crabs or Red Devils, began showing up in the early 2000’s. Recent investigations into the natural history of these crabs resulted in the surprising finding that two species new to science have been kept and bred by hobbyists for at least 10 years! http://bit.ly/1Gfhr5k Please also check out my posts on Twitter http://bitly.com/JP27Nj and Facebook http://on.fb.me/KckP1m My Bio, with photos of animals I’ve been lucky enough to work with: http://bitly.com/LC8Lbp Best Regards, Frank
  3. Hi, Frank Indiviglio here. I’m a herpetologist, zoologist, and book author, recently retired from a career spent at several zoos, aquariums, and museums, including over 20 with the Bronx Zoo. The discovery of a new frog is always an exciting event, but the species revealed in this month’s issue of Zoo Keys is especially so. The colorful, entirely-aquatic Telmatobius ventriflavum was found in a small stream along a major highway 3,900 feet up in the Peruvian Andes. It is related to a unique group of frogs, the best known being the bizarre, “push-up performing” Lake Titicaca Frog (Telmatobius culeus). I was fascinated by the huge, baggy-skinned Lake Titicaca Frogs resident at the Bronx Zoo (the only ones in captivity) as a child – and due to their 30 year lifespans, I was lucky enough to work with those same individuals once I began my zoo-keeping career! (Please see the article linked below for more on this amazing frog). The Lake Titicaca Frog’s newly-discovered relative promises to be just as interesting – and, it seems, is similarly threatened with extinction. Read the rest of this article here http://bit.ly/1ALvTld Please also check out my posts on Twitter http://bitly.com/JP27Nj and Facebook http://on.fb.me/KckP1m My Bio, with photos of animals I’ve been lucky enough to work with: http://bitly.com/LC8Lbp Best Regards, Frank
  4. Hi, Frank Indiviglio here. I’m a herpetologist, zoologist, and book author, recently retired from a career spent at several zoos, aquariums, and museums, including over 20 years with the Bronx Zoo While working at the Bronx Zoo, I had the good fortune to breed Kihansi Spray Toads – an endangered species that gives birth to fully-formed toadlets – and the amazing skin-brooding Surinam Toad. Yet these are but two examples of the amazing diversity of odd frog breeding strategies, none of which resemble what might be called “normal” frog behavior! Among the world’s 6,400+ frog species, we find tadpoles that eat bark, their mother’s eggs and even their father’s skin, along with parents that carry eggs or young in skin pouches, vocal sacs and even stomachs. None, however, were known to give birth to live tadpoles. As you’ll see below, a herpetologist’s extremely lucky catch, at just the right moment, changed that recently – one can only guess at what will come next! http://bit.ly/1w4wJ3Q Please also check out my posts on Twitter http://bitly.com/JP27Nj and Facebook http://on.fb.me/KckP1m My Bio, with photos of animals I’ve been lucky enough to work with: http://bitly.com/LC8Lbp Best Regards, Frank
  5. Hi, Frank Indiviglio here. I’m a herpetologist, zoologist, and book author, recently retired from a career spent at several zoos, aquariums, and museums, including over 20 years with the Bronx Zoo I always advise young students intent on reaching fame to study invertebrates…uncounted millions remain to be discovered, even in such unlikely places as Manhattan’s Central Park (a centipede, in recent years). Almost every week, an exciting new insect, arachnid, crustacean, or other invertebrate is uncovered, and some of those found in 2014 have been especially surprising. Included among this year’s amazing finds are “living skeletons”, see-through snails, gymnastic spiders, and screaming-pink millipedes. Most have barely been studied, while others were found earlier but are only now being described in detail. The following discoveries represent just the tip of the “new species iceberg”…please be sure to post your own favorites below. My Bio, with photos of animals I’ve been lucky enough to work with: http://bitly.com/LC8Lbp Best Regards, Frank
  6. This discovery is several years old now, but seems not to have drawn much attention. Thought folks here might enjoy the article; some notes on roach diversity included also, best, Frank: http://bit.ly/1rqHV8P
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