blatta70

Blattidae/Blattellidae indentification

4 posts in this topic

Hello, this is Mark. I am interested to know what the main identifying factors between the roach families Blattidae and Blattellidae are. I know that the oothecas from Blattellids tend to house more eggs and are often larger than those of Blattids but are there any physical characteristics in both adults and nymphs that differentiate the two families? Any input will be appreciated.

Thanks, Mark

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It's interesting that the Blattellidae are in the same superfamily as the live bearing species (hissers, Blaberus, Panchlora etc.) while the Blattidae despite similarities are more closely related to cryptocercids and termites. Unfortunately I don't have the answer but I asked Darren from BCG:

"the easiest way to distinguish the Blattellidae from the Blattidae are:

Underside of middle and hind femora always entirely and similarly spined on both sides (exception the Archiblattinae), pulvilli and arolia usually present.

Male:

Subgenital plate symmetrical (at most weakly asymmetrical), bearing two widely separated cylindrical styles at the postereolateral margins

Female

Subgenital plate symmetrical (valvular), bearing a pair of valve, divided by a longitudinal groove."

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Hello, this is Mark. I am interested to know what the main identifying factors between the roach families Blattidae and Blattellidae are. I know that the oothecas from Blattellids tend to house more eggs and are often larger than those of Blattids but are there any physical characteristics in both adults and nymphs that differentiate the two families? Any input will be appreciated.

Thanks, Mark

Thanks Orin.

Mark

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""the easiest way to distinguish the Blattellidae from the Blattidae are:

Underside of middle and hind femora always entirely and similarly spined on both sides (exception the Archiblattinae), pulvilli and arolia usually present.

Male:

Subgenital plate symmetrical (at most weakly asymmetrical), bearing two widely separated cylindrical styles at the postereolateral margins

Female

Subgenital plate symmetrical (valvular), bearing a pair of valve, divided by a longitudinal groove.""

Nice, detailed description. Maybe I missed something but which ones were you describing?

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