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Hisserdude

Pacman frog questions.

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Hi, I am considering getting one of these from a petstore near me, but I have a few questions.

1: How big do males get? The store sells males, and I hear that females can get up to 7 inches long, but I don't really want something that big. Are the males smaller?

2: Are darkling beetle larva good for the staple diet? In specific multiple Eleodes sp and superworms?

3: Can I keep one in a large plastic tupperware container with holes drilled in it, instead of a tank? It would be a 128 fl oz container, which is pretty large.

Thanks in advance!

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Males are smaller than females- 3 to 4 inches. Many people advise against feeding darkling beetle larvae because they can cause constipation (or even that they will chew through the stomach lining! Not true!) but the dangers are probably exaggerated. But darkling beetle larvae are not very nutritious and definetely should not be a staple. Get some feeder roaches! And there's no reason not to use a Tupperware container, assuming its big enough and you've washed out any manufacturing chemicals.

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Thanks for all the info! Would lobster roaches be good for a staple? And would the lobsters be able to live indefinitely in a 128 fl oz container, or would they need a much bigger container than that? One more question, how many times a week should I feed the pacman frog?

Thanks in advance!

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I think lobster roaches would be just as good as any other roach, but they can climb. I don't think a container that small would permanently house enough roaches to sustain your frog, but I don't know that for sure. A juvenile frog should be fed daily, an adult can probably eat every 2-4 days unless it's getting fat. I think pacman frogs are lazy and don't burn many calories, so they probably don't need a lot of food. I don't have experiance with pacmans specifically, but I've kept tree frogs for several years now. One tip I have for all terrestrial frogs is not to let them sit in dirty water. Provide several inches of substrate, preferably with a good population of fungi, springtails, and microorganisms, with a drainage layer at the bottom. Make sure it's never soaked or waterlogged. If you have a water bowl, keep it clean- waterlogged substrate and dirty water bowls will spawn bacteria that can give your frog red leg or some other nasty bacterial infection.

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Alright, thanks for the answers! I probably will stick with invertebrates for the time being, but I do hope to get a pacman when I have more room! :)

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Pacman frogs are the easiest frog to keep. Depending on the frog, they can be super lazy or super active. My pacman frog was always super active. 128 fl oz. is only 1 gallon(?) which isn't big enough at all. It may be big enough for a juvie but a full grown adult it will not. You can feed them a variety of insects and even mice. I always fed dubia, hissers, lobsters, crickets, and one pinkie a month. When I first got mine, I fed everyday even though he was a full grown male. I fed him at minimum 2 dubia roach nymphs. One in the morning and one at night. After a couple of weeks, I fed him one day heavily. Usually 10 dubia roaches as that's what he would eat in 15 minutes. Clean water IS A MUST for ANY animal. NEVER let water just sit. Especially for frogs. It WILL hurt and possibly kill them. Another thing about water, NEVER EVER USE TAP WATER!!!! Too many chemicals that will kill your frog over time. Think about it like this, someone poisons you and you don't know about it. You get more sick and eventually you die. That's what you are doing to your frog. Always expect the worse with them ie: biting, screaming, being threatened. These frogs are totally awesome and super easy to care for.

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Thanks for the advice! When I get a bigger place I will probably get one of these, they seem to be a very interesting pet! :)

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In the future one of the things i would like to have is a pixie frog. Right now we are preparing for Question marks, waiting for our hissers to breed, and looking for a nice sized tank (3 gallon maybe?) for my black moor. I need something with a filter that comes with it. The moor would be the only thing in there, i might could get a second moor i guess so he's not so lonely.

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By "black moor" do you mean the funky eyed goldfish? If so then your looking at 20- 30 gallons for one fish. Here's a tip: if you use a HOB power filter, stick a few cuttings of pothos, philodendron or some other ivy that can live indefinetely with submerged roots into the top of the filter. Normally you do water changes to prevent nitrates from building up after being converted from ammonia and nitrites by the bacteria in your filter. But if you put a plant in the filter, it will suck up the nitrates and regular water changes become less important.

I'm not a big fan of fancy artificially bred fish, but black moors are pretty neat- they're so black! Good luck.

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Pixie frogs are great for roach population control. Though you'll probably have to start using rodents as they get bigger.

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Or larger roaches :) I have personally seen a pixie frog eat 10 full grown male G. portentosa with ease... That to me, is a little scary!

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