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  2. Shon2

    cheap wood/cork?

    Looking for leftovers from fish stores might work! The driftwood sold there is comparable to cork, and typically doesn't mold as easily. It's not cheap, but it lasts longer and may be worth your time. I'd rather spend $10 on something that'll last a year than $5 on something that'll only last a month.
  3. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Porcellio sp. "Spiky - Canary"
  4. Adorable profile picture! :D

    Do you remember who the artist is? 

  5. Last week
  6. Actually these kind of grey springtails also tend to inhabit my terrariums and my eclosures on their own, they came from outside I guess and now they are in the ground in large numbers sometimes, but they are defenitely not harmful and they help eating away even the smallest piece of leftovers...
  7. thelifemotif

    Enclosure for Panchlora nivea/Gyna lurida

    1) I added some half bamboo sticks (large), some barks/woods and some very large leaves I've found, so that they can climb. I would like to avoid egg cartoons since I like the "natural" look it has now 2) For the Panchlora I've built a similar container but with a smaller net window so that it would keep more humidity in it, of course the opening can be closed completely if necessary. Should I do something extra to keep the humidity for them? (Is there a specific substrate to use?) If they like more hides I could use some big pieces of bark, coco shells, and some woods if it's fine. 3) About the "humidity gradient" it should be enough the net windows (the enclosure will be more dry close to it) or should I also use some other strategy like using two substrates? They heat cable it's already not simmetrical to provide temperature gradient. I think if I also give them something to climb gyna will use it to avoid the substrate and stay drier if they wish. My G. Centurio are great climbers! For the heat cable I prefer to use it inside since it's much more efficient energetically, and this cable doesn't really get hot (I've tested it), it's also completely insulated. Plus I am planning to use it with a dimmer to lower the power as needed. Btw it's already 15w the minimun available... 4) Thanks! Anyway I've made another port like that also the in the second container so now both have a secondary access just to be sure! Anyway thanks for answering!
  8. Hisserdude

    Enclosure for Panchlora nivea/Gyna lurida

    I think that enclosure will work great for the Gyna lurida, maybe add one or two bark hides or egg carton flats for the adults. Panchlora spp. enjoy a lot more hides as adults, and prefer a more humid enclosure, (it looks like you're going with a humidity gradient in the pictured enclosure, which Gyna like). Also, I would put the heat cable UNDER the enclosure, not IN it, as that could be harmful for the roaches... I have always put my heat cable underneath my bins, with great success. Love the idea of the little feeding port by the way, I do think that'd definitely be more useful for the Panchlora than the G.lurida.
  9. Hisserdude

    LIttle kenyan roaches as feeders

    Wow, that's insane... 😐 Well that sucks for people who have to follow the stringent USDA rules to the letter.
  10. The Mantis Menagerie

    LIttle kenyan roaches as feeders

    Most US native insects are regulated. Only strict carnivores or detritivores are not regulated. I have even been told that I cannot get the permits for Stenopelmatus without a containment facility.
  11. Hisserdude

    Where to find these species-

    You'll want to look for Ectobius spp. in shrubbery and such in urbanized areas, they might come to lights too. Sweep netting would probably be a good way to catch some I'd think...
  12. Hisserdude

    LIttle kenyan roaches as feeders

    Even the native US ones? That seems pretty odd IMO, I've always understood that native US insects (besides some beetles) are not illegal to own, I mean shipping across state lines is a little questionable and each state has their own laws on that, but I mean these are US natives we're talking about here...
  13. Hisserdude

    Nauphoeta cinerea as feeders

    Very odd that they'd use that synonym, but at least we know that red runners are legal! Which is weird though, because I thought I heard there were actually restrictions coming for that species, due to them outcompeting other pest roaches where they've been introduced...
  14. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Roachy Horde

    Thank you! When my shipment of that species entered transit, it stayed there for around 2 weeks for some reason before finally being delivered to my house. It was one of the few really bad experiences I've had with USPS, but even though they were Ectobiids (which are typically much more fragile than other roaches), they all arrived alive.
  15. Shon2

    AAA's Roachy Horde

    Absolutely beautiful collection you've got! How was your one poor roach shipped by usps? :'D I would hope they respect the "live animal" labels plastered across crates and such, but I know how some facilities can be >:[
  16. Anacimas

    SIck roach please help!

    A panoply of potentially toxic chemicals can remain in clothing, bed sheets, mattresses, etc. even after repeated washing. And because the little guy is an exotic, even a seemingly miniscule titer eaten or inhaled might prove harmful. Please see: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151023084508.htm
  17. All About Arthropods

    Where to find these species-

    Supella will be a pest inside of houses, Cryptocercus will be inside of rather large, rotten logs, and I believe I.derepeltiformis should inhabit the same niches as Parcoblatta. I'm not exactly sure on the Ectobius though.
  18. Guest

    SIck roach please help!

    I have a huge male gromphadorhina portentosa that I have become very close to. It hangs out with me for days at a time even sleeping under my covers at night and not running away. I was thinking he may have been moving a little slower than normal but I wasn't sure. A few hours later I went to sleep with him between my leg and the covers (hanging upside down from covers) I find this way he can walk around and position himself (usually close to my leg for warmth) to where he is at a comfortable temp. I noticed this time he stayed in the exact spot where I placed him without finding a spot he liked. I slept a few hours to find my leg around him covered in clear fluid smelling of bananas (his last meal). I cleaned us both up and found he was lethargic and barely moving. I put him back in his temp controlled enclosure literally putting his head in a shallow water dish to make sure he could hydrate. I know he was not physically injured while he was with me. He only molted to adult about 3 months ago so this is not old age. He was back in his house for about 12hrs and I checked on him he seem more lethargic now only "waving" a leg if I gently squeeze his abdomen. I changed his water out with grape juice (a favorite of his). I really don't want to loose him since he was a very kind, gentle, well behaved male that I grew a close bond to. If anyone can tell me either anything to do to help him or what may have caused him to become ill I would greatly appreciate it. I have had roaches die after displaying similar behavior before after spending time with me. The first time this happened I thought they were getting to cold and dying as I keep my house a few degrees below 70. Since then I make sure they are on me or close to me for warmth. I have had them run off before and they were found healthy 3-4 days latter and they had not found a warm place to hide. So I think I have ruled out the cold killing them especially since I never keep them out of there house for more than a day or 2. I then started thinking maybe they are getting to hot sometimes getting up to human body temp. However I think I can rule this out as well since I no longer keep them against me and they usually find a spot under the covers partially touching me for warmth and they are free to rome the bed and find a spot where they are happy. Furthermore I have read there natural environment can get to a 100. So I am now clueless as to what could be hurting them by hanging out with me. Does anyone have any ideas? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Steve
  19. The Mantis Menagerie

    Nauphoeta cinerea as feeders

    I just confirmed that Paratropes lateralis is synonymous with Blatta lateralis on the list.
  20. Hi! I've recently bought online these species and I am setting the enclosure for them, they are not arrived yet... I've set up this enclosure which could be used either for P. Nivea or G. Lurida dependings on which would fit better in it according to your opinion, but I am planning to build something similar for the other specie. It's basically a wide plastic box with some openings I've made and closed with mosquito net and hot glue, it has a large lid but also a smaller entrance I've made recycling a DVD box (it worked pretty well actually) so that If I need to open the container at night or for feeding I won't let the whole colony fly away! Inside there's a heat cable for the winter (T normally is 17-18 C in the house), and the subtrate is made of coco fiber, peat moss, sphagnum moss and powdered leaves (I've crushed some dried oak leaves and others). On the top there is a layer of dried leaves sterilized in the owen. Do you think it could be a fine arrangement for one of these species?
  21. The Mantis Menagerie

    LIttle kenyan roaches as feeders

    P. nivea does not require permits, and they are the only roach I have ever had that comes close to my lobster roaches in breeding rate! I think the roach Hisserdude mentioned is regulated. As I understand it, all roaches require permits by default.
  22. In addition to the species that were deregulated, I found a whole myriad of roach species native to my state that I'd like to keep. They are- Ischnoptera deropeltiformis Supella longipalpa Ectobius pallidus Cryptocercuc punctulatus Parcoblatta uthleriana Parcoblatta divisa Does anyone know how to find any of these species? I know how to find the parcoblatta sp, but does anyone know how to find the rest?
  23. mantisfan101

    LIttle kenyan roaches as feeders

    Banana roaches seem appealing, and since they can fly it would be more appealing to certain mantid species. I decided to go for red runners since I've always kept live-bearers and I wsnted to try out a species that laid ooths. As for the compsodes schwarzi, where could you get a colony of these? Are these prolific enough to be used as a feeder? And most importantly, would it be legal to transport them?
  24. I have separate colonies for feeders and pets, (but no longer keep feeders as I don't have much to feed them to). And I've been known to OCCASIONALLY use "pet" species as feeders if their numbers are super high and they aren't selling well, to prevent overcrowding. 😅
  25. Dermestids might not hurt ooths, but would certainly tackle molting roaches if hungry... Alphitobius will eat anything, ANYTHING if their numbers are high enough, and can be dangerous to molting roaches, ooths, and maybe even perfectly healthy slower moving roach species too. So you can use either species, but you must be sure to keep their numbers in check, otherwise they have the capability to wreak havoc on roach enclosures, (then again all your roach species are pests of some sort, so it may take a lot to stress them... 😅).
  26. Hisserdude

    LIttle kenyan roaches as feeders

    Maybe get some Compsodes schwarzi? They are technically US natives, and therefore shouldn't be regulated I don't think, (not that most normal hobbyists bother following these regulations, only those applying for other permits, and the USDA doesn't seem to care too much about Blatticulture ATM), plus they are prolific and even smaller than little Kenyans.
  27. Hisserdude

    Bantua sp. "Namibia"

    Just a little bit lol, though there has actually been at least one study showing individual roaches do have varying personalities and tendencies... 😅 Thanks, I may be down to two species right now, but I think they're two pretty awesome ones! And no problem, I'm happy to help!
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