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Cockroaches Eat Bedbugs?


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#1 Severus

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 02:52 AM

Cockroaches and Their Hardy Constitution against Pest Control
Published by Jennifer under Pest Control

Cockroaches are disgusting, frightening pests, but they may be able to help get rid of other disgusting, frightening pests. The fear of the domestic cockroach is warranted, because they are associated with the development of childhood asthma, and may contaminate food in homes, bringing germs and diseases to humans. However, these insects are omnivore scavengers, who clean up our environment and help recycle the organic litter that accumulates when it is not decomposed by certain organisms like cockroaches. They eat the glue off the backs of postage stamps, the bindings off the backs of books, paper, cloth, leather, and electrical wire insulation, but especially bedbugs. Cockroaches infest millions of homes around the world, and there are more than 4,000 different species of cockroaches worldwide. The relentless insects have lived for more than 250 million years, and are able to survive almost every situation. The cockroach is a nocturnal insect that needs a supply of foods with high water content, once inside the home they will seek out food scraps, unsealed food containers, sugar and greases deposits, pet food, and rancid meat.

Bedbugs may inhabit apartments, hotels, dormitories, and shelters. These insects feast solely on the blood of warm-blooded animals, especially humans, as they take shelter in pillows, clothing, furniture, and luggage. The cockroach is the known enemy of the irritating bedbug, which infests millions of homes. The bite of the bedbug can cause irritation and an allergic reaction, but cockroaches can help prevent these bites, by consuming the small nocturnal insects. Bedbugs are the cockroach’s midnight snack, and cockroaches will eat and kill a bedbug infestation. Cockroaches hide in dark warm corners of the human’s home, such as wall cavities, sub-floors, roof voids, cracks and crevices in the kitchen and bathroom, and in electrical appliances and foodstuffs.

Like bedbugs, cockroaches emerge at night, but the cockroaches will eat the bedbugs before they are able to feast on human blood. The acute sensory and survival instincts of the cockroach lead it to the parasitic bedbug. Cockroaches are commonly found in kitchens and garbage, but once in the home they will seek out the smaller bedbug, and consume them. Cockroaches provide a great service in ridding environments of organic litter and killing a bedbug colony, but cockroaches can cause much contamination themselves. They may be potential carriers of germs that cause disease in human, such as dysentery and gastro-enteritis. They are also known carriers of salmonella and other diseases that may cause stomach problems. These disease are obtained by human beings, because cockroaches spread pathogenic organisms with their feces and defensive secretions.

Cockroaches also cause asthmatic reactions. Cockroaches molt regularly throughout their life-cycle, and the discarded skin becomes airborne and can cause severe asthmatic reactions, especially in children and the elderly. Cockroaches may eat organic material and bedbugs, but they are able to survive for a month without food. They are defined as the hardiest insects on the planet, and are capable to hold their breaths for 45 minutes. The cockroach is even able to survive radiation caused by a nuclear reaction; they can remain alive in a vacuum for up to ten minutes, and they may survive for five to seven days with a severed head or longer with proper hydration.  All cockroaches are not bad, and it is common for children to have the Madagascar Hissing cockroach as a pet; some zoos even advocate the adoption of the hissing cockroach as a childhood pet. Cockroaches may be disgusting, but they can help get rid of other disgusting dead organisms and can help control a bedbug infestation.

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Here is the link: http://gardening.savvy-cafe.com/?s=bedbug


Take what you can have. Rejoice in what you can save, and do not mourn your losses too long.

#2 Matt K

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 03:04 AM

blink.gif

Oh good grief...


#3 Allpet Roaches

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 03:34 AM

I would hope everyone realizes the above 'article' is full of false and misleading information,
The recurrence of the asthma lie is frustrating. A single US inner city study found a correlation of more severe asthma attacks in people who had asthma and also had cockroach allergies along with cockroach infestations. No cause relationship was ever implied or imagined in the study. Other similar studies in other countries found no correlation with asthma attack severity.

#4 Severus

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 04:10 AM

I'll post that under the article on the website.

Do they really "seek out and destroy" bed bugs though?
Take what you can have. Rejoice in what you can save, and do not mourn your losses too long.

#5 EffeCi

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 07:55 PM

I'm a professional pest control operator.. and I've seen many times the presence of bedbug and german cockroaches in the same infested houses...
And there was a big infestation of both species... dry.gif
Roach is now...

<a href="http://www.entoforum.it" target="_blank">Entoforum: an italian forum about roaches, sticks and other arthropods</a>
<a href="http://www.pest2000.it" target="_blank">Bedbugs eradication</a>

#6 Matt K

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 09:00 PM

I have never known any roach to have hunting behavior.  The only time a roach goes off scavenging is when dense colonies that are underfed can result in a small degree of cannibalism.

The whole article is so full of disputable statements that I would not even know where to start, hence my previous post.  mellow.gif


#7 Allpet Roaches

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 12:42 AM

QUOTE(Severus @ May 3 2008, 04:10 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'll post that under the article on the website.

Do they really "seek out and destroy" bed bugs though?

Sounds dubious. There are a few true facts in the article but they are presented in a context that makes them false (such as 4,000 species referring to pests when only about 25 of those are). Also, there is absolutely NO PROOF whatsoever that any cockroach ever transferred salmonella to a human. I could pick it apart piece by piece but some people believe what they want to in spite of any real data.

#8 Ralph

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Posted 04 May 2008 - 12:35 PM

What a nasty stereotype mad.gif ! In the Compleat Cockroach, there was an experiment concerning the "cockroach eats bedbug" thing. A starved german cockroach was put in a cage with some bedbugs. It didn't eat any in a week. I'd say the only roach to eat a bedbug would be an orangehead or maybe giganteus. My asthma isn't affected by my roaches either.
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#9 BugmanPrice

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 12:44 AM

Even her own article doesn't make sence...Scavenger ≠ predator!!! I could MAYBE see a roach eating a dead bedbug but come on.

#10 RosenKrieger

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 05:57 AM

QUOTE(Ralph @ May 4 2008, 05:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My asthma isn't affected by my roaches either.


Neither is mine. I was worried when I first read that. But then I found out through experience (living in a room with my roach colonies) and further research that it just wasn't true. lol




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