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Parcoblatta fulvescens


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#1 Cariblatta

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 03:39 PM

Turned out this species was P. fulvescens

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#2 Cariblatta

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 03:40 PM

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#3 RomanBuck

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 03:58 PM

It looks a lot like the blatta lateralis to me.
Strong colonies (200+):
G. portentosa hybrids
B. dubia

Small building colonies (150 or less)
G. portentosa
P. nivea
N. cinerea
B. giganteus
T. olegrandjeani
B. craniifer
B. lateralis
H. flexivatta
P. surinamesis
E. chopardi

#4 Cariblatta

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 04:27 PM

View PostRomanBuck, on 19 November 2013 - 03:58 PM, said:

It looks a lot like the blatta lateralis to me.

There are some similarities but they are very distinctive from each other

#5 windward

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 07:50 PM

I guess you won't need any then?
That's exactly how mine look, nice blackish abdomens on the girls. You might keep an eye on them and see if you notice any mild aggression from adult females. There are papers noting it on this species and I have witnessed mature females chasing other females, males, and late instars of both sexes while appearing to try to nip at the other roach's legs. I've never seen the pursuing female catch another roach to see what happens.

#6 RomanBuck

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 08:27 PM

Why can't I upload pictures.
Strong colonies (200+):
G. portentosa hybrids
B. dubia

Small building colonies (150 or less)
G. portentosa
P. nivea
N. cinerea
B. giganteus
T. olegrandjeani
B. craniifer
B. lateralis
H. flexivatta
P. surinamesis
E. chopardi

#7 Cariblatta

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 10:51 PM

View Postwindward, on 19 November 2013 - 07:50 PM, said:

I guess you won't need any then?
That's exactly how mine look, nice blackish abdomens on the girls. You might keep an eye on them and see if you notice any mild aggression from adult females. There are papers noting it on this species and I have witnessed mature females chasing other females, males, and late instars of both sexes while appearing to try to nip at the other roach's legs. I've never seen the pursuing female catch another roach to see what happens.

I definitely need them for comparisons because the ones you have looked somewhat different from mine. I'm not sure if it has to do with variation but I would like to compare yours with mine to see the difference :)

Mine are surprisingly calm toward each other. I have seen some aggressions during feeding time but other than that, they have been nice to each other.

#8 windward

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 02:02 AM

Interesting. I don't see any aggression out of nymphs or even males.I'm not absolutely 100% certain mine are P. fulvescens, but that's what the males match up with and it is widely distributed.

#9 Cariblatta

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 02:18 PM

View Postwindward, on 20 November 2013 - 02:02 AM, said:

Interesting. I don't see any aggression out of nymphs or even males.I'm not absolutely 100% certain mine are P. fulvescens, but that's what the males match up with and it is widely distributed.

Now that I think about it, I only have a single adult female for now and rest of them are subadult nymphs (with the exception of one adult male that emerged few days ago) so that might be why I don't see any aggressions yet.

#10 Cariblatta

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 06:59 AM

More pics of this species

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#11 Cariblatta

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:54 AM

More adults have emerged :)

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#12 Cariblatta

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 07:43 AM

My adults are finally dropping some oothecae :)
Will take some pics when I get my light source back.

#13 Cariblatta

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 04:07 PM

Mating fulvescens :)

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#14 happy1892

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 02:26 AM

Wow.  Cariblatta: So all the ones that looked like that in your pictures were P. fulvescens?

#15 happy1892

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 02:43 AM

Wait a minute... the adult male in that picture only has two dots.  Mine have four dots.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/783394

#16 Cariblatta

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 03:16 AM

View Posthappy1892, on 17 December 2013 - 02:43 AM, said:

Wait a minute... the adult male in that picture only has two dots.  Mine have four dots.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/783394

P. fulvescens are suppose to have only two dots. I am speculating that yours is P. caudelli but I would leave it as unidentified species for now.

#17 happy1892

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 05:30 PM

Ok, thank you.

#18 happy1892

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 03:19 AM

Oh, I did not know.  You do have Parcoblatta with the four dots that look like P. fulvescens.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/792623
Do the P. fulvescens always have big wings that almost touch each other?  And the unknown species wings farther apart and smaller?

#19 Cariblatta

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 01:16 AM

View Posthappy1892, on 20 December 2013 - 03:19 AM, said:

Oh, I did not know.  You do have Parcoblatta with the four dots that look like P. fulvescens.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/792623
Do the P. fulvescens always have big wings that almost touch each other?  And the unknown species wings farther apart and smaller?

That's the usual case though it won't apply to the ones with deformed wings or some wing related abnormality.

#20 happy1892

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 02:26 AM

Wow, ok.  I might have had females of each type of wings and the smaller winged one's wings would vary in size.  But I am not sure, the pictures of both of yours look similar.




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