Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/12/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Welcome Cole! I'm pretty sure that your experience with all kind of invertebrates can help the roach community as well.
  2. 1 point
    No prob! I would say she's pretty much certainly mixed with G.oblongonota as they're the second most common hisser species in the hobby and she does show similar dark red coloration.
  3. 1 point
    Unfortunately she is a Gromphadorhina hybrid; they can vary much in color from individual to individual. The male features much more of the classic MHC coloration, but he is still almost surely a hybrid as well since he wasn't gotten from one of the couple select sources for pure G.portentosa such as Kyle Kandilian of Roachcrossing.
  4. 1 point
  5. 1 point
    Dang, sorry to hear about your health. Anyway, the part of the anatomy you're talking about is the pronotum.
  6. 1 point
    I did set up a second enclosure with moist cocopeat soil and a lot of stacked pieces of bark (both vertical and horizontal). A very well ventilated lid on top. After that I transferred around 12 animals to the new enclosure. It was a good opportunity to check my population. The inspection showed that I have some adults, and a lot of nymphs of at least 3 different stages. In my setup, the inter-generation time is around 8 months. And it turns out that the first generation gave at least 3 batches of young before they perished themselves from old age, with around 10 young in each batch. So if all goes well and assuming only little loss along the way, I should be able to crank out a decent colony within a year. Keeping my fingers crossed....
  7. 1 point
    Some update, as it has been brought to my attention that Schizopilia fissicollis isn't doing well in captivity for a lot of people. Mine are still going strong, but that are a bit picky when it comes to their habitat it seems. Here is what I do and what I learned: * How I keep them: - pure cocofiber at the bottom, slightly moist. On top of that some stones. On the stones I have a pile of dry pieces of bark. - I feed them fish food and some fruits. - I rarely mist the enclosure - I do not heat the enclosure. - There is plenty of ventilation in the system. - I keep disturbances to an absolute minimum. * What I learned: - They are sensitive to mold. - They do not need a lot of moisture, although they tend to hide in the slightly more moist lower parts of the bark pile. - They like fruit and eat a lot of fish food. I keep the fish food dry and I make sure that the fruit is never molted. I'm planning to set up a larger second enclosure to ramp up their number. Anyone else experience with this species?
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
    Today I saw a female Pseudoglomeris magnifica roach walking on the front glass. And upon close inspection I saw, much to my delight, three small nymphs clinging between their mother's legs. (picture is rather dull, due to the anti-reflection cross-polarization filters I had on my flash). I'm very happy with this!
  10. 1 point
    Stanislas look up the panchlora sp "white" species hisserdude posted some photos about awhile ago?
  11. 1 point
    Always beautiful to see! Wish there was a species that stayed that color, it would be an angel-like roach
  12. 1 point
    Hello there friends, I've started breeding these magnificent species. Paratropes phalerata is a diurnal cockroach that lives on live plants. In some literature has been cited as an important pollinator :-) I've been trying several ways to keep them... At the beginning I've tried to emulate an habitat with the same plants I usually find them on. But it's been a little tricky and not necessarily better in captive breeding. So at this moment I'm keeping most of the groups I have in small boxes, with good ventilation and moist substrate, and barks for them to perch on, just to keep looking for the best way to breed them (Different foods and that stuff)... They like sweet fruits like mango... ;-) I already got some oothecae, they stick them to... anywhere hahaha Sticky side: ;-) But this one on the plantae is really how they lay their oothecae in the wild: As I said before... barks seems to be just fine :-p Incubating eggs apart: Some other pics :-) This is a perfect display cockroach!!! is really funny to watch them walking around the boxes and kind of communicate each other by touching their antennae. They are visible and busy during most of the hours of light, but not like looking for an escape, rather just wandering around the barks and soil. Sometimes I watch them taking a determinate route and taking a bite of food in every lap Next step: A big planted terrarium for all of them, with dishes containing pollen, sweet fresh fruits and some other foods with high flour content ¿Has anyone of you breed these before? Your suggestions would be very grateful :-D
  13. 1 point
    Any updates on this species were you ever able to get their ooths to hatch consistently?
  14. 1 point
    Wow... Thank you @Test Account I'm sorry I didn't read it before ? I get it... I hope he gets better and come back around here...
  15. 1 point
    So far it looks like Corydidarum magnifica is mostly active during the day, and much less at night (diurnality). They often wander over objects, making them quite visible. I wonder if their shiny colors and looks are a kind of mimicry for some kind of foul tasting beetle in their natural habitat?
×