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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/22/2018 in Posts

  1. 3 points
    Today I saw a female Pseudoglomeris magnifica roach walking on the front glass. And upon close inspection I saw, much to my delight, three small nymphs clinging between their mother's legs. (picture is rather dull, due to the anti-reflection cross-polarization filters I had on my flash). I'm very happy with this!
  2. 3 points
    Managed to take some better pictures, couldn't withhold these...
  3. 2 points
    Found this photo and I wanted to share. ๐Ÿ˜‹
  4. 2 points
    Dr. Darby Proctor, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Florida Institute of Technology has recently started using cockroaches to teach principles of psychology and neuroscience. Article and video below: https://adastra.fit.edu/blog/research/florida-tech-discovery-magazine-spring-2019-buggin-out/ I met Darby at a conference last week, were we were both presenting some of our cockroach research. The conference was near her school, so she actually was able to bring some of her discoid cockroaches! It was my first time seeing discoids in person. I now have "other roach envy." I know a number of labs that are investigating using hissing cockroaches for similar work, but generally I find them too lethargic. I have made some good progress with my research as well, and just received a grant to continue the work, though I do not yet have any fun videos to show yet.
  5. 2 points
    I have a particular fondness for roaches that a layperson might look at and ask "what is that?" instead of going "ew, a cockroach". Variety is the spice of life, and the variety of living things is a particularly good spice. I also like the round shapes. I know these aren't common species, but can anyone point me towards some care info on them? I'm trying to figure out something to keep in an Exo Terra 8x8x8 or 8x8x12. These three are looking like they might be possible candidates. I figure I need something fairly small, that doesn't need deep substrate (the most I can get in this is 2" without some juryrigging), that won't scatter everywhere or fly into my face when I open the tank. There's about a 1mm gap along the side edges of the door due to how it's constructed. If I really wanted to, I could silicone the door shut and just open it from the top, but I'd prefer something that can't squeeze out there. I could probably also rig something to make the substrate deeper if it was needed. I also want something that can be reliably left alone as long as it has food and moisture. For the bark roaches, it looks like they eat only apples and bark. I'd give them hardwood bark, we have pecan trees in the area. Would they eat dried apples, do you think? Not store-bought, just sliced thin and dried to jerky texture in the oven. Easier to just keep in a container next to the enclosure to feed them whenever they need it. How warm do they like to be? They look like they'd take decent advantage of climbing space, running up and down things, and might be especially visible from the sides through the glass. The pillbug roaches, I can't find much data on. Roachcrossing says they need good ventilation, moist air, and will eat apples, and I know @Hisserdude had some at one point. Does anyone have any advice on them?
  6. 2 points
    Hello! I want to show you some of my more uncommon [here in Europe] roach species. My foto size reduction is slightly better than in my last topic and I will further try to improve this. Melanozosteria nitida BRUNNER VON WATTENWYL 1865 (from Khai Sok in Thailand) Only under lights more redish than black, but look at the defensive secretion on their last abdominal segments. They are incredible fast runners. Thorax porcellana SAUSSURE 1862 (from India and Sri Lanka) Beautyful species from the Epilamprinae subfamily. Most fascinating are the baby cockroaches below their mothers wings for the first weeks. First rank breakout artists.
  7. 2 points
    Just FYI, I've created a new blog dedicated to caresheets, specifically for invertebrates that I've successfully bred myself. This includes a few of the more obscure invertebrates out there, and of course, plenty of cockroaches! Stay tuned for new caresheets posted periodically! Invertebrate Dude Caresheets
  8. 2 points
    Thank you! Yeah they do look a lot like oblongonota with these spots. I was looking at a picture with the different horns of males but I can't tell the differences between hybrids and species for the life of me. I'm certainly better at isopod identification :d At least they're just goth like me ๐Ÿ’€ I hope their offspring will be as gorgeous as they are.
  9. 2 points
    They are absolutely capable of noticing differences, changing their behavior, learning, and maybe even having basic moods or emotions, but I do think what is going on with them is not quite as complicated as what causes behavior for you or I. We are sort of designed to explain things in terms that we understand, so its very normal to assume another animal (or even another person) thinks the way we do, but it is rarely the case. I imagine he simply has less reason to do things now that there are no mature females around. He will likely perk up if other adult females are around, or when the nymphs get bigger. He might even be more active if there was another male for him to have territorial disputes with, although they may also fight too much. Right now he is likely just chilling, waiting for something that actually requires behavior. I don't think he is depressed, but they are somewhat social species, so I think they probably do the best when they live in groups.
  10. 2 points
    I wanted to try the differential grasshopper, but in my area the two striped is much more common. Its nearly nationwide and seems to prefer areas with tall wild lettuce (Lactuca virosa) and sunflowers. They are supposed to be in PA. Once together they bred readily in captivity, in a butterfly tent, with regular fresh foods including wild lettuce flowers. A study back in the 50's or 60's found the nymphs could be taught to eat a commercial style feed to avoid the hassles of fresh greens. I have some references somewhere if anyones needs them. egg cases in peat
  11. 2 points
    I dug out my Polyphaga saussurei collection, to see how many I have at the moment. 3 Adults and many nymphs. And while they were together, I noticed them moving almost synchronous:
  12. 2 points
    Sorry for the extra late reply lol. They are definitely hissers, but you can't really ID them from nymphs, and if they are unlabeled you might not even be able to tell what they are once mature...
  13. 2 points
    Thank you all for the kind words and encouragement, I really appreciate it! I regret to inform you all though that I have gotten rid of my collection and am leaving the hobby completely now. I tried just cutting my collection size down, but it appears I burnt myself out, I've lost my passion for keeping live invertebrates completely. I still love invertebrates, but I'd rather just look at pictures or observe them in their natural habitat than raise them myself. Maybe I'll get back into the hobby a few years down the line, who knows, but for now I think it's best if I take some time away from the hobby completely. Thank you everyone for all the help, kind words, and of course roaches you've provided me with over the years, this forum and everyone on it will always hold a special place in my heart! Goodbye, and keep on roaching! -Tristan
  14. 1 point
    I looked around and I couldn't find any isopods that looked like either half of him. I assume he was hiding. I'll update if I spot him again. Or if I start seeing matching babies.
  15. 1 point
    Hmm, the type of mold you are describing sounds like a Trichoderma species, most are benevolent scavenger molds that come for their bodies after death, however, some protein hungry species can infect living roaches and kill them... The fact that you have several other roaches in there that aren't dying off at an alarming rate means that your Trichoderma mold is likely a scavenger species, consuming bodies after death, likely thriving in the more humid enclosure. Your hissers are probably fine, but the nymphs may not like the higher humidity, or perhaps competition from the Panchlora, Pycnoscelus or isopods are stressing them out and causing them to die off... TLDR; the mold likely isn't the cause of death or anything to worry about, and is just consuming the roaches which have died due to something else.
  16. 1 point
    I just keep springtails in there and they keep any mold away. Haven't had issues with it. The humidity is probably 100% since there's condensation throughout.
  17. 1 point
    Yeah. I've never been bit by a roach before. It was surprisingly painful. They are really challenging to hold onto. It's worth it once though just to hear them squeak. It's the only time mine make noise. The overcrowding wasn't too bad. I just had a few too many males in a small enclosure as there was some minor wing biting. Also, they don't (yet) group up the same way other roaches do. It's as if each one needs it own space. But my colony is still small, so that might change. From what I've read, this species takes quite awhile to "get going" and develop a full colony. I think the gestation is longer. I would guess 4-5 months. As mentioned, I've had my adults for about a year and have only had 2 generations, yet the females are gravid constantly.
  18. 1 point
    Well good luck man, hopefully those giant Panchlora will start exploding for you soon! Perhaps just try offering less leaf litter, I don't think Panchlora nymphs absolutely need it, but most isopods breed much less without them.
  19. 1 point
    @MarlonDark mealworm coloration, uncanny resemblance to molitor adults (striated elytra, somewhat elongated shape, ridged round pronotum with pointy edges), and ability to survive in dry grains are all traits consistent with Tenebrio obscurus. I do not know any other darkling with this exact trait combination so obscurus seems very probable. @Hisserdude, can you confirm or deny my ID?
  20. 1 point
    Yes, they are indeed. Although males do exist, but they aren't available in the hobby (yet). They are quite slow in reproducing. The cycle from nymph to nymph takes 3 year here. I started with 7, lost 3 adults along the way, and now I have around 70 nymphs (besides the remaining 4 adults). They are a rather boring species. I estimate (from camera movement detection) that they move on average 20 minutes/week. Only in the mating season they become truly active. The females then start wandering around at night, trying to climb on whatever there is available and then wait for, I assume, a male to fly by. My wife thinks it's a bit sad, all those waiting and longing female roaches waiting for their prince ...
  21. 1 point
    Hisser nymphs can be almost impossible to tell apart, and adults of some "Princisia" and Gromphadorhina strains are difficult to tell apart as well, seeing as many commonly sold strains of both are actually hybrids between the two... Additionally, "Princisia" may not be a valid genus in the first place, so even under a microscope you probably couldn't tell their nymphs apart from Gromphadorhina.
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    I don't understand that either:) but hey take it as a compliment that she wants to be closer to you. As to the sage and roaches I'm not sure at all. I use an electric air freshener in my room where I keep my roaches and they don't seem to have seen any I'll effects.
  24. 1 point
    It might not be hot news, but I thought I'd share a new cockroach that I started breeding. Even when it comes to mainstream species, I always prefer to work with wildtypes (meaning strains that originated from known, wild populations) because I feel there is often too much mixing and hybridizing in the arthropod hobby, leading to weaker captive populations. Nymphs of this roach were collected in a small Honduran cave as an unidentified "Blaberus sp.". It appears to be a variety of Blaberus giganteus, with wide black banding and a darker color tone. Adults begin as white individuals but very quickly turn orange. The funny thing is that I never planned to keep B. giganteus. I avoided them due to their bad reputation - low tolerance for crowding and cannibalism. But this strain seems to be ok with it, I still have all the original adults sharing the space with hundreds of nymphs, and while their wings are no longer intact (well, they use them for courtship after all), they are still kicking. They seem to be very hardy.
  25. 1 point
    So far it looks like Corydidarum magnifica is mostly active during the day, and much less at night (diurnality). They often wander over objects, making them quite visible. I wonder if their shiny colors and looks are a kind of mimicry for some kind of foul tasting beetle in their natural habitat?
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