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  1. 3 points
    EDIT, Nov 2019: In light of new information, this species is NOT Hormetica apolinari, but Hormetica strumosa. A little less-showy than their relatives, Lucihormetica, these are a new addition to the hobby. What they lack in glowspots they make up for in size, robustness, the presence of prominent horns in males, and behavior. They are also quite prolific. Hands down one of the most rewarding species to keep.
  2. 3 points
    Managed to take some better pictures, couldn't withhold these...
  3. 2 points
    Finally got some of these beauties, one of the first to keep them in the US, fingers crossed they'll breed for me! Here are some pictures of a couple nymphs!
  4. 2 points
    A lot of people have been asking me about the species of Panchlora in culture, and why I price the white roaches differently than the others. More specifically, people wanted to know about their size difference. I took a photo to show you the sizes of Panchlora "white" and P. "speckled", compared to P. nivea. Please note that my P. nivea come from a wild population, so they might not be P. nivea at all, but their size is identical to P. nivea that is in culture. These are all unmated females. P. "speckled" is slightly bigger than P. nivea, and Panchlora "white" is even bigger. You can also see the color difference between the species, but I'll note that the light conditions for photographing them were not ideal. Panchlora are known to be very reflective. Besides the body color, you can also see differences in the color of their antennae.
  5. 2 points
    One of my males matured!
  6. 2 points
    I found more! We brought back a total of 5 skulls, 3 with lower jaws, but 4 of them had damaged enough sinuses that the roaches didn't seem to like em any. There were, in fact, 5 more! The skulls are now outside where the sun will scare out any remainder. I don't think there are any, though- I held the skulls perpendicular to the sinus cavities and smacked them until roaches fell out. I got 4 at about 7mm, one at about 15mm. The first one I found has vanished into my peppered roach enclosure, but now that I have more, I've isolated these 5 in their own enclosure. For now they have an inch of coco fiber, a few hardwood leaves, and a bit of pretzel to chew on- I'm tired, so they get something makeshift. Later I'll put them in something with a topsoil/aquarium sand substrate, I think. They came from a skull that was found under some sort of mesquite-type bush. A couple hundred yards from the water, I think. There were a lot of dead bits from the trees on the ground, and the ground itself was very sandy. It was definitely out of where the waves would even remotely get to, and sheltered from storms. It definitely gets pretty hot out there. Hopefully these are okay in less hot temps, I'm not gonna put them in something big enough to safely heat. It was on the island Ni'ihau, which is a small island inhabited by about 200 people, off the coast of the rest. It's largely untouched by human activity, and I'm not sure how much it's been explored. I know someone introduced wild boars at some point, and eland antelope, and who knows what else, so these could be from Africa along with those? Could also be Hawaiian. It's almost in sight of the main islands in Hawai'i, so I think a flying roach could get blown out there in a storm, or it could have come out somehow on a boat. I know I can't get a proper ID until they mature, but does anyone have any guesses at what they are? I don't know how to keep these!
  7. 2 points
  8. 2 points
    Unbeknownst to me, just prior to selling off my large G. oblongonota colony a lone male escaped. Four months later, who comes walking out from behind my desk? 🤔 I was honestly dumbfounded. That's a long time to rogue! It's been about 2 years and I still have that little guy. He has his very own hisser palace and a prominent place in my heart. Similarly, I had an A. insignis go missing... again, unbeknownst to me. I kept hearing strange scratching that sounded like it was coming from inside the walls. I live in an old home that's partly underground; we get mice on occasion so I thought nothing of it, but 2 weeks later I'm still hearing the same sound. Tracked it down to an adult female living in my subwoofer. It seems like the vibrations would make that an unappealing place to hide out, but she seemed quite comfortable. Had to take apart the whole speaker to get her out, though. Final story: While checking my banana roaches one day, I see a small tan similar but not similar roach. Caught it. Not one of mine! Turns out it was a wild Parcoblatta enjoying the highlife of steady food and moisture. They are resourceful little buggers.
  9. 2 points
    For dryer species like hissers, dubia and B. giganteus I use a combo of Alphitobius diaperinus beetles and Paraplecta parva (Little Kenyans). For more humid species I use temperate springtails almost exclusively. For my dirty boys (Rhabdoblatta formosana I'm looking at you) I use a combo of springtails, dwarf white isopods and powder orange isopods. Slightly off topic, but I just added dwarf purples to my Helix aspersa/Haplotrema vancouverense enclosure so I'll see how that turns out.
  10. 2 points
    They are great. I'm happy with the morph, and I started the colony I intend to use for sale 2 weeks ago
  11. 2 points
    Found this photo and I wanted to share. 😋
  12. 2 points
    Dr. Darby Proctor, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Florida Institute of Technology has recently started using cockroaches to teach principles of psychology and neuroscience. Article and video below: https://adastra.fit.edu/blog/research/florida-tech-discovery-magazine-spring-2019-buggin-out/ I met Darby at a conference last week, were we were both presenting some of our cockroach research. The conference was near her school, so she actually was able to bring some of her discoid cockroaches! It was my first time seeing discoids in person. I now have "other roach envy." I know a number of labs that are investigating using hissing cockroaches for similar work, but generally I find them too lethargic. I have made some good progress with my research as well, and just received a grant to continue the work, though I do not yet have any fun videos to show yet.
  13. 2 points
    I have a particular fondness for roaches that a layperson might look at and ask "what is that?" instead of going "ew, a cockroach". Variety is the spice of life, and the variety of living things is a particularly good spice. I also like the round shapes. I know these aren't common species, but can anyone point me towards some care info on them? I'm trying to figure out something to keep in an Exo Terra 8x8x8 or 8x8x12. These three are looking like they might be possible candidates. I figure I need something fairly small, that doesn't need deep substrate (the most I can get in this is 2" without some juryrigging), that won't scatter everywhere or fly into my face when I open the tank. There's about a 1mm gap along the side edges of the door due to how it's constructed. If I really wanted to, I could silicone the door shut and just open it from the top, but I'd prefer something that can't squeeze out there. I could probably also rig something to make the substrate deeper if it was needed. I also want something that can be reliably left alone as long as it has food and moisture. For the bark roaches, it looks like they eat only apples and bark. I'd give them hardwood bark, we have pecan trees in the area. Would they eat dried apples, do you think? Not store-bought, just sliced thin and dried to jerky texture in the oven. Easier to just keep in a container next to the enclosure to feed them whenever they need it. How warm do they like to be? They look like they'd take decent advantage of climbing space, running up and down things, and might be especially visible from the sides through the glass. The pillbug roaches, I can't find much data on. Roachcrossing says they need good ventilation, moist air, and will eat apples, and I know @Hisserdude had some at one point. Does anyone have any advice on them?
  14. 2 points
    Hello! I want to show you some of my more uncommon [here in Europe] roach species. My foto size reduction is slightly better than in my last topic and I will further try to improve this. Melanozosteria nitida BRUNNER VON WATTENWYL 1865 (from Khai Sok in Thailand) Only under lights more redish than black, but look at the defensive secretion on their last abdominal segments. They are incredible fast runners. Thorax porcellana SAUSSURE 1862 (from India and Sri Lanka) Beautyful species from the Epilamprinae subfamily. Most fascinating are the baby cockroaches below their mothers wings for the first weeks. First rank breakout artists.
  15. 2 points
    Just FYI, I've created a new blog dedicated to caresheets, specifically for invertebrates that I've successfully bred myself. This includes a few of the more obscure invertebrates out there, and of course, plenty of cockroaches! Stay tuned for new caresheets posted periodically! Invertebrate Dude Caresheets
  16. 2 points
    Thank you! Yeah they do look a lot like oblongonota with these spots. I was looking at a picture with the different horns of males but I can't tell the differences between hybrids and species for the life of me. I'm certainly better at isopod identification :d At least they're just goth like me 💀 I hope their offspring will be as gorgeous as they are.
  17. 2 points
    They are absolutely capable of noticing differences, changing their behavior, learning, and maybe even having basic moods or emotions, but I do think what is going on with them is not quite as complicated as what causes behavior for you or I. We are sort of designed to explain things in terms that we understand, so its very normal to assume another animal (or even another person) thinks the way we do, but it is rarely the case. I imagine he simply has less reason to do things now that there are no mature females around. He will likely perk up if other adult females are around, or when the nymphs get bigger. He might even be more active if there was another male for him to have territorial disputes with, although they may also fight too much. Right now he is likely just chilling, waiting for something that actually requires behavior. I don't think he is depressed, but they are somewhat social species, so I think they probably do the best when they live in groups.
  18. 1 point
    How's it going everyone? 🙂 Long time no post! School has finally swept past me once again for this year and so my focus can now shift back to the roaches (as if it wasn't already somewhat lol). I plan to get the photoshoots going soon so I can get some more pictures slapped up here and build up this thread. However, one development in my collection that there's no need waiting to supply pictures for is that I'm now officially hisserless! 😮 The allergies were just getting too bad for me and I wasn't doing particularly great with the species I had, so I just decided to sell them all off to a trusted breeder ( @Bmaines96). Even though this is technically supposed to be a thread representing my current collection, I say why not share some pictures here of some absolutely gorgeous roaches I may never own again. 🙂 Here it goes: Elliptorhina laevigata Adult male(s) Freshly-molted adult male Adult females Large nymph(s) Gromphadorhina grandidieri Adult male Adult female Larger nymph Small nymphs Individuals attempting to hide Gromphadorhina grandidieri/Elliptorhina laevigata Adult male comparison (G.grandidieri left, E.laevigata right) Adult male comparison (E.laevigata left, G.grandidieri right) Besides these two hisser species, I also had Gromphadorhina oblongonota, but unfortunately didn't manage to get pictures of them before shipping them away. Anyways, I hope you guys enjoyed what I did have to show and be sure to stay tuned for more pictures from my drastically-enlarged collection!
  19. 1 point
    I have a thriving colony that produces more than I can keep up with. Currently keeping them at 27 C with weekly mistings. I also keep one corner of their 10 gallon tank moist at all times. Try banana and oranges. They love fruit. I also feed mine organic, pesticide/herbicide free maple leaves. They go through a small branch worth every few days.
  20. 1 point
    Yeah, definitely doesn't hurt to add leaves, as they may need at least a small amount in their diets, but all of my Corydiids' favorite foods have been dog food/chick feed.
  21. 1 point
    And don't ever use P. ornatus! People feed them live (but crippled) roaches sometimes, they're extremely protein-hungry and would no doubt devour any roach that molted where they could reach. I'd be wary of using them as cleaners with reptiles, let alone things near their size. Armadillidium species should work out okay. They're a bit slower to breed, they don't have much interest in protein that can avoid them, and they don't tend to burrow. I have A. vulgare in with my domino roaches (accidental introduction), and that doesn't seem to cause any problems, though I do occasionally trap extras out. Since isopods can't climb, they're really easy to thin out. Just bury a deli cup up to its rim in the substrate, put food and a damp substance in the bottom, and cover it loosely with something like a magnolia leaf. Isopods go in after the food and can't climb back out. Then all you have to do is check if the cup contains anything you want to keep, remove anything you want to keep, and dump the rest into somewhere else.
  22. 1 point
    Since I think anyone who really wanted to know could find this information, I live in NC. I am pursuing the permits for exotic phasmids, orthopterans, stag and rhino beetles, mantids, lepidopterans, and millipedes. As a result of the USDA oversight, I have to follow the regulations precisely.
  23. 1 point
    Springtails seem to be the best CUC for most roach species, however some of the larger varieties like the tropical pinks, (Sinella curviseta) have been known to stress out and overwhelm a lot of the more sensitive roach species.
  24. 1 point
    I don't know of any purebred hisser stocks that are black like that, besides possibly the G.grandidieri "Black" stock being bred in the US. Looks like yours are a mix of portentosa and oblogonata based on the overall dark coloration and white spots.
  25. 1 point
    I tried to do a separation like this; I found it really difficult to separate eggs from frass, but I had let it go for a year. Also, the frass had a lot of small roaches buried in it. so I put a dark pot in it and they climbed in. For separating the males, I took the bin outside where it was about 3C / 37F (cold but not freezing). The activity was so low, the males were easy to remove by hand.
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