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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/06/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Got the opportunity to draw some of my roaches for a school assignment These are just sketches, but I would love to do some nicely rendered art of them soon. I would love to see more art of bugs while I'm here! If any of y'all wanna share your art here, please do
  2. 3 points
    EDIT, Nov 2019: In light of new information, this species is NOT Hormetica apolinari, but Hormetica strumosa. A little less-showy than their relatives, Lucihormetica, these are a new addition to the hobby. What they lack in glowspots they make up for in size, robustness, the presence of prominent horns in males, and behavior. They are also quite prolific. Hands down one of the most rewarding species to keep.
  3. 3 points
    I get on occasionally dang itπŸ˜‚ but yep like @All About Arthropods mentioned i have one of the last rhabdoblatta colonies in the states and shockingly i actually don't charge that much as i just want them in people's collections so next time I almost lose mine its not a full on panic mode.. But atm the epilamprids I'm working with are Opistaplatia orientalis-red and black roach-beautiful adults and relatively active at all life stages but mostly stick around in leaf litter Decoralampra fulgencioi-nymphs are excellent bark mimics and adults are shiny beetle mimics with rove like characteristics semi arboreal at all life stages Rhabdoblatta formosana-one of the most arboreal ones but also the fastest breeding and most sensitive to waste build up. Epilamprinae sp "borneo"-basically chunky rhabdoblatta that are just as arboreal as actual rhabdo but more impressive looking and slower breeders Epilampra maya-breed at a relatively slow rate if kept more towards room temp stunning looking shiny nymphs and panchlora-esque adults moderately sensitive to waste buildup but not as bad as rhabdoblatta And finally my favourite(and slowest breeding/rarest/most expensive) epilamprid-thorax porcellana or what ive nicknamed Vampire roaches-these guys look cool at every life stage with adults having neat pyramid shaped wings and nymphs blending in seamlessly with most organic display items also the most arboreal(in my experience tbey only breed well if kept like arboreal tropical mantids) but tbe coolest part? The newborn nymphs hide under the moms pyramid wings until their first molt feeding on the moms blood with a specialized pair of jaws they molt off after leaving moms back!
  4. 2 points
    Finally got some of these beauties, one of the first to keep them in the US, fingers crossed they'll breed for me! Here are some pictures of a couple nymphs!
  5. 2 points
    A lot of people have been asking me about the species of Panchlora in culture, and why I price the white roaches differently than the others. More specifically, people wanted to know about their size difference. I took a photo to show you the sizes of Panchlora "white" and P. "speckled", compared to P. nivea. Please note that my P. nivea come from a wild population, so they might not be P. nivea at all, but their size is identical to P. nivea that is in culture. These are all unmated females. P. "speckled" is slightly bigger than P. nivea, and Panchlora "white" is even bigger. You can also see the color difference between the species, but I'll note that the light conditions for photographing them were not ideal. Panchlora are known to be very reflective. Besides the body color, you can also see differences in the color of their antennae.
  6. 2 points
    It seems that most of the people who say to stay away from animal sources for protein are people who use roaches as feeders. If you read threads in here from people who keep roaches as pets then you will notice that most of them use dog food. Personally, I use a blend of seeds, nuts, and dried fruits. I always have these things on hand because of my diet, so I grind them up in a coffee grinder and feed it to the roaches. I don't know if anybody has done an actual study on how much protein is too much protein. If I remember correctly someone once posted an interview with a scientist that breeds roaches and he said that about 4% protein is all they need. But, hobbyists have been using dog food for years and it doesn't seem to have a negative effect on the roaches. Or at least nobody has noticed a negative effect to report to other hobbyists.
  7. 2 points
    Fingers crossed you get babies!
  8. 2 points
    Thank you! When my shipment of that species entered transit, it stayed there for around 2 weeks for some reason before finally being delivered to my house. It was one of the few really bad experiences I've had with USPS, but even though they were Ectobiids (which are typically much more fragile than other roaches), they all arrived alive.
  9. 2 points
    I found two logs full (out of about six logs I chose to look under) near Asheville, NC. I collected two adults and a number of nymphs. One of the adults was alone. The other adult was with some nymphs, but I think the nymphs were old enough to not need parental care. One of the adults One of the nymphs
  10. 2 points
    Welcome! D. punctata are similar to hissers in care but it's hard to get much production. You'd probably never see 800 at once no matter how much work you put into it. It is a unique species. The D. punctata I have originally came from Roth, but maybe somebody else has something very similar.
  11. 2 points
    Welcome! The "punctata" have actually been confirmed to indeed not be that species last year by taxonomist Dominic Evangelista, but rather Diploptera cf. minor. With that out of the way, they like good ventilation with a mostly dry enclosure and hot temps. πŸ™‚
  12. 2 points
    Please report vulgarity and trolling. Circumventing filters by posting links to overly vulgar language or pornographic sites will result in a permanent and immediate ban. Please don't let it go unnoticed and unreported.
  13. 2 points
  14. 2 points
    @Auz Nah this is a Blattid nymph, pretty sure it's just a dark Periplaneta fuliginosa nymph, they are pretty common in Georgia.
  15. 2 points
    One of my males matured!
  16. 2 points
    I found more! We brought back a total of 5 skulls, 3 with lower jaws, but 4 of them had damaged enough sinuses that the roaches didn't seem to like em any. There were, in fact, 5 more! The skulls are now outside where the sun will scare out any remainder. I don't think there are any, though- I held the skulls perpendicular to the sinus cavities and smacked them until roaches fell out. I got 4 at about 7mm, one at about 15mm. The first one I found has vanished into my peppered roach enclosure, but now that I have more, I've isolated these 5 in their own enclosure. For now they have an inch of coco fiber, a few hardwood leaves, and a bit of pretzel to chew on- I'm tired, so they get something makeshift. Later I'll put them in something with a topsoil/aquarium sand substrate, I think. They came from a skull that was found under some sort of mesquite-type bush. A couple hundred yards from the water, I think. There were a lot of dead bits from the trees on the ground, and the ground itself was very sandy. It was definitely out of where the waves would even remotely get to, and sheltered from storms. It definitely gets pretty hot out there. Hopefully these are okay in less hot temps, I'm not gonna put them in something big enough to safely heat. It was on the island Ni'ihau, which is a small island inhabited by about 200 people, off the coast of the rest. It's largely untouched by human activity, and I'm not sure how much it's been explored. I know someone introduced wild boars at some point, and eland antelope, and who knows what else, so these could be from Africa along with those? Could also be Hawaiian. It's almost in sight of the main islands in Hawai'i, so I think a flying roach could get blown out there in a storm, or it could have come out somehow on a boat. I know I can't get a proper ID until they mature, but does anyone have any guesses at what they are? I don't know how to keep these!
  17. 2 points
  18. 2 points
    Unbeknownst to me, just prior to selling off my large G. oblongonota colony a lone male escaped. Four months later, who comes walking out from behind my desk? πŸ€” I was honestly dumbfounded. That's a long time to rogue! It's been about 2 years and I still have that little guy. He has his very own hisser palace and a prominent place in my heart. Similarly, I had an A. insignis go missing... again, unbeknownst to me. I kept hearing strange scratching that sounded like it was coming from inside the walls. I live in an old home that's partly underground; we get mice on occasion so I thought nothing of it, but 2 weeks later I'm still hearing the same sound. Tracked it down to an adult female living in my subwoofer. It seems like the vibrations would make that an unappealing place to hide out, but she seemed quite comfortable. Had to take apart the whole speaker to get her out, though. Final story: While checking my banana roaches one day, I see a small tan similar but not similar roach. Caught it. Not one of mine! Turns out it was a wild Parcoblatta enjoying the highlife of steady food and moisture. They are resourceful little buggers.
  19. 2 points
    For dryer species like hissers, dubia and B. giganteus I use a combo of Alphitobius diaperinus beetles and Paraplecta parva (Little Kenyans). For more humid species I use temperate springtails almost exclusively. For my dirty boys (Rhabdoblatta formosana I'm looking at you) I use a combo of springtails, dwarf white isopods and powder orange isopods. Slightly off topic, but I just added dwarf purples to my Helix aspersa/Haplotrema vancouverense enclosure so I'll see how that turns out.
  20. 2 points
    They are great. I'm happy with the morph, and I started the colony I intend to use for sale 2 weeks ago
  21. 2 points
    Found this photo and I wanted to share. πŸ˜‹
  22. 2 points
    Dr. Darby Proctor, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Florida Institute of Technology has recently started using cockroaches to teach principles of psychology and neuroscience. Article and video below: https://adastra.fit.edu/blog/research/florida-tech-discovery-magazine-spring-2019-buggin-out/ I met Darby at a conference last week, were we were both presenting some of our cockroach research. The conference was near her school, so she actually was able to bring some of her discoid cockroaches! It was my first time seeing discoids in person. I now have "other roach envy." I know a number of labs that are investigating using hissing cockroaches for similar work, but generally I find them too lethargic. I have made some good progress with my research as well, and just received a grant to continue the work, though I do not yet have any fun videos to show yet.
  23. 2 points
    I have a particular fondness for roaches that a layperson might look at and ask "what is that?" instead of going "ew, a cockroach". Variety is the spice of life, and the variety of living things is a particularly good spice. I also like the round shapes. I know these aren't common species, but can anyone point me towards some care info on them? I'm trying to figure out something to keep in an Exo Terra 8x8x8 or 8x8x12. These three are looking like they might be possible candidates. I figure I need something fairly small, that doesn't need deep substrate (the most I can get in this is 2" without some juryrigging), that won't scatter everywhere or fly into my face when I open the tank. There's about a 1mm gap along the side edges of the door due to how it's constructed. If I really wanted to, I could silicone the door shut and just open it from the top, but I'd prefer something that can't squeeze out there. I could probably also rig something to make the substrate deeper if it was needed. I also want something that can be reliably left alone as long as it has food and moisture. For the bark roaches, it looks like they eat only apples and bark. I'd give them hardwood bark, we have pecan trees in the area. Would they eat dried apples, do you think? Not store-bought, just sliced thin and dried to jerky texture in the oven. Easier to just keep in a container next to the enclosure to feed them whenever they need it. How warm do they like to be? They look like they'd take decent advantage of climbing space, running up and down things, and might be especially visible from the sides through the glass. The pillbug roaches, I can't find much data on. Roachcrossing says they need good ventilation, moist air, and will eat apples, and I know @Hisserdude had some at one point. Does anyone have any advice on them?
  24. 2 points
    Managed to take some better pictures, couldn't withhold these...
  25. 1 point
    One of the nymphs matured, it's a female! A true beauty! Turns out the nymphs produce a waxy substance all over their exoskeletons, similar to Porcellionides isopods and several desert Tenebrionids, which aids in preventing dehydration! These are the only roaches I know of that produce this substance, even the adults have a thin layer of it! There really isn't anything like these in Blatticulture, they are so unique, really glad to be working with them!
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