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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/16/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Hey guys, it's been a little while since I posted here, I have some somber news to share. I have been dealing with some severe anxiety and depression issues for the past few months, and I kinda broke down a couple weeks ago. This hobby has unfortunately been causing me a lot more stress than happiness lately, possibly because I have too many species. It's also taken up almost all of my available time, and has prevented me from participating in any of my other hobbies or spending quality time with my family. So, after some soul-searching, I have decided to all but leave the hobby. I have gotten rid of almost all my invertebrates, and only plan to keep half a dozen species for now, (might even get rid of those though, time will tell). I will also be very minimally active here on the forums, so this is probably the last you will hear of me for a while. I want to give a huge thank you to everyone who's helped me along the way by supplying me with invertebrates, giving me husbandry info and advice, and those who just gave encouraging words. I will forever be grateful to all of you, and this forum in particular will always hold a very special place in my heart! Sincerely, -Tristan
  2. 5 points
    After collecting cockroach activity in my collection for more than a year now, I decided to make some graphs. Each graph is made up of 505056 datapoints (measurement every 10 seconds for 2 months). X-axis: hour of the day Y-Axis: Activity level and light level in the enclosure. Among the most interesting ones are the Therea bernhardti graphs. There you can see how the nymphs are active during the night, in contrast to the day-active adults.
  3. 4 points
    Managed to take some better pictures, couldn't withhold these...
  4. 3 points
    EDIT, Nov 2019: In light of new information, this species is NOT Hormetica apolinari, but Hormetica strumosa. A little less-showy than their relatives, Lucihormetica, these are a new addition to the hobby. What they lack in glowspots they make up for in size, robustness, the presence of prominent horns in males, and behavior. They are also quite prolific. Hands down one of the most rewarding species to keep.
  5. 3 points
    Today I saw a female Pseudoglomeris magnifica roach walking on the front glass. And upon close inspection I saw, much to my delight, three small nymphs clinging between their mother's legs. (picture is rather dull, due to the anti-reflection cross-polarization filters I had on my flash). I'm very happy with this!
  6. 3 points
    Hi there I've been a long time lurker of the forums but recently became more interested in actively participating in this hobby i currently own around 100+ species of roaches ranging from your run of the mill feeders to species rarely kept and even more rarely seen! my goal here is to get these rare species into peoples hands so we don't run the risk of losing any species from the us hobby as well as supplying my own base of knowledge collected over rearing so many of these neat little Arthropods ? soon I'll be posting a for sale list with a few neat species on there and I commonly have things posted on the us invert auction Facebook page so be sure to stay tuned for those!
  7. 3 points
    It might not be hot news, but I thought I'd share a new cockroach that I started breeding. Even when it comes to mainstream species, I always prefer to work with wildtypes (meaning strains that originated from known, wild populations) because I feel there is often too much mixing and hybridizing in the arthropod hobby, leading to weaker captive populations. Nymphs of this roach were collected in a small Honduran cave as an unidentified "Blaberus sp.". It appears to be a variety of Blaberus giganteus, with wide black banding and a darker color tone. Adults begin as white individuals but very quickly turn orange. The funny thing is that I never planned to keep B. giganteus. I avoided them due to their bad reputation - low tolerance for crowding and cannibalism. But this strain seems to be ok with it, I still have all the original adults sharing the space with hundreds of nymphs, and while their wings are no longer intact (well, they use them for courtship after all), they are still kicking. They seem to be very hardy.
  8. 3 points
    I just read on http://www.roachcrossing.com/major-life-updates-unanswered-e-mails-facebook-reboot-future/, that Kyle is getting things back in order. That's good news, especially for Kyle himself! I didn't know what had happened last year, but knowing know after reading his message, it has been quite a lot. Well, I wish Kyle all the best (and perhaps we should not swarm him with roach orders )! Kyle: if you happen to read this: Take you time, and I wish you all the best!
  9. 3 points
    Beautiful Blaberid from Panama. Males have glossy black wings while females lack wings.
  10. 3 points
    Here's a beautiful species from central FL. Their babies hatched yesterday!
  11. 3 points
    In case anyone was wondering, Corydidarum and Trichoblatta are now considered synonyms of Pseudoglomeris. Additionally, Corydidarum (Trichoblatta) pygmaea is now Perisphaerus pygmaeus. You can get the full article here.
  12. 2 points
    I managed to make some photographs of my new roaches: Corydidarum magnifica. The nymphs are still quite small (8mm / 0.31inch) and I took the photographs through the glass of their tank, so the quality isn't optimal.
  13. 2 points
    Thank you all for the kind words and encouragement, I really appreciate it! I regret to inform you all though that I have gotten rid of my collection and am leaving the hobby completely now. I tried just cutting my collection size down, but it appears I burnt myself out, I've lost my passion for keeping live invertebrates completely. I still love invertebrates, but I'd rather just look at pictures or observe them in their natural habitat than raise them myself. Maybe I'll get back into the hobby a few years down the line, who knows, but for now I think it's best if I take some time away from the hobby completely. Thank you everyone for all the help, kind words, and of course roaches you've provided me with over the years, this forum and everyone on it will always hold a special place in my heart! Goodbye, and keep on roaching! -Tristan
  14. 2 points
    Many thanks to @Hisserdude, @All About Arthropods, @stanislas, and countless others for making this possible
  15. 2 points
    @All About Arthropodssaid to me that the guy left roachworld and no longer sells things in the shop
  16. 2 points
    Hello friends!! There are pictures in internet of the genus Capucina that looks a little doubtful... the main difference between Capucina and the rest of Zetoborinae genus is the soft pubescence over their tegmina. Some time ago I've collected some mystery Zetoborinae nymphs that I though was some kind of Lanxoblatta; but surprise!! now I have my first Capucina group ? I'm not sure if C.patula (only species in the genus), but as soon as one adult die I'll check it out. NOTE: Take a look over the right corner of the pronotum in this adult... when they get wet, their pubescence absorbs the moisture and change the colour (...gets darker, like a cloth ? ) Enjoy it! ?
  17. 2 points
    Easiest way I look at it is for burrowing species that aren't super sensitive to overcrowding(so every burrowing species you listed except the centurio) when the substrate is about 50% roaches to 50% actual substrate it's time to upgrade, for terrestrial species I mostly just go with when they look cramped, which is obviously subjective but basically if to you it looks like they are sorta just piling all over eachother it's time to give them more room. For winged species another good indicator of not enough space isn't if you start noticing wings are being bitten a lot more often.
  18. 2 points
    Two males (female looks just like male, but is noticeably larger and somehow bulkier). Surprizingly, one with orange blotch is by far not freshly molted.
  19. 2 points
    Hello everybody ! I'm an illustrator and I'm currently working on a book about insects (kind of a pop-up book for children in which you can lift the wings of an insect to see underneath for example). I would like to feature in this book the beautiful Simandoa Conserfariam, but unfortunately, I cannot find a picture with a view under the elytras of the full abdomen and the wings (I read that the simandoa have fully developed wings). I contacted shops and even a Natural History Museum, but in vain ! (the museum didn't have a specimen) So I was wondering if one of you guys had some informations on that subject ! Hope I'm posting this in the right forum :) Thank you !!
  20. 2 points
    Yep, I've observed this occurance in Parcoblatta pennsylvanica and I bet the same could be true for some other winged roaches as well. Hmm, just slightly on the cooler side then. Exactly how dark is your adult? I kept mine a bit colder than that (at the time the warmest things got were around 70 F I believe) and my adults were nearly solid black so I assume yours might be a bit lighter in color? Now that I'm keeping mine on the warmer side, I'm not seeing any black or even mostly black adults.
  21. 2 points
    Any Pokemon fans here? Sun and Moon finally gave us a roach pokemon with Pheromosa and it instantly became one of my favorite Pokemon. I love how not only is it powerful, but is also portrayed as beautiful and clean! It reminds me of a Blaberus sp. in particular, especially the coloring on the shiny version. I want to cosplay a humanized/gijinka Pheromosa and do a photoshoot with some of my caves.
  22. 2 points
    Disclaimer: Not trying to argue; comments below are for the sake of myth-prevention Periplaneta americana, the American roach, has been proven to have an excellent memory. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.2108/zsj.18.21&ved=2ahUKEwi-v8y4uuraAhXPtVkKHaZJAt0QFjAAegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw2R56gPNwnVV_UMJIwIsV_h Research has also shown that Blattella germanica (German) has long-term memory and the ability to remember cage landmarks for visual navigation. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/255641206_HOW_DO_BLATTELLA_GERMANICA_L_AGGREGATE I don't know what species you keep, but: These two houseroaches belong to different superfamilies and are built similarly to most roaches; it is thus rather safe to assume that other roaches with "typical" habits have similarly good memory capacity as well (of course, some roaches with extremely unusual biology might have reduced memory capacity to improve biological fitness). Conclusion: Your roaches' apparent poor memory is probably not a poor memory at all. One likely possibility is that they are simply just being instinctively paranoid (better to err on the side of caution) and are thus too timid to habituate to your handling when you lack food.
  23. 2 points
    awww poor roachies, they just want their chicken like the rest of us. teehehehe
  24. 2 points
    So far it looks like Corydidarum magnifica is mostly active during the day, and much less at night (diurnality). They often wander over objects, making them quite visible. I wonder if their shiny colors and looks are a kind of mimicry for some kind of foul tasting beetle in their natural habitat?
  25. 2 points
    In my opinion roach chow is the best way to go i manly put oats, cereal, fish food and bee pollen in my roach chow, that way you can control what Is going in there diet, and it is much healthier, especially if you feed reptiles I would strongly recommend during roach chow, I could even make some up and sell some to you, cape cod roaches sells it as well. I’ll list off the dry foods you mentioned from worst to best cat food, dog food, chick feed and fish food
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