Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/16/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Hey guys, it's been a little while since I posted here, I have some somber news to share. I have been dealing with some severe anxiety and depression issues for the past few months, and I kinda broke down a couple weeks ago. This hobby has unfortunately been causing me a lot more stress than happiness lately, possibly because I have too many species. It's also taken up almost all of my available time, and has prevented me from participating in any of my other hobbies or spending quality time with my family. So, after some soul-searching, I have decided to all but leave the hobby. I have gotten rid of almost all my invertebrates, and only plan to keep half a dozen species for now, (might even get rid of those though, time will tell). I will also be very minimally active here on the forums, so this is probably the last you will hear of me for a while. I want to give a huge thank you to everyone who's helped me along the way by supplying me with invertebrates, giving me husbandry info and advice, and those who just gave encouraging words. I will forever be grateful to all of you, and this forum in particular will always hold a very special place in my heart! Sincerely, -Tristan
  2. 5 points
    After collecting cockroach activity in my collection for more than a year now, I decided to make some graphs. Each graph is made up of 505056 datapoints (measurement every 10 seconds for 2 months). X-axis: hour of the day Y-Axis: Activity level and light level in the enclosure. Among the most interesting ones are the Therea bernhardti graphs. There you can see how the nymphs are active during the night, in contrast to the day-active adults.
  3. 4 points
    Managed to take some better pictures, couldn't withhold these...
  4. 3 points
    EDIT, Nov 2019: In light of new information, this species is NOT Hormetica apolinari, but Hormetica strumosa. A little less-showy than their relatives, Lucihormetica, these are a new addition to the hobby. What they lack in glowspots they make up for in size, robustness, the presence of prominent horns in males, and behavior. They are also quite prolific. Hands down one of the most rewarding species to keep.
  5. 3 points
    Today I saw a female Pseudoglomeris magnifica roach walking on the front glass. And upon close inspection I saw, much to my delight, three small nymphs clinging between their mother's legs. (picture is rather dull, due to the anti-reflection cross-polarization filters I had on my flash). I'm very happy with this!
  6. 3 points
    Hi there I've been a long time lurker of the forums but recently became more interested in actively participating in this hobby i currently own around 100+ species of roaches ranging from your run of the mill feeders to species rarely kept and even more rarely seen! my goal here is to get these rare species into peoples hands so we don't run the risk of losing any species from the us hobby as well as supplying my own base of knowledge collected over rearing so many of these neat little Arthropods ? soon I'll be posting a for sale list with a few neat species on there and I commonly have things posted on the us invert auction Facebook page so be sure to stay tuned for those!
  7. 3 points
    It might not be hot news, but I thought I'd share a new cockroach that I started breeding. Even when it comes to mainstream species, I always prefer to work with wildtypes (meaning strains that originated from known, wild populations) because I feel there is often too much mixing and hybridizing in the arthropod hobby, leading to weaker captive populations. Nymphs of this roach were collected in a small Honduran cave as an unidentified "Blaberus sp.". It appears to be a variety of Blaberus giganteus, with wide black banding and a darker color tone. Adults begin as white individuals but very quickly turn orange. The funny thing is that I never planned to keep B. giganteus. I avoided them due to their bad reputation - low tolerance for crowding and cannibalism. But this strain seems to be ok with it, I still have all the original adults sharing the space with hundreds of nymphs, and while their wings are no longer intact (well, they use them for courtship after all), they are still kicking. They seem to be very hardy.
  8. 3 points
    I just read on http://www.roachcrossing.com/major-life-updates-unanswered-e-mails-facebook-reboot-future/, that Kyle is getting things back in order. That's good news, especially for Kyle himself! I didn't know what had happened last year, but knowing know after reading his message, it has been quite a lot. Well, I wish Kyle all the best (and perhaps we should not swarm him with roach orders )! Kyle: if you happen to read this: Take you time, and I wish you all the best!
  9. 3 points
    Beautiful Blaberid from Panama. Males have glossy black wings while females lack wings.
  10. 3 points
    Here's a beautiful species from central FL. Their babies hatched yesterday!
  11. 3 points
    In case anyone was wondering, Corydidarum and Trichoblatta are now considered synonyms of Pseudoglomeris. Additionally, Corydidarum (Trichoblatta) pygmaea is now Perisphaerus pygmaeus. You can get the full article here.
  12. 2 points
    I managed to make some photographs of my new roaches: Corydidarum magnifica. The nymphs are still quite small (8mm / 0.31inch) and I took the photographs through the glass of their tank, so the quality isn't optimal.
  13. 2 points
    A lot of people have been asking me about the species of Panchlora in culture, and why I price the white roaches differently than the others. More specifically, people wanted to know about their size difference. I took a photo to show you the sizes of Panchlora "white" and P. "speckled", compared to P. nivea. Please note that my P. nivea come from a wild population, so they might not be P. nivea at all, but their size is identical to P. nivea that is in culture. These are all unmated females. P. "speckled" is slightly bigger than P. nivea, and Panchlora "white" is even bigger. You can also see the color difference between the species, but I'll note that the light conditions for photographing them were not ideal. Panchlora are known to be very reflective. Besides the body color, you can also see differences in the color of their antennae.
  14. 2 points
    I have a particular fondness for roaches that a layperson might look at and ask "what is that?" instead of going "ew, a cockroach". Variety is the spice of life, and the variety of living things is a particularly good spice. I also like the round shapes. I know these aren't common species, but can anyone point me towards some care info on them? I'm trying to figure out something to keep in an Exo Terra 8x8x8 or 8x8x12. These three are looking like they might be possible candidates. I figure I need something fairly small, that doesn't need deep substrate (the most I can get in this is 2" without some juryrigging), that won't scatter everywhere or fly into my face when I open the tank. There's about a 1mm gap along the side edges of the door due to how it's constructed. If I really wanted to, I could silicone the door shut and just open it from the top, but I'd prefer something that can't squeeze out there. I could probably also rig something to make the substrate deeper if it was needed. I also want something that can be reliably left alone as long as it has food and moisture. For the bark roaches, it looks like they eat only apples and bark. I'd give them hardwood bark, we have pecan trees in the area. Would they eat dried apples, do you think? Not store-bought, just sliced thin and dried to jerky texture in the oven. Easier to just keep in a container next to the enclosure to feed them whenever they need it. How warm do they like to be? They look like they'd take decent advantage of climbing space, running up and down things, and might be especially visible from the sides through the glass. The pillbug roaches, I can't find much data on. Roachcrossing says they need good ventilation, moist air, and will eat apples, and I know @Hisserdude had some at one point. Does anyone have any advice on them?
  15. 2 points
    They are absolutely capable of noticing differences, changing their behavior, learning, and maybe even having basic moods or emotions, but I do think what is going on with them is not quite as complicated as what causes behavior for you or I. We are sort of designed to explain things in terms that we understand, so its very normal to assume another animal (or even another person) thinks the way we do, but it is rarely the case. I imagine he simply has less reason to do things now that there are no mature females around. He will likely perk up if other adult females are around, or when the nymphs get bigger. He might even be more active if there was another male for him to have territorial disputes with, although they may also fight too much. Right now he is likely just chilling, waiting for something that actually requires behavior. I don't think he is depressed, but they are somewhat social species, so I think they probably do the best when they live in groups.
  16. 2 points
    Sorry for the extra late reply lol. They are definitely hissers, but you can't really ID them from nymphs, and if they are unlabeled you might not even be able to tell what they are once mature...
  17. 2 points
    Chrysomelids are almost never kept. I've only seen larvae of a few different species a few times in my life. These are from the biggest species in my area (1/2"). This is a '"common" species but I'm not certain I've ever seen the larvae before except in photos. Last time I found some chrysomelid larvae was about ten years ago. They were on a small cottonwood or aspen tree and I went back to grab some the next day, but something had eaten them.
  18. 2 points
    Hi! I’m new to this forum and excited to be here! There are a lot of gorgeous and fascinating roaches out there and I’m looking forward to learning about them and their care from all who participate in this forum. My own experience in roach keeping is limited, but growing. I have in the past and am currently raising a dubia roach colony that is used as feeders. I also recently purchased nymphs of Peppered, Orange Spot and Question Mark roaches through “Bugs in Cyberspace” and these animals are being enjoyed as pets and - where appropriate and the animals tolerate the handling, will be used (when grown), as ambassadors for educational programs. In the future, I hope to expand my roach collection as my knowledge expands. Eventually, I’d love to have complimentary mixed colonies co-habitating in single tanks with other insects. I believe this will make a dynamic presentation for others and me.
  19. 2 points
    Hello there friends! ? I use to mix different species (...that apparently could live together —similar environmental necessities, non-aggressive behaviour & the most important, no possibilities of hybridisation) This time was Phortioeca phoraspoides & Elliptorhina chopardi... and well, they couldn't be doing better. Actually, I would say that the group of P.phoraspoides living with E.chopardi are doing better than the group with their own cage. Which made me understand finally the better way to keep these very hardy flat-roache's species ? ...keep them dry, ventilated but with a good source of juicy veggies. That was a surprise... because they have some moisture around in their habitat. But wouldn't be the first time that one of my species do better in captivity when kept a little dryer than in their habitat. Cheers! ?
  20. 2 points
    Hey Man, it's not an issue - it's just Time I've lost and sold my collections repeatedly, 'cause of wives, children, army services, long-time errands etc., etc.. Then I've returned - and beasts have returned, too - some new, some old, but inevitably. Now I'm 47, my elder children're 23 and 22, my young daughter is 2, and 5 yrs ago I've brought a termites colony from a trip to Vietnam And now I've half of a room tightly packed with enclosures So - it's smth like Midi-chlorians in your blood - if you have it, you can't deal without all this bugmatters
  21. 2 points
    Yep, I've observed this occurance in Parcoblatta pennsylvanica and I bet the same could be true for some other winged roaches as well. Hmm, just slightly on the cooler side then. Exactly how dark is your adult? I kept mine a bit colder than that (at the time the warmest things got were around 70 F I believe) and my adults were nearly solid black so I assume yours might be a bit lighter in color? Now that I'm keeping mine on the warmer side, I'm not seeing any black or even mostly black adults.
  22. 2 points
    Disclaimer: Not trying to argue; comments below are for the sake of myth-prevention Periplaneta americana, the American roach, has been proven to have an excellent memory. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.2108/zsj.18.21&ved=2ahUKEwi-v8y4uuraAhXPtVkKHaZJAt0QFjAAegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw2R56gPNwnVV_UMJIwIsV_h Research has also shown that Blattella germanica (German) has long-term memory and the ability to remember cage landmarks for visual navigation. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/255641206_HOW_DO_BLATTELLA_GERMANICA_L_AGGREGATE I don't know what species you keep, but: These two houseroaches belong to different superfamilies and are built similarly to most roaches; it is thus rather safe to assume that other roaches with "typical" habits have similarly good memory capacity as well (of course, some roaches with extremely unusual biology might have reduced memory capacity to improve biological fitness). Conclusion: Your roaches' apparent poor memory is probably not a poor memory at all. One likely possibility is that they are simply just being instinctively paranoid (better to err on the side of caution) and are thus too timid to habituate to your handling when you lack food.
  23. 2 points
  24. 2 points
    So far it looks like Corydidarum magnifica is mostly active during the day, and much less at night (diurnality). They often wander over objects, making them quite visible. I wonder if their shiny colors and looks are a kind of mimicry for some kind of foul tasting beetle in their natural habitat?
  25. 2 points
    In my opinion roach chow is the best way to go i manly put oats, cereal, fish food and bee pollen in my roach chow, that way you can control what Is going in there diet, and it is much healthier, especially if you feed reptiles I would strongly recommend during roach chow, I could even make some up and sell some to you, cape cod roaches sells it as well. I’ll list off the dry foods you mentioned from worst to best cat food, dog food, chick feed and fish food
×