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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/21/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Managed to take some better pictures, couldn't withhold these...
  2. 2 points
    They are great. I'm happy with the morph, and I started the colony I intend to use for sale 2 weeks ago
  3. 2 points
    Found this photo and I wanted to share. 😋
  4. 2 points
    Dr. Darby Proctor, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Florida Institute of Technology has recently started using cockroaches to teach principles of psychology and neuroscience. Article and video below: https://adastra.fit.edu/blog/research/florida-tech-discovery-magazine-spring-2019-buggin-out/ I met Darby at a conference last week, were we were both presenting some of our cockroach research. The conference was near her school, so she actually was able to bring some of her discoid cockroaches! It was my first time seeing discoids in person. I now have "other roach envy." I know a number of labs that are investigating using hissing cockroaches for similar work, but generally I find them too lethargic. I have made some good progress with my research as well, and just received a grant to continue the work, though I do not yet have any fun videos to show yet.
  5. 2 points
    I have a particular fondness for roaches that a layperson might look at and ask "what is that?" instead of going "ew, a cockroach". Variety is the spice of life, and the variety of living things is a particularly good spice. I also like the round shapes. I know these aren't common species, but can anyone point me towards some care info on them? I'm trying to figure out something to keep in an Exo Terra 8x8x8 or 8x8x12. These three are looking like they might be possible candidates. I figure I need something fairly small, that doesn't need deep substrate (the most I can get in this is 2" without some juryrigging), that won't scatter everywhere or fly into my face when I open the tank. There's about a 1mm gap along the side edges of the door due to how it's constructed. If I really wanted to, I could silicone the door shut and just open it from the top, but I'd prefer something that can't squeeze out there. I could probably also rig something to make the substrate deeper if it was needed. I also want something that can be reliably left alone as long as it has food and moisture. For the bark roaches, it looks like they eat only apples and bark. I'd give them hardwood bark, we have pecan trees in the area. Would they eat dried apples, do you think? Not store-bought, just sliced thin and dried to jerky texture in the oven. Easier to just keep in a container next to the enclosure to feed them whenever they need it. How warm do they like to be? They look like they'd take decent advantage of climbing space, running up and down things, and might be especially visible from the sides through the glass. The pillbug roaches, I can't find much data on. Roachcrossing says they need good ventilation, moist air, and will eat apples, and I know @Hisserdude had some at one point. Does anyone have any advice on them?
  6. 2 points
    Hello! I want to show you some of my more uncommon [here in Europe] roach species. My foto size reduction is slightly better than in my last topic and I will further try to improve this. Melanozosteria nitida BRUNNER VON WATTENWYL 1865 (from Khai Sok in Thailand) Only under lights more redish than black, but look at the defensive secretion on their last abdominal segments. They are incredible fast runners. Thorax porcellana SAUSSURE 1862 (from India and Sri Lanka) Beautyful species from the Epilamprinae subfamily. Most fascinating are the baby cockroaches below their mothers wings for the first weeks. First rank breakout artists.
  7. 2 points
    Just FYI, I've created a new blog dedicated to caresheets, specifically for invertebrates that I've successfully bred myself. This includes a few of the more obscure invertebrates out there, and of course, plenty of cockroaches! Stay tuned for new caresheets posted periodically! Invertebrate Dude Caresheets
  8. 2 points
    Thank you! Yeah they do look a lot like oblongonota with these spots. I was looking at a picture with the different horns of males but I can't tell the differences between hybrids and species for the life of me. I'm certainly better at isopod identification :d At least they're just goth like me 💀 I hope their offspring will be as gorgeous as they are.
  9. 2 points
    They are absolutely capable of noticing differences, changing their behavior, learning, and maybe even having basic moods or emotions, but I do think what is going on with them is not quite as complicated as what causes behavior for you or I. We are sort of designed to explain things in terms that we understand, so its very normal to assume another animal (or even another person) thinks the way we do, but it is rarely the case. I imagine he simply has less reason to do things now that there are no mature females around. He will likely perk up if other adult females are around, or when the nymphs get bigger. He might even be more active if there was another male for him to have territorial disputes with, although they may also fight too much. Right now he is likely just chilling, waiting for something that actually requires behavior. I don't think he is depressed, but they are somewhat social species, so I think they probably do the best when they live in groups.
  10. 2 points
    I wanted to try the differential grasshopper, but in my area the two striped is much more common. Its nearly nationwide and seems to prefer areas with tall wild lettuce (Lactuca virosa) and sunflowers. They are supposed to be in PA. Once together they bred readily in captivity, in a butterfly tent, with regular fresh foods including wild lettuce flowers. A study back in the 50's or 60's found the nymphs could be taught to eat a commercial style feed to avoid the hassles of fresh greens. I have some references somewhere if anyones needs them. egg cases in peat
  11. 2 points
    I dug out my Polyphaga saussurei collection, to see how many I have at the moment. 3 Adults and many nymphs. And while they were together, I noticed them moving almost synchronous:
  12. 2 points
    Sorry for the extra late reply lol. They are definitely hissers, but you can't really ID them from nymphs, and if they are unlabeled you might not even be able to tell what they are once mature...
  13. 2 points
    Today I saw a female Pseudoglomeris magnifica roach walking on the front glass. And upon close inspection I saw, much to my delight, three small nymphs clinging between their mother's legs. (picture is rather dull, due to the anti-reflection cross-polarization filters I had on my flash). I'm very happy with this!
  14. 2 points
    Thank you all for the kind words and encouragement, I really appreciate it! I regret to inform you all though that I have gotten rid of my collection and am leaving the hobby completely now. I tried just cutting my collection size down, but it appears I burnt myself out, I've lost my passion for keeping live invertebrates completely. I still love invertebrates, but I'd rather just look at pictures or observe them in their natural habitat than raise them myself. Maybe I'll get back into the hobby a few years down the line, who knows, but for now I think it's best if I take some time away from the hobby completely. Thank you everyone for all the help, kind words, and of course roaches you've provided me with over the years, this forum and everyone on it will always hold a special place in my heart! Goodbye, and keep on roaching! -Tristan
  15. 1 point
    Finally got some of these beauties, one of the first to keep them in the US, fingers crossed they'll breed for me! Here are some pictures of a couple nymphs!
  16. 1 point
    not necessarily just roach related but does anyone know anywhere to get cheap cork bark/log/wood hides? i keep meaning to get more but i cant justify spending ten bucks on amazon plus shipping for a stick. i would just go dig around locally and find something to boil or whatever but i dont trust anything i could get around here. im really just trying to find hides and logs or maybe big sticks for my roaches to play in as well as the new lizard friend who will be staying with me for awhile as a favor to a human friend. ive looked on a lot of pet websites but theyre either steep in price or just those logs that youd see at like...petco or something. im still slowing changing my set ups to be more naturalistic even though i am definitely not able to keep up with a bioactive tank. thanks!
  17. 1 point
    Well yeah, but if the species is voracious enough to need cuttlebone to chew on when using them as cleaner crews, I'd avoid using them altogether... 😛 Most of my isopod species showed next to no cannibalism even without cuttlebones, but then again I made sure they had plenty of protein rich feed and veggies in addition to their leaf litter, whereas I know of some people who only use the latter in their colonies and expect them to do well...
  18. 1 point
    What isopod species did you use? The species can make a world of a difference. They also need cuttlefish bone to not start nibbling on the roaches, and Porcellio scaber should generally be avoided as a clean up crew for simply being too aggressive. Some species breed like mad and could stress roaches by their sheer numbers while others are slower breeders and more mellow, then there's substrate dwellers and species that live on top of the substrate, there's really a lot of different ones.
  19. 1 point
    Yeah most burrowers are unaffected by tropical pink springtails, it's the non-burrowers that can get stressed by the constant tactile contact. Smaller springtail species like the little silver ones are compatible with every roach species I know of.
  20. 1 point
    Ah, well then the abstract painting can be on your face! It's the hot new makeup trend; live and unrestrained roaches.
  21. 1 point
    Orange slices seem to be the generally accepted favorite food of many roach species, hissers one of them! They also seem to love turtle hatchling food (strangely specific) and will eat cracked bird seed.
  22. 1 point
    Hey! well... any organic substrate should be Ok (like coconut fiber) Do not use Buffalo Worms!... they will bite the ooths of Shelfordella lateralis, but springtails is completely fine if you plan to keep the substrate slightly moist. It depends on how much you use 🙂 2K nymphs would be a lot for myself (It depends on how much you need to use every time)... I mean... you could get a colony of thousands in a short time starting with 100 nymphs. They breed like crazy!!
  23. 1 point
    Well good luck man, hopefully those giant Panchlora will start exploding for you soon! Perhaps just try offering less leaf litter, I don't think Panchlora nymphs absolutely need it, but most isopods breed much less without them.
  24. 1 point
    So far it looks like Corydidarum magnifica is mostly active during the day, and much less at night (diurnality). They often wander over objects, making them quite visible. I wonder if their shiny colors and looks are a kind of mimicry for some kind of foul tasting beetle in their natural habitat?
  25. 1 point
    If you keep adults below 72F you'll probably never see a nymph but they can grow at cooler temps. Like Blaberus giganteus, some adults die within a day of molting. It is one of the best species! Good luck.
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