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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/18/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Today I saw a female Pseudoglomeris magnifica roach walking on the front glass. And upon close inspection I saw, much to my delight, three small nymphs clinging between their mother's legs. (picture is rather dull, due to the anti-reflection cross-polarization filters I had on my flash). I'm very happy with this!
  2. 3 points
    Managed to take some better pictures, couldn't withhold these...
  3. 2 points
    Sorry for the extra late reply lol. They are definitely hissers, but you can't really ID them from nymphs, and if they are unlabeled you might not even be able to tell what they are once mature...
  4. 2 points
    Chrysomelids are almost never kept. I've only seen larvae of a few different species a few times in my life. These are from the biggest species in my area (1/2"). This is a '"common" species but I'm not certain I've ever seen the larvae before except in photos. Last time I found some chrysomelid larvae was about ten years ago. They were on a small cottonwood or aspen tree and I went back to grab some the next day, but something had eaten them.
  5. 2 points
    Thank you all for the kind words and encouragement, I really appreciate it! I regret to inform you all though that I have gotten rid of my collection and am leaving the hobby completely now. I tried just cutting my collection size down, but it appears I burnt myself out, I've lost my passion for keeping live invertebrates completely. I still love invertebrates, but I'd rather just look at pictures or observe them in their natural habitat than raise them myself. Maybe I'll get back into the hobby a few years down the line, who knows, but for now I think it's best if I take some time away from the hobby completely. Thank you everyone for all the help, kind words, and of course roaches you've provided me with over the years, this forum and everyone on it will always hold a special place in my heart! Goodbye, and keep on roaching! -Tristan
  6. 2 points
    Hi! I’m new to this forum and excited to be here! There are a lot of gorgeous and fascinating roaches out there and I’m looking forward to learning about them and their care from all who participate in this forum. My own experience in roach keeping is limited, but growing. I have in the past and am currently raising a dubia roach colony that is used as feeders. I also recently purchased nymphs of Peppered, Orange Spot and Question Mark roaches through “Bugs in Cyberspace” and these animals are being enjoyed as pets and - where appropriate and the animals tolerate the handling, will be used (when grown), as ambassadors for educational programs. In the future, I hope to expand my roach collection as my knowledge expands. Eventually, I’d love to have complimentary mixed colonies co-habitating in single tanks with other insects. I believe this will make a dynamic presentation for others and me.
  7. 2 points
    Hisserdude has had some improvements in his "white" colony but they still aren't a huge bustling colony and are still at a very precarious position in the us hobby, hopefully if the colony continues to do well and the new dietary changes he has made work out I'll be trading him one of my very rare species for some so we can start spreading this difficult but beautiful species within the hobby?
  8. 2 points
    I remember when I took a break between marriages. I still had a couple bugs and I still worked on my insect photography and website, but it really took things down a few notches. I had my bugs in a storage unit for a long time. Lost a lot of things due to lack of time to get over there. Phyllium hausleithneri and P. siccifolium, to name just a few. I remember Orin saying I was the only person that ever came back. I didn't really realize I was ever gone, but I did what I had to do and I got back to what I loved when it was time. Do the same and you can count on the forum to be here when you return. I assume those Simandoa I sent you earlier this year made the cut. Too bad you don't live one state to the left. I'm hiring in September. Take care, man!
  9. 2 points
    Hello there friends! ? I use to mix different species (...that apparently could live together —similar environmental necessities, non-aggressive behaviour & the most important, no possibilities of hybridisation) This time was Phortioeca phoraspoides & Elliptorhina chopardi... and well, they couldn't be doing better. Actually, I would say that the group of P.phoraspoides living with E.chopardi are doing better than the group with their own cage. Which made me understand finally the better way to keep these very hardy flat-roache's species ? ...keep them dry, ventilated but with a good source of juicy veggies. That was a surprise... because they have some moisture around in their habitat. But wouldn't be the first time that one of my species do better in captivity when kept a little dryer than in their habitat. Cheers! ?
  10. 2 points
    Many thanks to @Hisserdude, @All About Arthropods, @stanislas, and countless others for making this possible
  11. 2 points
    @All About Arthropodssaid to me that the guy left roachworld and no longer sells things in the shop
  12. 2 points
    Hello friends!! There are pictures in internet of the genus Capucina that looks a little doubtful... the main difference between Capucina and the rest of Zetoborinae genus is the soft pubescence over their tegmina. Some time ago I've collected some mystery Zetoborinae nymphs that I though was some kind of Lanxoblatta; but surprise!! now I have my first Capucina group ? I'm not sure if C.patula (only species in the genus), but as soon as one adult die I'll check it out. NOTE: Take a look over the right corner of the pronotum in this adult... when they get wet, their pubescence absorbs the moisture and change the colour (...gets darker, like a cloth ? ) Enjoy it! ?
  13. 2 points
    It might not be hot news, but I thought I'd share a new cockroach that I started breeding. Even when it comes to mainstream species, I always prefer to work with wildtypes (meaning strains that originated from known, wild populations) because I feel there is often too much mixing and hybridizing in the arthropod hobby, leading to weaker captive populations. Nymphs of this roach were collected in a small Honduran cave as an unidentified "Blaberus sp.". It appears to be a variety of Blaberus giganteus, with wide black banding and a darker color tone. Adults begin as white individuals but very quickly turn orange. The funny thing is that I never planned to keep B. giganteus. I avoided them due to their bad reputation - low tolerance for crowding and cannibalism. But this strain seems to be ok with it, I still have all the original adults sharing the space with hundreds of nymphs, and while their wings are no longer intact (well, they use them for courtship after all), they are still kicking. They seem to be very hardy.
  14. 2 points
    After collecting cockroach activity in my collection for more than a year now, I decided to make some graphs. Each graph is made up of 505056 datapoints (measurement every 10 seconds for 2 months). X-axis: hour of the day Y-Axis: Activity level and light level in the enclosure. Among the most interesting ones are the Therea bernhardti graphs. There you can see how the nymphs are active during the night, in contrast to the day-active adults.
  15. 1 point
    Unfortunately she is a Gromphadorhina hybrid; they can vary much in color from individual to individual. The male features much more of the classic MHC coloration, but he is still almost surely a hybrid as well since he wasn't gotten from one of the couple select sources for pure G.portentosa such as Kyle Kandilian of Roachcrossing.
  16. 1 point
    Hey guys, it's been a little while since I posted here, I have some somber news to share. I have been dealing with some severe anxiety and depression issues for the past few months, and I kinda broke down a couple weeks ago. This hobby has unfortunately been causing me a lot more stress than happiness lately, possibly because I have too many species. It's also taken up almost all of my available time, and has prevented me from participating in any of my other hobbies or spending quality time with my family. So, after some soul-searching, I have decided to all but leave the hobby. I have gotten rid of almost all my invertebrates, and only plan to keep half a dozen species for now, (might even get rid of those though, time will tell). I will also be very minimally active here on the forums, so this is probably the last you will hear of me for a while. I want to give a huge thank you to everyone who's helped me along the way by supplying me with invertebrates, giving me husbandry info and advice, and those who just gave encouraging words. I will forever be grateful to all of you, and this forum in particular will always hold a very special place in my heart! Sincerely, -Tristan
  17. 1 point
    Hi Everyone, recently I put some big (dead) maple leaves to some of my cockroach enclosures just as decoration and climbing surface, but some species seem to be eating them (e.g: Hemiblabera brunneri, Elliptorhina javanica). Do you give dead leaves as food for your roaches? If yes, which tree species would you recommend? Thanks a lot and happy new year!
  18. 1 point
    Dear friends of roaches, I have an all male colony of about twenty g. portentosa who appear to be displaying mating behaviors. At night, they hiss loudly and fight constantly, appearing to defend prime territory in their enclosure. The largest males especially then attempt end-to-end mating with other males, pushing out from their rear what I assume to be their sex organ. They try for about ten seconds while hissing before moving on, generally to fight another male. They appear healthy and the behavior is only potentially problematic for me as it is amazingly loud and goes all night. In the day they are relatively docile and quiet. In terms of environment, they live in a twenty gallon tank with many cork rounds and egg cartons to hide in which I've heard should be sufficient, but do they possibly need more space? They have constant access to dog food, fresh vegetables and water. Their enclosure doesn't mold over and I live in a warm area. The obvious explanation is a female is among them but I have twice sorted through every one by hand; they all have large protuberances and the additional sections on the underside of their abdomens. Is it possible they're just exhibiting homosexuality? Has anyone else seen this behavior in an all male colony? I can attempt to create footage of this behavior if people are interested. Thanks a million,
  19. 1 point
    Have you tried freezing these for longer shelf life? I usually spend a month or two traveling each year, during which time my SO has to care for all my bugs. I've been looking for an inexpensive yet healthy food that will save for a month or longer.
  20. 1 point
    Thank you! I appreciate that response
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    Awesome! That so cool looking! I like the contrast between the species coloration. Do you ever keep more than two species together? Thanks, Arthroverts
  23. 1 point
    I keep mine bone dry and about 85-90 degrees. They get water crystals, but only occasionally do I mist them. I keep them on a mix of coco fiber and shaved aspen (snake bedding) with A. diaperinus for clean up.
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    I'm curious if you were able to raise the specimen from the last pic to adult. I have a hunch that it's a nymph of Plectoptera poeyi but I'm not 100% sure about this.
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