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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/06/2019 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    Got the opportunity to draw some of my roaches for a school assignment These are just sketches, but I would love to do some nicely rendered art of them soon. I would love to see more art of bugs while I'm here! If any of y'all wanna share your art here, please do
  2. 3 points
    EDIT, Nov 2019: In light of new information, this species is NOT Hormetica apolinari, but Hormetica strumosa. A little less-showy than their relatives, Lucihormetica, these are a new addition to the hobby. What they lack in glowspots they make up for in size, robustness, the presence of prominent horns in males, and behavior. They are also quite prolific. Hands down one of the most rewarding species to keep.
  3. 3 points
    I get on occasionally dang itπŸ˜‚ but yep like @All About Arthropods mentioned i have one of the last rhabdoblatta colonies in the states and shockingly i actually don't charge that much as i just want them in people's collections so next time I almost lose mine its not a full on panic mode.. But atm the epilamprids I'm working with are Opistaplatia orientalis-red and black roach-beautiful adults and relatively active at all life stages but mostly stick around in leaf litter Decoralampra fulgencioi-nymphs are excellent bark mimics and adults are shiny beetle mimics with rove like characteristics semi arboreal at all life stages Rhabdoblatta formosana-one of the most arboreal ones but also the fastest breeding and most sensitive to waste build up. Epilamprinae sp "borneo"-basically chunky rhabdoblatta that are just as arboreal as actual rhabdo but more impressive looking and slower breeders Epilampra maya-breed at a relatively slow rate if kept more towards room temp stunning looking shiny nymphs and panchlora-esque adults moderately sensitive to waste buildup but not as bad as rhabdoblatta And finally my favourite(and slowest breeding/rarest/most expensive) epilamprid-thorax porcellana or what ive nicknamed Vampire roaches-these guys look cool at every life stage with adults having neat pyramid shaped wings and nymphs blending in seamlessly with most organic display items also the most arboreal(in my experience tbey only breed well if kept like arboreal tropical mantids) but tbe coolest part? The newborn nymphs hide under the moms pyramid wings until their first molt feeding on the moms blood with a specialized pair of jaws they molt off after leaving moms back!
  4. 3 points
    Please report vulgarity and trolling. Circumventing filters by posting links to overly vulgar language or pornographic sites will result in a permanent and immediate ban. Please don't let it go unnoticed and unreported.
  5. 2 points
    Finally got some of these beauties, one of the first to keep them in the US, fingers crossed they'll breed for me! Here are some pictures of a couple nymphs!
  6. 2 points
    American Cockroach Society Wear I'm surprised this still works, it hasn't been updated in nine years.
  7. 2 points
    On an opposite note, I remember when I use to provide pest control for a penitentiary. The basement of the facility was where al the access to the plumbing and electrical areas were. It was a constant 90 degrees and the humidity was equally as high. There were massive colonies of American roaches living there. The building was supported by concrete pillars and they would hang on these like herds of sheep. Moving as a group (not scattering)if you shown a flash light on them. The interesting thing is this area was lit 24/7. The did not hang out in the dim areas. We sprayed once a week and there were never in dead to be found. I almost think they lived solely off the dead we created. So it appears once roaches get used to a particular light cycle it is of little matter to them.
  8. 2 points
    Plants can survive with roaches in the short to medium term, provided you keep your roaches well fed at all times. I have kept ficus quercifolia with some rainforest species for a year, but the Vivarium eventually got taken over by hissers and they dug it up and chewed the fresh shoot tips. Cheers from Bill.
  9. 2 points
    Yeah larger nymph and adult P.saussurei are amazingly calm when handled, one of my favorite species for sure! 😁
  10. 2 points
    Welcome! I'd suggest G. oblongonota, G. "princisia big" and Macropanesthia. I think I have flexivitta still listed on my last list. I originally got into roaches because you could find them for sale a long time ago (it could take you a decade to find ten different species) but nobody bred beetles and you certainly couldn't find them at a pet shop.
  11. 2 points
    Nice selection, fair warning though, adult male G.caffrorum are just about the most hyper roaches you'll come across in the hobby, and are fantastic fliers too...
  12. 2 points
    Exactly! The flashy stuff is good for luring people into the hobby, but once they've been hooked, it's easier to feel the fascination for nearly all species.
  13. 2 points
    Thanks @Hisserdude and @All About Arthropods ! Parcoblatta were actually some of the first i kept, I never knew they would be so great to have!
  14. 2 points
    I still have mine. I saw at least 2 dozen nymphs ranging from 2nd instar to 4th so they are doing well
  15. 2 points
    Shon, These are excellent. I could actually see something like this being used for scientific illustration (I have commissioned such illustrations before). One of my friends had to do similar sketches for a graduate entomology class and really enjoyed it, those were less holistic and more close ups of parts though. Keep it up. Hisserdude, yours are actually pretty good too. They mostly just lack shading. And I totally get the point about not being able to get the legs to look natural. I can get it if I copy an image closely, but free hand, I think I just don't 100% understand the legs and joints. They are so alien its hard to make sense of it sometimes.
  16. 2 points
    These are my best two IMO: The models:
  17. 2 points
    A lot of people have been asking me about the species of Panchlora in culture, and why I price the white roaches differently than the others. More specifically, people wanted to know about their size difference. I took a photo to show you the sizes of Panchlora "white" and P. "speckled", compared to P. nivea. Please note that my P. nivea come from a wild population, so they might not be P. nivea at all, but their size is identical to P. nivea that is in culture. These are all unmated females. P. "speckled" is slightly bigger than P. nivea, and Panchlora "white" is even bigger. You can also see the color difference between the species, but I'll note that the light conditions for photographing them were not ideal. Panchlora are known to be very reflective. Besides the body color, you can also see differences in the color of their antennae.
  18. 2 points
    Now, this is for zebra isopods (Armadillidium maculatum), but it would also work for small, non-climbing roaches. Or for climbing species if you had a snug lid and covered the holes with mesh. It has a lid (just a cut-out piece of stiff packaging plastic), but I took that off for the pic. 1-gallon plastic bowl, holes poked with a soldering iron. There are lots of good uses for goldfish bowls! But none of them are for housing any kind of fish, albeit maybe for an hour or two as temporary holding/display. That's how the myth about goldfish being kept in bowls came about- the people who 'invented' them, bred them into goldfish, would keep them in ponds. When they had guests, they would put a couple of goldfish in a bowl on a table for display, and the fish would stay in there just for a little while, as display. Visitors from elsewhere thought that goldfish were permanently housed in those bowls, and then at some point pop culture picked it up, and the image of a goldfish in a bowl became commonplace. Unfortunately for goldfish.
  19. 2 points
    It seems that most of the people who say to stay away from animal sources for protein are people who use roaches as feeders. If you read threads in here from people who keep roaches as pets then you will notice that most of them use dog food. Personally, I use a blend of seeds, nuts, and dried fruits. I always have these things on hand because of my diet, so I grind them up in a coffee grinder and feed it to the roaches. I don't know if anybody has done an actual study on how much protein is too much protein. If I remember correctly someone once posted an interview with a scientist that breeds roaches and he said that about 4% protein is all they need. But, hobbyists have been using dog food for years and it doesn't seem to have a negative effect on the roaches. Or at least nobody has noticed a negative effect to report to other hobbyists.
  20. 2 points
    Thank you! When my shipment of that species entered transit, it stayed there for around 2 weeks for some reason before finally being delivered to my house. It was one of the few really bad experiences I've had with USPS, but even though they were Ectobiids (which are typically much more fragile than other roaches), they all arrived alive.
  21. 2 points
    I found two logs full (out of about six logs I chose to look under) near Asheville, NC. I collected two adults and a number of nymphs. One of the adults was alone. The other adult was with some nymphs, but I think the nymphs were old enough to not need parental care. One of the adults One of the nymphs
  22. 2 points
    Welcome! D. punctata are similar to hissers in care but it's hard to get much production. You'd probably never see 800 at once no matter how much work you put into it. It is a unique species. The D. punctata I have originally came from Roth, but maybe somebody else has something very similar.
  23. 2 points
    Welcome! The "punctata" have actually been confirmed to indeed not be that species last year by taxonomist Dominic Evangelista, but rather Diploptera cf. minor. With that out of the way, they like good ventilation with a mostly dry enclosure and hot temps. πŸ™‚
  24. 2 points
  25. 2 points
    @Auz Nah this is a Blattid nymph, pretty sure it's just a dark Periplaneta fuliginosa nymph, they are pretty common in Georgia.
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