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All About Arthropods

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Everything posted by All About Arthropods

  1. All About Arthropods

    L. verrucosa stuck in shed

    Very sorry for the loss; I know it can be heart-breaking. Best of luck with the others going forward.
  2. All About Arthropods

    L. verrucosa stuck in shed

    Unfortunately, I think it's a goner if it's stuck so deeply into its old exoskeleton. 😥
  3. All About Arthropods

    Instagram

    100%! I love posting to my blog, but Instagram is so much quicker and it's so much more of an interactive experience.
  4. All About Arthropods

    Instagram

    This dusty thread is getting new life. 😛 Mine is @allaboutarthropods. Posting things from roaches to beetles to isopods almost daily!
  5. All About Arthropods

    Clean up crew questions

    I honestly would always recommend springtails as a clean-up crew as opposed to isopods since they're more inconspicuous most of the time and there's no risk of them chowing down on your roaches like there is with isopods. But if you were to use them as a clean-up crew, I recommend staying away from at least Porcellio spp. (more likely to much on the roaches) and Porcellionides spp. (way too prolific). You can indeed just throw them in without any extra care besides maybe tossing in a tad of extra food each feeding. Roaches will clean-up their own enclosures to some degree by partially-wholly consuming their own dead bodies, but don't mess with the feces at all. As to how you would know if you need a clean-up crew or not, that's hard to say. Some people show allergic reactions if waste builds up too much, but in general , the roaches themselves only really have issues if dead bodies accumulate, which can cause bacterial blooms and lead to infection (with some Epilamprids being outliers). Feces are really not much to worry about for the roaches and, in fact, I have multiple colonies of Pycnoscelus literally swimming around in their own feces right now and they're still doing magnificent.
  6. All About Arthropods

    New to roach keeping!

    Exactly! The flashy stuff is good for luring people into the hobby, but once they've been hooked, it's easier to feel the fascination for nearly all species.
  7. All About Arthropods

    Beetle lover turned roach fan!

    @Bmaines96 should have some flexivitta, but if not, you can also scroll the ad section on here. They're not extremely rare, so they pop up in lists from time to time Yeah, Kyle's either online or he isn't......unfortunately he's been just about completely offline for months now.
  8. All About Arthropods

    New to roach keeping!

    Welcome! As @Hisserdude stated, there's no such thing as too many questions; if you ever have any, ask away! Interesting to see Parcoblatta on your list so soon; they're all rather small and not "the most stunning of the stunning". I admit, I didn't really want to keep anything from the genus when I just broke in, but my eyes have been cleared and I can see the beauty and worthwhileness of keeping them now. Glad you've realized this already!
  9. All About Arthropods

    Arizona Inverts

    Excited to see 'em!
  10. All About Arthropods

    Arizona Inverts

    I wish! The tenebrionids there are a big target for me.
  11. All About Arthropods

    Beetle lover turned roach fan!

    Welcome! Almost all adult roaches are equipped with wings (including the ones you mentioned), but not all can really use them. I recommend Peppered roaches as @The Mantis Menagerie suggested; they're large, considerably docile, and adult males can only flutter downwards slightly, no true flying ability. Polyphaga spp. are also really great; P.saussurei is the most docile roach I've ever encountered and also get's quite large!
  12. All About Arthropods

    Hormetica strumosa

    Yeeeessss.
  13. All About Arthropods

    Hormetica strumosa

    I know of only 3 people that have them, including myself. The others being @Bmaines96 and @Cariblatta lutea. I have not gotten my female to drop any babies yet, but I know they have; hopefully their colonies are still doing well.
  14. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Porcellio scaber "White Out" Large individuals Medium-sized individuals Small individual Mixed-size individuals
  15. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    This photo thread won't be nearly as prolific as the one by the same name on the mantidforum since roaches are about 75% of what I keep at the moment, but nonetheless, it should be a fun, little place. Let's begin with my most miniscule and possibly most otherworldly beetle species, your favorite pest, Mezium affine. Mezium affine Adults
  16. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Porcellio sp. "Spiky - Canary"
  17. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Roachy Horde

    Good morning everyone. 😛 I've decided to start up a photo thread on my cockroach collection in its entirety here after finally learning how to easily share pictures thanks to the one and only, @Hisserdude. I'll go ahead and get things rolling with the current crowning jewel of my collection, my smallish nymph pair of Rhinoceros Roaches, Macropanesthia rhinoceros. Macropanesthia rhinoceros Smallish Male Nymph Smallish female nymph Smallish nymph pair
  18. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Roachy Horde

    Thank you! When my shipment of that species entered transit, it stayed there for around 2 weeks for some reason before finally being delivered to my house. It was one of the few really bad experiences I've had with USPS, but even though they were Ectobiids (which are typically much more fragile than other roaches), they all arrived alive.
  19. All About Arthropods

    Where to find these species-

    Supella will be a pest inside of houses, Cryptocercus will be inside of rather large, rotten logs, and I believe I.derepeltiformis should inhabit the same niches as Parcoblatta. I'm not exactly sure on the Ectobius though.
  20. All About Arthropods

    Arboreal Roaches?

    He isn't on here a ton, so I'll just answer for him. Within the U.S, no epilamprids are that commonly available, but you can find Opisthoplatia orientalis, Epilampra maya, and Rhabdoblatta formosana available at times; some new species may be available soon as well. @Bmaines96 may very well have the last R.formosana colony in the U.S right now and I believe he has all 3 epilamprids I mentioned available right now at very reasonable prices.
  21. All About Arthropods

    Nauphoeta cinerea as feeders

    They're a very easy species. They bred well for me at a range of temperatures, but heat of course speeds reproduction up. They shouldn't be without moisture for too long, but can take some dryness. A substrate can help with retaining moisture and if at least a corner of the enclosure is kept moist at all times, they should do just fine. The diet you mentioned would work great for them.
  22. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Armadillidium peraccae Large individuals Smaller individuals Mixed-size individuals
  23. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Armadillo officinalis Large individuals Mixed-size individuals
  24. All About Arthropods

    AAA's Swarm

    Gymnetis thula Adult Pupal chamber Adult and pupal chamber 3rd instar larva Suspected 1st instar larva Suspected 1st instar larva and 3rd instar larva
  25. All About Arthropods

    hello from kansas!

    Welcome! The "punctata" have actually been confirmed to indeed not be that species last year by taxonomist Dominic Evangelista, but rather Diploptera cf. minor. With that out of the way, they like good ventilation with a mostly dry enclosure and hot temps. 🙂
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