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Hisserdude

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Everything posted by Hisserdude

  1. And yes, I made a similar post back in 2017, but I figured I'd just go more in depth, since there still seems to be some confusion nowadays, (for example people in the US still call their Diploptera cf. minor "D.punctata", which is incorrect according to Evangelista, punctata are quite a bit bigger).
  2. So this might be old news to some of you, but just in case, I thought I'd reiterate some findings made a couple years back by the taxonomist Dominic Evangelista, and prominent European blatticulturist @Nicolas Rousseaux of the Cafarnarium. You can read the original post here on Facebook, but I figured I'd copy and paste the important parts here on the forum for those who don't frequent FB: Identification by D. Evangelista, based on animals reared in captivity, mainly strains from the Cafarnarium: Diploptera punctata ==> Diploptera cf. minor Uncertain, but it's obviously not Diploptera punctata, and Diploptera minor seems very close. Ischnoptera sp. “Costa Rica” ==> Ischnoptera rufa “Costa Rica" Symploce macroptera ==> Symploce incuriosa Other changes: Eublaberus sp. "Ivory" ==> Eublaberus cf. distanti "Ivory" Unconfirmed opinion from D. Evangelista. Eublaberus sp. “Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil” ==> Eublaberus cf. serranus “Brazil, Mato Grosso, Pantanal” Currently discussed on specialised forum. Gromphadorhina sp. "Ranomafana" ==> Gromphadorhina cf. portentosa "Madagascar, Ranomafana" The most probable species. Hemithyrsocera histrio ==> Hemithyrsocera vittata Now I've seen TYPES from these two species at the Museum, it's IMPOSSIBLE it's H. histrio. H. vittata, in picture (don't pay attention to the label, wich refers to an other individual in the box, bad framing due to the excitation of the situation) is highly, highly probable. Panesthia angustipennis angustipennis ==> Panesthia angustipennis angustipennis “Roth’s original stock” As this strain is diferent from other Panesthia angustipennis angustipennis and looks like Panesthia angustipennis cognata, this precision seems necessary. They are the descendants from the stock of Louis M. Roth.
  3. Hisserdude

    Hawai'ian cockroach stowaway

    That's great, fingers crossed you get a pair or two, I mean you've got 7 now, you'd have to be quite unlucky to end up with a unisex group! 😂 Well not really a new species, rather an old one that people in the US kinda stopped breeding, still an amazing find though for sure, (and a great story as well! 😄). Adults are 45-50 mm in length, so kinda sizeable. And you can always put them in a clear ziploc baggie and turn them upside-down to sex them.
  4. Hisserdude

    Hormetica apolinari

    Who knows, there's been three editions of "For the Love of Rhinoceros and Stag Beetles! 😄
  5. Hisserdude

    Hormetica apolinari

    Exactly! And alas, they weren't even in the hobby when FTLOC came out LOL!
  6. Hisserdude

    Hormetica apolinari

    Yeah, they are very slow breeding, and I think they take around a year to mature... Definitely one of the prettiest roaches to enter the US hobby in the past few years, really hope they become more widespread in the hobby soon...
  7. Hisserdude

    Hormetica apolinari

    I believe almost everyone who got them from Gil has bred them successfully, but seeing as they are such slow breeders and growers, it'll be a while until they are readily available here.
  8. Yeah, it's a beautiful species, I only know of one breeder in Asia who's ever had them though... So it might be a while until we see them in the US.
  9. Yes, the species Orin talks about in his book is vittata. True H.histrio look very different from H.vittata, here's an image of a true H.histrio adult: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/21047336 Basically the most sought after roaches are new additions to the hobby, ones that are very difficult to breed long term, and ones that take forever to grow and have limited litter sizes. Also the prettier or more unique the roach, the more sought after it is. Thing is, people are more likely to forget about taking care of species that seem to be doing well for them, and Ectobiids tend to do well for people when they are being treated like royalty... Once a colony is established, that's when people get more lax and slip up, and while most roaches can take a few slip ups, most Ectobiids can not...
  10. The thing with Ectobiids is that while many are technically easy to breed in terms of dietary and setup requirements, and prolific at that, they are also very fragile, any mess ups or lapses in care, like if you forget to mist or feed them one time, and your culture will most likely completely crash. They are also sensitive to overcrowding, so if your colony gets too big and crowded, crash. Too many mites or springtails? Crash. Most smaller Ectobiids require consistent care, and a lot of people don't seem to be able to provide that for some reason, just forgetful I suppose, so a lot of people's cultures end up crashing.
  11. Hemithyrsocera histrio is almost nonexistent in the hobby, Hemithyrsocera vittata however, which was widely misidentified in the hobby AS H.histrio, is being kept by several European and Asian breeders with great success, still don't have them here in the US though, at least not in good numbers...
  12. Hisserdude

    Bantua sp. "Namibia"

    Yeah, they are a relatively new arrival to the hobby, and an obscure one at that. Yes, much like BDFBs and some other Tenebrionids, I believe the waxy coating aids in preventing dehydration, since they come from a very arid habitat.
  13. Hisserdude

    Bantua sp. "Namibia"

    Finally got some of these beauties, one of the first to keep them in the US, fingers crossed they'll breed for me! Here are some pictures of a couple nymphs!
  14. Hisserdude

    Bantua sp. "Namibia"

    One of my males matured!
  15. Hisserdude

    Gyna capucina (Pink Roach)

    More pictures of my male:
  16. Got some of these beauties last week along with the Bantua, here are some pictures of a nymph: And an adult male! Fingers crossed I can breed them successfully!
  17. Hisserdude

    Panchlora sp. "White"!

    Very nice, and this came from a Panchlora nivea colony, are you sure? Because there's a very similar, unidentified species in the hobby that goes by the name of Panchlora sp. "Costa Rica", and that stock is well know for producing yellow individuals on occasion. If this came from a true Panchlora nivea colony, not a mislabeled sp. "Costa Rica" colony, then this would be a first for the hobby.
  18. Hisserdude

    Panchlora sp. "White"!

    Got a female and two males from Gil Wizen, and boy are they beautiful! Unfortunately I was too excited to take any good pictures, my hands were shaking too much lol! Here are some shoddy pictures of them, I'll try to get better ones soon! Female (She's a bit more ivory colored than the males) Male
  19. Hisserdude

    Hi from Germany

    Hello, welcome the forum, hope you enjoy it here! Loboptera are very cute little things, that's for sure!
  20. Hisserdude

    Hawai'ian cockroach stowaway

    Yeah, they probably can be found under loose bark on dead trees and such, as well as objects lying on the ground. Not a lot of research has been done into their preffered wild microhabitats TBH... Interesting, well I'm glad they like the dry stuff then! Weird, I've seen a couple of non-burrowing Blaberid nymphs do that before, they'll hide under loose substrate if frightened... Probably, I mean they can climb glass as adults, so you might just find it climbing the walls of the enclosure one day! 😂 If the enclosure isn't too big you should be able to find it pretty easy I think, as they aren't burrowers, so it'll be on a hide somewhere... Pretty sure it'll be a similar ratio to other Blaberids, however you could still get unlucky and have a unisex group, you never know!
  21. Hisserdude

    Hawai'ian cockroach stowaway

    Sounds good, should work well to heat them! Kyle from Roachcrossing hasn't been active in quite a while, and is very inconsistent in terms of customer service nowadays, several people claimed they paid him and never received anything in return, had to file PayPal claims to get their money back... Overall I doubt we'll be seeing a true return anytime soon, which is a shame, he used to be one of the best vendors in the US. 😕 Of course, but if you can breed them successfully, you'll definitely have some customers is all I'm saying! Yeah according to my friend, Rhyparobia like vertically slanted bark slabs stacked against each other quite a bit for hides, which kinda explains why yours are hiding there!
  22. Hisserdude

    Hawai'ian cockroach stowaway

    ZooMed heat cables work great, at least that's the brand I use. Definitely make sure that their lid in on tight, because I've found Vaseline doesn't keep in 100% of climbing roaches, eventually they wear down the barrier and small nymphs can sometimes get past it. FYI, I think my buddy @Bmaines96 would love some when you've got an established colony, he has a single pair he got from Roachcrossing, but the female aborted her first ooth, hasn't reproduced since then... His R.sp. "Gold" are breeding well, but sadly there's no one else he can get more maderae from anymore.
  23. Hisserdude

    Hawai'ian cockroach stowaway

    LOL yeah Rhyparobia are some of the least handleable roaches in the hobby, I don't know about nymphs, but adults do have a bad smelling defensive secretion, they'll squeak at you when you attempt to hold them, and will even resort to ejecting poop if need be... So yeah, not really a hands on species, but nice to look at, and adults exhibit some paternal care towards their nymphs.
  24. Hisserdude

    Hawai'ian cockroach stowaway

    I use a heat cable for my heating purposes, works well and never gets too hot, just run it under a quarter or half of the enclosure, and you should be set... Of course, getting a whole heat cable MIGHT be overkill for one little tank, but it'll come in handy the more roaches you get, (few species in the hobby will breed at 60F°).
  25. Hisserdude

    5 new roach species in the US hobby!

    Yeah, where's my free culture of Pseudoglomeris beybienkoi? 😜 (Formerly known as Corydidarum sp. "Yunnan"). I hear they don't hold up that well when shipped in very humid conditions BTW... Definitely more finicky than P.magnifica.
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