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Hisserdude

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Everything posted by Hisserdude

  1. Hisserdude

    Herniated incubation bag

    That's good, hopefully you get some offspring from them soon!
  2. Hisserdude

    Mold on cork bark?

    Yeah, most people just find them in their enclosures one day lol! I'd definitely add them to your roach enclosures, as they don't stress them out at all, and help keep things a bit cleaner.
  3. Hisserdude

    Herniated incubation bag

    Well good luck, hopefully she recovers, do you have other females?
  4. Hisserdude

    Which species?

    Yeah, definitely doesn't hurt to add leaves, as they may need at least a small amount in their diets, but all of my Corydiids' favorite foods have been dog food/chick feed.
  5. Hisserdude

    Which species?

    Actually it appears that a protein based food like dog food is even more important to their diet than decaying leaves, and they certainly grow faster with it in their diet... Heck according to @Cariblatta lutea dead leaves may not even be neccesary in their diet! So I definitely wouldn't say you can chuck them in with some dead leaves and expect them to survive or grow well with little to no supplemental foods...
  6. Hisserdude

    Herniated incubation bag

    Looks like she's had a prolapse, one this bad is normally fatal, even if not she certainly won't reproduce again... Anything you could do would probably make it worse, honestly it might just be best to euthanize her...
  7. Hisserdude

    Anisolampra panfilovi

    Odd, but yeah just keep them very humid and warm, with lots of bark and leaf litter, feed them lots of fruits, and they will probably breed pretty well... Don't try to keep them in a "semi-aquatic" enclosure!
  8. Hisserdude

    Mold on cork bark?

    Not sure exactly where one would buy them, Kyle at Roachcrossing used to sell them... Most people end up getting small silver springtails in their enclosures at some point, (they usually come in with unsterlized media, or as hitchhikers in the mail with new inverts), they are pretty dang tiny, and thus don't bother roaches, but do help a bit with keeping mold growth down.
  9. Hisserdude

    Salutations from the 51st US State: Confusion

    Ah OK, yeah they don't really care about most average Blatticulturists keeping exotic roaches, especially since the majority of them don't pose much of a threat to agriculture or of becoming household pests, but since you're applying for permits on Phasmids and exotic scarabs, they're gonna be monitoring ALL your pet inverts pretty strictly... Still feel like they probably wouldn't bust your chops over most of the species that have been firmly established in the US hobby for years even without permits, like all the Blaberus species, Gromphadorhina, Eublaberus, Therea, Gyna, etc., but some of the newer stuff like Pseudoglomeris magnifica, Archiblatta hoeveni, Hemithyrsocera spp., etc. MIGHT draw some reprimands...
  10. Hisserdude

    What do you use for substrate?

    Yeah those could make a good addition to the substrate, the leaves especially, the wood may not be too helpful unless it's been rotted a bit.
  11. Hisserdude

    Mold on cork bark?

    Depends on the springtail species, if you could just get some small silver ones, that'd be great, those never bother ANY roaches...
  12. Hisserdude

    Mold on cork bark?

    Yeah this normally happens to sterilized media, give a few days to a week, it should disappear, especially if any springtails are already present in the enclosure.
  13. Hisserdude

    What do you use for substrate?

    I mainly use coconut fiber, but I'll mix in dead leaves, rotten wood, and some Zilla "Jungle Mix" from time to time for certain species.
  14. Hisserdude

    Help picking species to keep

    Pseudoglomeris magnifica (formerly Corydidarum) fit your criteria pretty well, as I don't think the males are especially flighty. They are diurnal, beautiful, relatively easy to care for, however they do require temps above 75F° to breed normally. The three Therea species also fit your needs pretty well, and are much more easily obtainable.
  15. Hisserdude

    Which species?

    Therea olegrandjeani is a nice beginner species, very cute and a nice step up in difficulty from hissers, (but not difficult by any means). Polyphaga saussurei is another favorite of mine, pretty simple to care for and cute, albeit a bit pricey.
  16. Yeah but the problem lies with most roaches and isopods inhibiting similar niches, so one usually outcompetes the other, and USUALLY the species of isopods selected as cleaner crews have the advantage with a faster breeding speed... Also the whole cuttlefish bone thing is overrated, several old time hobbyists have consistently reared several isopod species for years without any calcium additives, with next to no cannibalism...
  17. Hisserdude

    Anisolampra panfilovi

    I'd keep them very humid with a moderate amount of ventilation, with lots of bark hides and leaf litter. Keep them at around 74-80F°, feed them lots of fruits in addition to something like dog kibble, and they will likely breed OK. The thing with most semi-aquatic Epilamprids is that they don't HAVE to be given a semi-aquatic setup, just keep the substrate pretty humid and it'll be fine. If you do give them water, it MUST be flowing water, still, standing water gets stagnant and dirty very easily and makes most Epilamprids sick!
  18. Yeah most burrowers are unaffected by tropical pink springtails, it's the non-burrowers that can get stressed by the constant tactile contact. Smaller springtail species like the little silver ones are compatible with every roach species I know of.
  19. Yeah, those will climb around on branches and stuff should you provide them with some. Pseudoglomeris magnifica are very expensive right now, and I only know of one vendor in the US who sells them, (@Bmaines96), but they are absolutely beautiful! And there are a few other Gyna species in captivity but they are very finicky, as well as a few other Panchlora species.
  20. Springtails seem to be the best CUC for most roach species, however some of the larger varieties like the tropical pinks, (Sinella curviseta) have been known to stress out and overwhelm a lot of the more sensitive roach species.
  21. Gyna adults could be considered aboreal, as could Panchlora adults... Pseudoglomeris magnifica are rather easy to breed and aboreal, but very expensive and can be slow growing.
  22. Hisserdude

    Salutations from the 51st US State: Confusion

    Where exactly do you live? Technically most roaches in the continental US shouldn't be legal to keep, but since they are kept by so many people, with many species having been bred for years and years, the USDA doesn't bother enforcing said laws anywhere except FL. You generally won't encounter trouble with keeping roaches in the US unless you go looking for it, and I don't know of anyone who's had the USDA knock on their door to confiscate their roaches, (whereas phasmids, exotic Orthopterans and exotic beetles are MUCH more strictly regulated).
  23. Yeah, none of the Pseudoglomeris (formerly Corydidarum) can curl up into balls, Perisphaerus is now the only roach genus that can.
  24. Actually looking back, we weren't quite able to reach a verdict on Gil's thread as to the preffered name for Lanxoblatta rudis, but later when I created a photo thread for the species the conversation was reignited, which is when we reached the conclusion to call them the "rough bark roach".
  25. Well we all generally agreed on Gil's thread on this species that rough bark roach should be the name, as "rudis" translates to rough or coarse in Latin. Well they don't curl up at all, so I'd save the "Pillbug" moniker for Perisphaerus species, not Pseudoglomeris. Emerald or Magnificent Emerald roach would work better. Thorax is being bred by several people in Europe, and at least one of my US buddies has them, (but he'll likely need a new group later this year). They are kinda finicky like Rhabdoblatta formosana, but they are about as established in the hobby as they are, if not more so... Perhaps that should be the name for improcera then, it hardly does the appearance justice, and there are several little Eurycotis, but if that's literally what improcera means, that's what we should go with! Well the only person I've seen give grossei a common name was Kyle, and he used Mega glowspot. Not as cheesy as his other common names, so I'd just use that since more people are familiar with that name ATM... Yup, the little Kenyans have been tentatively I'd as P.minutissima, that's apparently the Paraplecta species they match the best according to Dominic Evangelista.
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