Jump to content

wizentrop

Members
  • Content count

    131
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    19

Posts posted by wizentrop


  1. @Hisserdude I am sure I don't have to tell you this, but don't even consider using bark from those conifers. All roaches will consume some fibers off bark, Lanxoblatta no exception. Conifer bark may contain some toxic compounds.
    Anyway, with cardboard the main problem is that you have to change it every couple of weeks. It is possible if you are attentive to your collection, but it will cause some stress for your roaches.


  2. @Redmont I tried with several conehead katydids (among those were the spiny devils), they are very prone to bad molting (not to mention the cannibalism, even among adults). And then, they are very reluctant to lay eggs. So not worth the investment until I figure out a better way to keep them, maybe one day in the far future. Other groups of katydids are easier.


  3. @Hisserdude A container 10inch tall should be enough. And definitely yes to barks leaning one against another, they like to hide. No special space is needed for molting, they are already extremely flat. No signs of cannibalism. They don't go for dog food.

    @Redmont I am not a collector, if that's your question. I do research there from time to time. Whatever I post here are remnants from surveys I did in the past.

    • Like 1

  4. The photos are a visual aid only, don't take them as a literal expression of how the enclosure should look like.

    A base substrate is needed to retain humidity, it can be peat or coco fiber or soil. It does not matter because the roaches will not be using it.
    As for the bark, it needs to be vertical, and not too rough because the nymphs like to lay tight on the bark. A rough surface makes them stressed and restless. Both flat and curved barks work. I will even go one step further and say that a flat wood board (like MDF) should work too. I have not tried it, but from what I learned about this species, they will probably accept it.
    I mentioned they feed on moss and fungi but it would be difficult to replicate this diet in captivity. They do well on a fruit diet, I did not notice any issues. In fact, the F1 roaches are way bigger than the wild ones I originally collected, I see this as a good sign that there is no nutritional deficiency.


  5. It's time to welcome another new species into the hobby - Lanxoblatta rudis!
    This beautiful bark roach is native to South America. They are flat, and I do mean *flat*, because they spend most of their time on tree bark, feeding on moss and fungi.
    Adults are dark maroon in color and bullet-shaped (photo is of a female, males look the same just flatter). But the nymphs... oh, the nymphs! They bring me much joy. They have body extensions that give them a disk shape. This is an adaptation against ants - nymphs will hunker down and merge with the bark when provoked. I will post more photos below.

    This species requires some experience in husbandry, but once you get them going they are very rewarding to watch. They are active despite their cryptic appearance. I would rate their breeding difficulty as intermediate. They require a smooth bark substrate (cork is not a very good alternative, it is too rough), high humidity, and minimal ventilation. Not very picky eaters. Not good fliers, but excellent climbers. Females give birth to 20 nymphs or so.
     

    Lanxoblatta-rudis-low.jpg

    • Like 6
×