Jump to content

Pharma

Members
  • Content count

    151
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Pharma

  1. Pharma

    Blaptica dubia nymph

    Ähhh... Why do you support a horrible pet shop ? Malnutrition really could be an explanation. Question: The white parts, are they hard or soft like newly molted? OK, fungi would tendentially increase the white areas but there are very slowly growing species too. But that it's mere speculation. I keep my fingers crossed for you that it's an inherited mutation !
  2. Pharma

    Phorid Fly: A vector for small nematodes?

    SIR, YES, SIR I know... humidity is low and substrate is new (and there are still roaches dying and flies present until there is no overpopulation anymore, stupid me ). I really appreciate your swift & solid help but it's not about saving lifes this time (well, it is, but not in this post). It is about the question whether the flies itself or some nematodes kill my roaches and if there is a possibility to get rid of the nematodes without affecting insects, e.g. roaches (and unfortunately the flies too).
  3. Pharma

    Phorid Fly: A vector for small nematodes?

    Hi Zephyr Well... I know that and handle it already like this but the phorid flies are nevertheless a problem at the moment . Thanks anyway! I just wondered why it's always the newly molted adults who die and this nematode-story could explain why. I know Matts post but I thought I could fight the nematodes (!) in addition to the phorid flies and wonder how I could do that. Grüessli Andreas
  4. Pharma

    What do you do when you feel crummy?

    Hi This S.A.D. or similar illnesses are well known in very northern countries with very short days (or even only twilight) in winter. One treatment is something like a 'light chamber', a very bright illuminated room in which you sit an hour or two every day (in some regions it is/was obligatory!). Light leads to the production of serotonin which (besides many other effects) is essential for circadian rhythm and which lifts your mood (that's the way how prozac works ). Short-wavelength light (near UVA and blue) seem to be more efficient -> Illumination for reptiles/fish would do fine, like an Osram Vitalux 300W (made for humans as face tanning but often used for herps) or the canadian herpetology product Mega Ray 160W (both self-ballasted HQL blended light bulbs). Daylight HO T5 tubes (up to 80 W, best in Europe: BioVital by Narva ) or NDL HCI (up to 250W) would do the job too. Just 'sunbath' an extra hour in the morning and the evening to tell your brain that it's day and not night! I heard from a man having severe depressions till he used about 500W metallhalid lamps as a 'buzzer' every morning and *ZACK* within days he was fit again. Grüessli Andreas
  5. Pharma

    My Blaberus craniifer assortment

    Hi Others I have look 'better' and some nearly completely black but I guess I have chosen the absolutly worst one . I'll do new photos! P.S. This odd Therea was once named T. petiveriana on the page and is (if I am informed right) the one commonly traded/kept in Germany/Switzerland under the name T. petiveriana or 'domino roach'!!
  6. Pharma

    Blaptica dubia nymph

    Hi If you're lucky you have piebalds, a recessive mutation causing partial lack of pigmentation . No, seriously, I have no idea what it is, might really be a mutation but it could be an infection too (e.g. fungi) or just a mis-development... You could try to breed this two (if it's a pair) and maybe get a new morph? Would be very cool (but I guess that it's not inherited)! Grüessli Andreas
  7. Pharma

    My Blaberus craniifer assortment

    Hi all @Matt OK, good to know (the BCG stuff). Separation isn't that difficult when keeping only one roach species and bying no others as it should be the case for my German B. craniifer, Archimandrita, and Gromphadorhina (don't destroy my hopes now, pleeeeaaase!). About the off-topic stuff: I think I'll make a separate tread sooner or later. @Orin Thanks for the graphic! Now I understand! I can't remember whether my 'black wings' have a sharp color transition at the indicated places or not... I'll check on that! Are the Florida Key's B. craniifer the same like the 'black wings'? You're right about B. giganteus... I excluded them without mentioning because they are easy to distinguish and can't interbreed with B. craniifer (due to size and genitalia differences and according to some interbreeding trials in Germany) and my brain just automatically erased them from my reasoning. Ingo thinks (if I remember correctly) that G. portentosa and 'P. vanwaerebeki' interbreed because they are the same! The problem with them is, that they have no real morphological difference like male genitalia (except maybe coloration and size but this is highly variable and can be changed by selective breeding). Therefore there is no proof for them being two genera and no valide one for a common one as well -> only genotyping (or mDNA) would clear the mist! The Therea stuff I missed. I thought they're name is Therea for more than a year at least ! I only remember T. olegrandjeani's (re-)naming. Grüessli Andreas
  8. Pharma

    Temperature Induced Sex Determination

    Hi BugmanPrice is absolutely right! In reptiles sex is either determined by chromosoms OR temperature (and maybe other environment factors). All reptilian species so far examined have either contain sex chromosoms (or microchromosoms in case of for example Pogona vitticeps) and aren't influenced by temperature or they have no sex chromosoms and sex develops during incubation of the eggs. (See Wikipedia for overwiev: CLICK) There were done some experiments with P. vitticeps (publications online available ) showing that very high temperatures "produce" mainly male offspring (and kills a good percentage of the eggs) which are male or female by chromosoms! The good/bad thing explaining why this works is, that the genetically female males ('pseudo-males') are sterile! It seems that this lizzard once had a temperature dependent sex determination which under extreme conditions still works and dominates the sex chromosoms. Very low temperatures seem to result in more female than male offspring because males are more sensitive and just die earlyer (and at such low temperatures the death rate is very high). If I have it correctly in mind: In one publication they raised the question about what could be in between because there seem to be reptiles which have lost chromosome determined sex determination and others which gained it late in evolution (due to examinations on closely related species). It would be amazing if the transition were sharp (switch off environment/temperature sensing pathways and 'create' a sex chromosome or vice versa). Evolution usually goes gradually if there is no 'jump' caused by a single mutation (or you read the 'evolution v.s. creation poll' ). Grüessli Andreas
  9. Pharma

    Roach Condos

    Hi Non of my roaches ever ate hot glue but my Pachnoda marginata peregrina larvae did and according to the fast reproduction it hasn't done any harm yet. Our hot glue (in Switzerland) consists mainly (because it isn't hard and brittle it obviously isn't pure and has to contain other things like plasticizer) of polypropylene, an inert and non-digestible plastic. But plasticizers aren't that great... the most frequently used ones in PVC are phthalic acid derivatives infamous for their hormone-like potential (estrogenic). Grüessli Andreas
  10. Pharma

    My Blaberus craniifer assortment

    Now I'm quite confused and thats not because it's long after midnight here... @Orin You mean that there are other Blaberus sp. with hairs on their wings? I've been told by User Lucihormetica (the "roachgood" in Germany ) that this is not the case and due to the assumption that B. craniifer can't breed with other species I'm really quite sure that they are B. craniifer. OK, I should finally do the section of the male genitalia or at least try it (but if even Roth seems not that sure???). Certainly I know nothing about the strain or their origin and therefore I wrote referred to be a 'pure' strain and common Swiss strain! I'd love to keep a really pure strain of known origin but that is as good as impossible here around! And that's the reason why I have no concerns to selectively breed my roaches. Sorry, but I unfortunately don't really understand your last two sentenses... What ist 'FL B. craniifer' und with which species (or do you mean strains) should/could they be crossed? And what is that thing with B. fusca and B. trapezoideus? The BCG if I understood that right tells a different story: B. fusca is the synonym for B. atropos which shouldn't have hairs on the wings whilst B. trapezoideus is the synonym of B. craniifer... Do you mean that we keep a lineage of lets say undefined taxonomy and in the worst case a hybride of another group (whose species might interbreed) or that we keep the syn. B. trapezoideus being a maybe pure strain of B. craniifer? About the 'Black Wings': Well, OK than... so we Europeans all keep a hybride... that truly is a pitty! @Matt To begin with: It is important to distinguish between species and strain. Usually people talk about the species because even that can be tricky let alone strain or origin. We over here are happy with the 'fact' (= assumption) that we get a Blaberus sp. of which we know (or believe to know) it has been kept in culture for at least 1-2 decades without the possibility to breed with another strain/species and that is what's called 'true' or 'pure' (usually meaning the species not the strain). After all we know that we don't know which strain it is or from where it originates... There still is the fear that they (B. craniifer) could/might breed with other species (NOT strains) and no one wants to have such hybrids, avoiding strain-hybrides (a word rarely known) would be a too big demand . I got a G. portentosa strain which came to me via two persons after it was imported from Madagascar by the zoo in Zurich and it is quite likely that at least this strain is 'pure' but the coloration... uhh.... And I have a A. marmorata (of better A. cf. marmorata or A. mark. marmorata) strain also from third hand being imported from Cuba by a biology teacher but they look like A. tesselata... at least I can track both species back and that is a very rare and lucky position compared to most roach keepers! As you say: Find/catch it yourself and you can be sure to know from where they are. With a bit of luck one can i.d. the species too... but I think that there is less than a dozen people on earth more or less capable to i.d. a B. craniifer strain. And finally: The guy from Schaben-Spinnen.de is a BCG member and therefore should have (I expect that from him and the BCG) only pure species (and theoretically pure strains). I guess I have to contact him and bombard him with questions... Puzzled regards Andreas
  11. Pharma

    My Blaberus craniifer assortment

    Hi Orin - They often have the skull pattern, but usually only a few faint dots (the skull of the BW isn't fully visible because of a light reflection). This pattern seems quite common here around. They have this hairs on their wings which 'marks' them as B. craniifer (or spec.-hybrids if that exists) so I'm quite sure that they really are what they are supposed to be. - The 'Black Wings' are from www.schaben-spinnen.de who is quite reliable but it might be that he got a strain-hybride (who knows?). Why do you think that it isn't a pure strain (How can they be distinguished on a picture -> I can't see anything except the depth in brown compared to those in THESE THREADS)? Could it also be a selectively bred one only available in Europe (Well, it shouldn't be named BW than...)? I know that usually European B. craniifer look quite different than those you keep in the USA and that's the reason why I posted all those pictures! Besides: You for sure know this publication by Roth CLICK and there many of 'his' B. craniifer don't show the skull neither and they for sure are true B. craniifer. Grüessli Andreas
  12. Well, it's more than a week since the tread started but still: Two females, one male and nymphs of my B. craniifer I try to selectively breed for an extra-dark brown. It's not the darkest ones I have but the only I could photographe that day (a slightly darker female is picture A in the GALLERY).
  13. Pharma

    Happy Thanksgiving.......

    Hi everybody Happy thanksgiving to you too*! *Sorry for that really stupid sounding question but I always tought that TG is in December before X-mas (OK, the direct engl.-germ. translation suggest the assumption, that it's related to harvest and is therefore at the end of fall): What IS thanksgiving exactely?! We here in Switzerland hear/see a lot of turkey-eating in US-movies (and the children start celebrating Halloween too) but nearly no one (like me) knows what it really is about (well, the youth don't even know OUR OWN traditional feasts except X-mas, Easter and national day). 'Erntedankfest' (29. September, might be the thanksgiving counterpart) and other old Germanic Holy Days aren't celebrated quite often... boring Old World. Grüessli Andreas
  14. Pharma

    DISCOVERY:

    Hi BP I don't know if they are kept (or allowed to keep) in the USA but here in Europe they have a small but increasing fan community (and I heared that they can even be ordered online). If they would go for less problematic ('pest') roaches, I'd already have them I guess... There are some awesome movies on the net: CLICK or CLICK. Grüessli Andreas
  15. Hi Somehow this tread sounds familiar to me ! I do not twitter and therefore I'm not gonna write in there but I put in my cents here: Last example: Not only the breath but even the 'wind' YOU produce when trying to step on a roach is enough to trigger the 'run away reflex' . And that is also the case for bird wings and many other 'winds' (subtlest air drafts) predators produce. Do you accidentally understand German? Cause there is a really smashing docu movie available online (even only LOOKING at it can be interesting)! Link-collection is on the HP of a friend from whom I got many of my roaches: CLICK Grüessli Andreas
  16. Pharma

    DISCOVERY:

    @BP Ah, OK! Now I understand. I'm in two minds about ordering this mites because they are quite nonselective and could (or would?) kill all my great saprophytes too (or even prior to the phorids )... Periplaneta sp. aren't ovoviviparous but being it wouldn't help them much -> I only say Ampulex compressa (WIKIPEDIA) Ovoviviparity has many other advantages too, besides the disadvantages of being 'pregnang' (e.g. controlled climate, avoiding any kind of predator incl. fungi, bacteria, and less 'collateral damage' by huge animals, drowning when it rains etc...)!
  17. Pharma

    Does anyone know...

    @BugmanPrice I know it's off topic but anyway... Most neophytes aren't escapees from privat persons or direct trade but are the result of globalization (e.g. 'pest' cockroaches, rats etc.) or of livestock breeding and agronomy which imported and colonized them on purpose (e.g. Australia and rabbits and Bufo marinus or Mauritius and Réunion and Herpestes edwardsii). Actually globalization is quite likely the most importent and nearly only cause at the moment because it can't be reduced nor controlled tightly and the possibility that there is a stowaway on one of all those hundred thousend pallets and containers transpoted from continent to continent each day is very likely. Even tourism seems to me to be more important than direct trade of possibly problematic animals/plants (e.g. Aedes albopictus a vector for several tropical diseases crossing the Swiss alps). P.S. Even in Switzerland with our direct democracy we have politicians (and citizens of course) with a doubtful right to be on the loose (hope I translated that idiom right ) but eyes and ears are eighter a bit blind and deaf or just some more tolerant...
  18. Pharma

    DISCOVERY:

    Hi Matt Uhhh.... You mention Hypoaspis miles a predatory mite hunting several small soil-dwelling invertebrates like Sciaridae, Ephydridae, Thysanoptera sp., and even mites, springtails, or small nemathodes and then you talk about wasps!? But good to know that it (whatever it is/was) worked! Last week I've found two dead Archimandrita and when I lifted them out, their abdomens fell apart and released a heaped tablespoon full of phorid fly larvae each. I nearly puked into the roach box... I thought about buying some predatory wasp but they cost about a hundred $ a package or aren't available at the moment! It's good to know that Hypoaspis miles (if it were that) works fine too cause they cost only about 20 $. Grüessli Andreas
  19. Pharma

    Does anyone know...

    Illegal? Really? In what kind of country do you live?! Maybe you should move over here, I know where to get at least H. dilatata in Switzerland an in Germany and most roaches cost only 10-20% of the US prices .
  20. Pharma

    Porcelain Cockroach (Gyna lurida)

    It's not harmful but it might be not that tasty for some animals, just check it out ! There is no cockroach to my knowledge which is 'toxic' (male hissers could injure the mouth of a predator with sharp pronotum splinters but that's all). My bearded dragons eat nearly any sort of animal, no matter how ugly the devensive secretion smells to me whereas my dogs prefere the non-smelling roaches/insects/spiders/rodents (yesss... on of my yorkies would kill for hissing cockroaches and mice, likes crunchy bugs and Tegenaria atrica -> a real dog knows what 'fresh food' means ).
  21. Pharma

    Porcelain Cockroach (Gyna lurida)

    Week or excessive ones I feed to my bearded lizzards and they love them!
  22. Pharma

    Cannibalism

    @ralph Well... Cat food and fish flakes should contain at least some animal proteins (>4% ). Seriously: really good cat food contains at least 80% meat. @BugmanPrice When I started my B. dubia culture I 'forgot' the protein source (because I didn't know better) and one night after several month on a pure 'vegan like diet' they eat all males and then started to kill the weaker and freshly molted ones. Fortunately I got help soon and gave them proteins (dog food) which soon stopped the cannibalism. Well, this mistake cost me about half the culture and lacking males led to halt in reproduction for 1-2 months... @Robo roach Isn't 90% humidity a bit too high? Some insects can't harden their exoskeleton completely when kept too moist and therefore could be easier pray or just die (and get eaten afterwards)... Honestly I have no idea whether your roaches (which are what sp.?) tolerate this humidity AND if you're not running into mould, rot, and mites troubles sooner or later. Grüessli Andreas
  23. Pharma

    Domino roach enclosure

    Hi Well, the moss isn't sphagnum for sure.. but who cares? My box for T. olegrandjeani looks very similar! I use a mixture of old leafs (from different trees) together with old white rotten wood junks(I don't know the english word for that... there are some fungi digesting mainly lignin leaving the white, soft, and spongy cellulose matrix) and soil from a deciduous forest at about equal parts. There is some moss in there too but it does neither grow nor stores more water than the wood/soil does and I think it's favorable to have a substrate which can get dry within few days just in case that it starts to mould or if I watered it too intense. I keep most of the substrate moist and 'fluffy' but never wet or compact and I have quite a few white woodlice (always forget their name) and springtails in there and the roach colony is flurishing. Nota bene: Small pieces of food like fruits, cereals, 'chicken rearing fodder', vegies, and pollen is served in a small saucer. The ootheca need a lot of time to hatch but in my oppinion this is the only difficulty.
  24. Pharma

    B. lateralis Questions

    Or you could put some water in the outer tank (works like alcatraz, especially when adding some fish ). But either way this "second barrier strategy" is a good thing to start with! As we say: "Vorsicht ist die Mutter der Porzellankiste" (engl. Precaution is the mother of the porcelain chest) meaning something like 'Better safe than sorry'.
  25. Pharma

    B. lateralis Questions

    Hi Roachman 1. Can they or can they not climb glass aquariums with silicon in the corners? - Well, all stages (nymphs and adults) can't walk on smooth surfaces (e.g. glass) but they use small irreguliarities (e.g. corners, dirt on the surface etc.) to hold onto and therefore especially small ones somethimes climb out of an aquarium. 2. Can they climb out of or escape in any other way from ordinary 18 gal. plastic tubs with some very fine, metal screen hot-glued over some vent. holes and a secure lid? - See point 1! A tight fitting fine screen should work great BUT adult males can fly (ok, escapees won't reproduce )! 3. Will a 2" vaseline barrier in said plastic tub help contain them? - Should work, but I don't have any personal experiences... nymphs of some small species can walk on vaseline but I have no idea if that is the case for S. lateralis. 4. This will be my first egg-laying sp. Do they or don't they need substrate, assuming humidity is high enough (50-80%)? - They don't (which is one of the 'problems' with them, see point 6.). 5. Do they or don't they stink? - My nose sais: "Yes, they do!" But they are by far not as stinky as my Rhyparobia maderae. S. lateralis has a strange sweetish odor which doesn't disturb everyone and which isn't really nasty in my oppinion. 6. I understand they are relatively small and very speedy. Anything else I should be warned about BEFORE I get them? - YES, there is! Unlike most other captive kept cockroaches Shelfordella lateralis originates not from subtropical/tropical regions. That means they reproduce also at lower temperatures (I heard of 10-15°C or 50-59°F) and can easily survive cold winters which means together with point 4 that they might become a pest in your appartment. In fact this is the only roach species except the immigrated Blatta orientalis and Blattella germanica which I ever heard of (from trustful sources*) breeding/reproducing uncontrolled in appartments/houses here in Switzerland and Germany! *Besides many rumors I know a handful of people who had severe problems and heard of more than a dozend friends of friends who had a 'roach-plaque' at home... Trubles with Blatta orientalis and Blattella germanica usually are correlated with a messy household (often that of the neightbors ) or damaged/old wastewater systems. Therefore I would never keep S. lateralis or species of the genera Blatta, Blattella, or Periplaneta even though many people do. I do have Nauphoeta cinerea and Rhyparobia maderae both being said to be pest insects but I never heard of people in middle Europe having problems with these two species. I can imagine that in warmer regions like southern USA many cockroach species could reproduce in a flat more easily but usually they don't (maybe because they need different food and/or more water which isn't present in an orderly household or they go outdoors where it's warmer than in an air-conditioned room?). Have fun with them !
×