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Matttoadman

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Matttoadman last won the day on February 1

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About Matttoadman

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    Hissing Cockroach

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    KY
  • Interests
    Cockroaches, tarantulas, frogs and toads, guitar, Greek bouzouki, tenor banjo, and button accordion.

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  1. Matttoadman

    Observations from an Entomologist.

    Basically once a roach shows a resistance to a chemical, increasing the potency merely speeds up the resistance over time. The resistance begins because they get sublethal doses. It’s sort of like what we are seeing with antibiotics. Most chemicals on the market, especially over the counter are derived from a species of chrysanthemum. They contain a natural insecticide the plant uses for protection. The labs have just created their own version of them. Roaches are just about immune to it though. They have tried looking at other plant created insecticides. For example nicotine in tobacco. They however have been banned almost. They seemed to potent on bees.
  2. Matttoadman

    Observations from an Entomologist.

    Well I don’t think it’s about creating something more toxic. They usually look for another family of chemicals or a new mode of action. The problem is the companies selling over the counter. The problem is untrained individuals use chemical incorrectly and lead to the resistance. It’s all about following the label and knowing where and what to do with it. In my own observations I have found that the tiniest amount of pesticide placed in a perfect spot can crash the population. Most people have a more is better approach and make it worse. I have a saying. You can take a machine gun squirrel hunting but you still end up with a dead squirrel.
  3. I had the opportunity to listen to a talk from the New Entomologist at the University of Ky. This will give you an idea of just how tough German cockroaches are. They went into several low income apartments and collected roaches. They separated out the males. Back in the apartments Kitchen floor they placed two dishes, one with wild collected males and another with males of a lab strain. Between the dishes they set off insecticide “foggers” or “bug bombs”. As expected the lab strain all died. Very few of the wild collected died. This blows my mind. They also found that the kitchen counter tops and floors after a month had the same level of insecticide as Pre fogging. So these roaches appear to be living in an atmosphere completely contaminated with insecticide long after spraying. The study was actually to see how effective total release foggers actually were....useless as all us exterminators already knew
  4. Some of my observations from the “wild”. German cockroach infestations seem to appear in most instances from a few specimens or a single egg case. It’s actually quite insane to see what that can turn into.
  5. Matttoadman

    Help!

    How large were they? I have found that no species of roach lives too long after they reach their final molt. Anywhere 3 months to maybe a year for some species. And males lifespans are shorter than females.
  6. Matttoadman

    green banana roaches

    On an opposite note, I remember when I use to provide pest control for a penitentiary. The basement of the facility was where al the access to the plumbing and electrical areas were. It was a constant 90 degrees and the humidity was equally as high. There were massive colonies of American roaches living there. The building was supported by concrete pillars and they would hang on these like herds of sheep. Moving as a group (not scattering)if you shown a flash light on them. The interesting thing is this area was lit 24/7. The did not hang out in the dim areas. We sprayed once a week and there were never in dead to be found. I almost think they lived solely off the dead we created. So it appears once roaches get used to a particular light cycle it is of little matter to them.
  7. So a year ago I gave away my colony of red runners. I had noticed for awhile there was one nymph hiding out in my Blaberus fusca tank. This roach eventually mature in to a massive female. I saw her last alive in November. It would appear that a virgin female lives much longer than productive females. It seemed like they only lived a few months.
  8. Matttoadman

    I’m back

    i did discover that roaches make excellent feeders for fish. I have been feeding a flowerhorn several nymphs weekly. He was 2 inches in June and is over 6 now with a massive head. I am trying to remember how to make pictures fit on here
  9. Matttoadman

    I’m back

    I guess we are good until our individual states start banning them.
  10. Matttoadman

    I’m back

    I ventured back into the fish hobby and let my inverts simmer. Nothing new except some pantanal nymphs appeared in my Cyriocosmus elegans adult females container and ate her
  11. Matttoadman

    I’m back

    Hmmm I wonder how much is true lol
  12. Matttoadman

    I’m back

    I’ve been gone for a while. Did I miss anything?
  13. Matttoadman

    AAA's Roachy Horde

    Oh wow I missed it! Awesome
  14. Matttoadman

    AAA's Roachy Horde

    I’m pretty sure your pycnoscelus are trying to spell something out for you in the substrate....but it appears to be in Thai letters lol
  15. Has anyone had the opportunity to key out one of our hobby specimens to verify if these are one in the same? 

     

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