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Blatta lateralis egg cases

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ive been trying to hatch blatta lateralis egg cases forever.i get lots of egg cases but i can never hatch them.if i leave them in the bin where they are breeding they dry out. i take them out and iv'e tried to incubate them by keeping them in a small glad container with wet paper towels. right now im keeping them in the small container with a wet sock because it stays moist. does anyone know whats the fastest way besides leaving them in the tub with all the others?

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ive been trying to hatch blatta lateralis egg cases forever.i get lots of egg cases but i can never hatch them.if i leave them in the bin where they are breeding they dry out. i take them out and iv'e tried to incubate them by keeping them in a small glad container with wet paper towels. right now im keeping them in the small container with a wet sock because it stays moist. does anyone know whats the fastest way besides leaving them in the tub with all the others?

How long is forever? I got 100 nymphs in January and within weeks I had adults and egg cases. I saw no babies for nearly three months. I too thought something was wrong, but they just take a while to get going. Look out once they do. They explode! I've got over 100,000 now. I have two giant colonies in 40 gallon bins and I can't give them away fast enough. They can be measured in pounds now. The egg cases are supposed to take 20 days to hatch and they lay a new one every ten days. It seems like mine took much longer than that at first.

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I'd just like to add my experience with this species. I started with 100 mixed last year before winter. For weeks I saw ootheca being layed but not hatching. So I waited thinking it just takes longer at lower temps (70-75F). After months I had 2-3 ootheca finally hatch and I thought something is off with my enclosure. I have them in a 15 gallon glass tank with a screen lid. That was a month ago.

I since taped off the lid except a one inch gap to keep moisture in. I just fed them today and found about 4-500 new nymphs. Now I know I have things right, higher constant humidity 60+ and same temps 70-75F, I am certain I'll have more than enough nymphs now, lol. Basically though the key is slightly higher than room humidity and you will easily be overrun. :)

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I'd just like to add my experience with this species. I started with 100 mixed last year before winter. For weeks I saw ootheca being layed but not hatching. So I waited thinking it just takes longer at lower temps (70-75F). After months I had 2-3 ootheca finally hatch and I thought something is off with my enclosure. I have them in a 15 gallon glass tank with a screen lid. That was a month ago.

I since taped off the lid except a one inch gap to keep moisture in. I just fed them today and found about 4-500 new nymphs. Now I know I have things right, higher constant humidity 60+ and same temps 70-75F, I am certain I'll have more than enough nymphs now, lol. Basically though the key is slightly higher than room humidity and you will easily be overrun. :)

Are you worried about mites with the decreased ventilation and higher humidity?

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Are you worried about mites with the decreased ventilation and higher humidity?

Not really, if I get mites I'll just open the tape and let it dry out. It's not like I'll need that many lats anyway lol.

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High temperature is all they need.

They are very easy to hatch if you live in a tropical country like ours.

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I had similar difficulties. My young ones finally became adults around December and have been throwing egg cases left & right, but we couldn't get them to hatch for the life of us! I knew they needed higher humidity and being the dead of winter, our house was pretty dry. We started misting their enclosure every night and within a week, I started to see nymphs! It's definitely a humidity issue. We also added some thin foam to the bottom of the enclosure, to help hold moisture. But, I have since added a small amount of coco chunks and I think I can safely take out the foam. There are easily hundreds of nymphs now...and some are much bigger than the others, which leads me to believe that even the earlier mistings probably caused a few egg cases to hatch.

My question is: Can you tell by visual inspection if an egg case is hatched? I suppose I could go and look, but was hoping someone would just know. Do they crack open, or crawl out one at a time?

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Hey anybody,

some of yours are using a wrong name of this lateralis species.

Blatta lateralis Serville, 1838 is a synonym of Hemithyrsocera histrio (Burmeister, 1838) but I am shure it is the other species.

The right name is: Shelfordella lateralis (Walker, 1868)

see you

Ingo

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Most of us are aware of the name being Shelfordella lateralis but nobody uses it. That and the old literature lacks a bit of the proof for this if you ask me.

It's kind of like people calling vultures buzzards when a buzzard is a hawk (European term for hawk) and not a vulture at all.

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I just want to say thanks for the info. I've been having a hard time finding how to hatch Lateralis egg casings. I will be ordering 3000 sub adult for 45 delivered. I figure I can't go wrong seeing how they are cheaper then crickets. Before anybody says anything I already have Dubia but they are breeding to slow.

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I started with 1000 last year, and I now have something like 15 adults and one large nymph. They keep laying egg cases, but they aren't hatching. I'll try upping the humidity even more. Funny that this is the only species I can't get to reproduce, considering that these guys are currently invading the American Southwest.

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I started with 1000 last year, and I now have something like 15 adults and one large nymph. They keep laying egg cases, but they aren't hatching. I'll try upping the humidity even more. Funny that this is the only species I can't get to reproduce, considering that these guys are currently invading the American Southwest.

Kinda wish I lived there. They are a fun roach. Hehe

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Kinda wish I lived there. They are a fun roach. Hehe

More extermination work for you down their I would assume.

I sometimes wish I lived in range of more roach and centipede species, but some of the bugs that live where I live are still pretty impressive. Bugs EVERYWHERE are impressive.

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Yesterday I was watching mine and noticed what looked like moving dirt particles. They were, in fact, nymphs. They're pale brown in coloration and much, much smaller and more difficult to see than I initially expected. Looks like I'm finally going to be having some success.

What helped me was increased warmth and moisture; they're in an aquarium with a wooden board covering almost the entire top opening. When I take it off and reach in, it feels like a rainforest. I imagine a plastic container would be even more extreme since it holds moisture and heat much better than glass.

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