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The nymphs/adult females, don't seem to climb, but the male I collected did and very fast (accidently squished him while putting the lid on). Zephyr says they are most likely a Myrmecoblatta sp. Maybe he will be able to find out for sure as soon as I can find a few more to send him. I collected them on the underside of two different rotting logs thanks to my 6 year old who spotted the one pictured, and a nymph about half the size of this one a few days later. Hopefully the ootheca will produce a few more.

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There beautiful!! Congrats on a hard find! Now please use, find, borrow, buy a good camera or take a few to a biological station and lets see detailed pictures!!

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Zephyr has determined that they are a species of Myremecoblatta. Here is an adult male and a large nymph or adult female. I can not get a good look at the underside to determine. They are too small and too quick.

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Did the oothaca ever hatch? Did you ever send Kyle any? Very neat roaches!

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The Ootheca hatched and they were tiny. I did not have luck with them. I should have sent them to Kyle. I am going to try to go back this year and find some more.

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Aww, that sucks. Good luck finding some this year! :)

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I assume so, I can't really find anything about these, but considering the small size and the name I belive these are associated with ants in one way or another.

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So ants also endure household cockroach infestations. Yet another parallel between humans and ants. Of course, ants could argue that we don't have monsters that infiltrate hospitals posing as infants who devour the other infants without our notice. Once ant scientists study human colonies further and discover that we do, in fact, have creatures so similar to their own larva eating beetle grubs within our own seemingly alien yet surprisingly similar society, they will have yet another opportunity to myrmecopomorphize us.

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The Ootheca hatched and they were tiny. I did not have luck with them. I should have sent them to Kyle. I am going to try to go back this year and find some more.

I've been wandering...what did you use as food for these guys?

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