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I saw a breeder's list that had these beautiful roaches in pretty good price, and I think of ordering some. To be more specific, they're L. verrucosa and L. subcincta.

Is there anything I should note about their care or their special behaviour? They don't climb smooth surfaces, as far as I know. Is there any difference between the two species?

Thanks in advance!

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My L.subcincta like plenty of dead oak leaves and coconut fiber substrate to bury themselves in. I keep half the substrate moist and have pieces of cork for them to hide under. They stay hidden most of the time. They are not big eaters and as far as I can tell mainly eat dead leaves. I keep mine at room temp (about 70*F) which is probably why they are slow to reproduce, but over a 2 year period I went from 11 nymphs to about 60 now.

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My L.subcincta like plenty of dead oak leaves and coconut fiber substrate to bury themselves in. I keep half the substrate moist and have pieces of cork for them to hide under. They stay hidden most of the time. They are not big eaters and as far as I can tell mainly eat dead leaves. I keep mine at room temp (about 70*F) which is probably why they are slow to reproduce, but over a 2 year period I went from 11 nymphs to about 60 now.

Thanks! This helps a lot. How deep is your substrate? Is the other half that is not moist completely dry?

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Thanks for the replies! I will order 2-3 cms L. verrucosa nymphs, and I wonder how long it would take for them to reach adulthood at about 25 degrees C.

BTW what's that "parental care" that every keeper of the species talk about?

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My substrate is about 2 inches deep and half is completely dry and half is kept moist with regular spraying. I have found roaches hiding under cork pieces in both sides - not sure which they like better.

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My substrate is about 2 inches deep and half is completely dry and half is kept moist with regular spraying. I have found roaches hiding under cork pieces in both sides - not sure which they like better.

Thanks!

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My substrate is about 2 inches deep and half is completely dry and half is kept moist with regular spraying. I have found roaches hiding under cork pieces in both sides - not sure which they like better.

Having both choices is great. You don't have too think for them they know how much water they need and what type of substrate they want to be in.

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The shipment has just arrived. About 10 large nymphs, live and kicking! I can't wait to see them as adults and breed them in a more naturalistic setup! :)

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Here are some photos.

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Any hint on their prefered diet would be good. Also, how long will it take for these nymphs to reach adulthood at around 25 degrees C?

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Don't you just love their little orange faces? I feed mine lots of dead oak leaves and occasional carrots, cucumber, and squash. Like I said above, they do not each very enthusiastically - but if you spy on them in the middle of the night you might see some activity. I bought a red-bulb flashlight that doesn't disturb them in the dark. Best for spying - haha!

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Try taping several layers of red cellophane gift wrapping paper over the end of the flashlight. That works ok too.

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