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Cariblatta lutea

Venezillo arizonicus

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Oh wow! I have been told these are the only terrestrial isopod indigenous to the southwest deserts. Do you know if this is true? Did you find them in a desert ecosystem? If so, which? Thanks!

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Nice, been wanting to see these in culture for a while now, hope they do well for you! :)

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Oh wow! I have been told these are the only terrestrial isopod indigenous to the southwest deserts. Do you know if this is true? Did you find them in a desert ecosystem? If so, which? Thanks!

I'm not sure, but since V. californicus also lives in the west I assume it's not true. I found some in mountains where it was wet and green, but have also found them in desert-ish area where 30+ specimens were hiding in a rat burrow.

Nice, been wanting to see these in culture for a while now, hope they do well for you! :)

Thanks :) Hopefully they'll prove to be easier than what people claim

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so whats your technique on harvesting burrows? most all burrows around here (AZ) are underground usually under a bush, some are piles of wood and/or rock. are you just digging them up or flooding them?

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so whats your technique on harvesting burrows? most all burrows around here (AZ) are underground usually under a bush, some are piles of wood and/or rock. are you just digging them up or flooding them?

I just dug them up using my hand, which was risky thanks to scorps and rattlesnake but the result was worth it.

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I just dug them up using my hand, which was risky thanks to scorps and rattlesnake but the result was worth it.

Well did you at least put a stick down the holes or anything to see if there were rattlers or not!? Those things are dangerous man, you're crazy, (and lucky as heck)!! :lol:

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Well did you at least put a stick down the holes or anything to see if there were rattlers or not!? Those things are dangerous man, you're crazy, (and lucky as heck)!! :lol:

Whelp...once I saw my first Arenivaga my frontal lobe turned off. LOL

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Whelp...once I saw my first Arenivaga my frontal lobe turned off. LOL

Lol oh well, seems like you had plenty of success using that method, though next time you may want to be a little more careful, maybe bring a good flashlight and long stick to test the safety of the burrows. Definitely don't want to get bit by a rattler, and it's their active season too.

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Lol oh well, seems like you had plenty of success using that method, though next time you may want to be a little more careful, maybe bring a good flashlight and long stick to test the safety of the burrows. Definitely don't want to get bit by a rattler, and it's their active season too.

Thanks for the tip. Will try that on the next trip :)

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Honestly they look quite lame. lol

But at least these are genuine all- american isopods and not that everyday, introduced European drivel.

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Found two newborns in the enclosure!

Congrats! Hopefully there's a lot more where those came from! :)

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Any updates on these, have they been steadily reproducing for you?

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35 minutes ago, All About Insects said:

Any updates on these, have they been steadily reproducing for you?

No :( I only see 5 babies in the enclosure. All the adults are still alive though. 

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34 minutes ago, Cariblatta lutea said:

No :( I only see 5 babies in the enclosure. All the adults are still alive though. 

Is that usual for these guys, or are they just really hard to breed?

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1 hour ago, Cariblatta lutea said:

No :( I only see 5 babies in the enclosure. All the adults are still alive though. 

Well at least the adults are still alive, hopefully you'll get more offspring soon!

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