Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Randomjoe

Looking for suggestions on what to get next

Recommended Posts

Now that its warmed up I'm trying to decide what to get next. Currently I have G. portentosa, B. dubia, E. posticus, B. sp. Venezuela, and B. cf. chacoensis. I'm planing on getting S. lateralis to use as feeders for my tarantulas and scorpions and would like to get a couple other species to keep as pets. The only real requirement is they need to be able to be used as feeders for population control. I also have a bearded dragon, a leopard gecko and 2 crested geckos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could go for a slow growing species from the Corydiinae subfamily. For example an Arenivaga, Eupolyphaga or Polyphaga species?  They are easy and handsome (in my biased opinion). 
Their reproduction is rather slow, so it will certainly take a while before you start thinking of them as a 'feeder'. On the other hand, once you do get there, I'm not sure if all recipients on the other side of the feeder business can palate these roaches. Perhaps it's better to sell them by that time. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gyna lurida or G. caffrorum are great pet roaches that can be used as feeders when their populations get too large. Adults should be about the right size for those herps too. Panchlora is a good genus of pet/feeder roaches too, though they may be too small unless you get Panchlora sp. "giant". Corydiids make for super easy pets and I agree stanislas that they're quite handsome, but you'd be much better off selling the nymphs once you have a good sized colony (that will be well down the road because they are slow growing/reproducing). Members of that family go for a pretty good price nowadays, whereas the more common blaberids Gyna and Panchlora are quite cheap and grow quickly. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you get Corydidarum pygmaea you'll never have to worry about their population getting too large, they take forever to grow and reproduce, so cultures take a long time to start up. Additionally, whenever you do find yourself with a bunch of them, you can always sell them off, they are highly desirable and go for a high price! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/26/2017 at 0:35 PM, stanislas said:

You could go for a slow growing species from the Corydiinae subfamily. For example an Arenivaga, Eupolyphaga or Polyphaga species?  They are easy and handsome (in my biased opinion). 
Their reproduction is rather slow, so it will certainly take a while before you start thinking of them as a 'feeder'. On the other hand, once you do get there, I'm not sure if all recipients on the other side of the feeder business can palate these roaches. Perhaps it's better to sell them by that time. 

I do like the looks of the Arenivaga

 

On 4/26/2017 at 0:42 PM, pannaking22 said:

Gyna lurida or G. caffrorum are great pet roaches that can be used as feeders when their populations get too large. Adults should be about the right size for those herps too. Panchlora is a good genus of pet/feeder roaches too, though they may be too small unless you get Panchlora sp. "giant". Corydiids make for super easy pets and I agree stanislas that they're quite handsome, but you'd be much better off selling the nymphs once you have a good sized colony (that will be well down the road because they are slow growing/reproducing). Members of that family go for a pretty good price nowadays, whereas the more common blaberids Gyna and Panchlora are quite cheap and grow quickly. 

G. lurida yellow or G. caffrorum are a likely possibility.

 

23 hours ago, Hisserdude said:

If you get Corydidarum pygmaea you'll never have to worry about their population getting too large, they take forever to grow and reproduce, so cultures take a long time to start up. Additionally, whenever you do find yourself with a bunch of them, you can always sell them off, they are highly desirable and go for a high price! ;)

These look neat.

Thanks for the replies I'll have to read up on all of these to see if I'm confident in trying them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×