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MooreInverts

Parcoblatta fulvescens Flight?

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I've been revisiting my roach notes and I'm on the quest for the most ideal feeder roach to get next. I've now had some more experience with my current species and I'm starting to figure out what I like best. As my collection grows, I'll need a faster breeding species soon enough. I keep little kenyans and p. couloniana, but the former are only good for the little insectivores and the goblins don't breed fast enough for the long haul.

Unfortunately, most of the options I have possess some serious negatives. Of all the species I've found though, I'm happy to say that I think fulvous wood roaches of all things seem (nearly) perfect for me.

They have a wide temperature range, breed quickly, females and nymphs are pretty, they can't infest, and they don't burrow! They have all my favorite traits from my red goblins but have faster breeding, and they're so ideal! They seem perfect, but the males have me pretty concerned. I'm aware that they can fly, and it makes me horrifically anxious. I've had so many horrible experiences with beetles getting trapped in my hair during summer nights (as many as five in there at once) and anything with non-obvious wings are really unnerving to me, so it's pretty clear that flying roaches are not an exciting prospect. I want to hear from others though.

So how bad are flying roaches, really? Does this species fly frequently? What do you do if one escapes? Do they fly less if they have more shelter? And most importantly, is there anyone else out there who was iffy about fliers too? Was it worth taking the plunge into flying species even if you were nervous at first?

 

EDIT: I almost forgot. I'm aware that they're a little small. How do they compare to others in the genus, like the larger p. lata? They're both such gorgeous species, and it's nice that p. lata are much larger. Do they produce as much as the fulvous do?

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I've had this species, and I've never seen the males fly, I know they can though. They are very good climbers as adults however, and are very fast, so prepare for that lol!

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That's good to know! Are they fast in general, or only when startled? I notice that the red goblins readily climb and absolutely panic if they lose their shelter. They can be darn fast when they want to or are spooked, but with lots of shelter they hardly ever climb and are pretty chill.

How do parcoblatta compare to that? Does shelter help them feel calmer, or are they constantly "gotta-go-fast"?

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1 hour ago, MooreInverts said:

That's good to know! Are they fast in general, or only when startled? I notice that the red goblins readily climb and absolutely panic if they lose their shelter. They can be darn fast when they want to or are spooked, but with lots of shelter they hardly ever climb and are pretty chill.

How do parcoblatta compare to that? Does shelter help them feel calmer, or are they constantly "gotta-go-fast"?

They are pretty fast just in general, most of the Parcoblatta species I've kept have been pretty calm when I open their enclosures and check up on them, but these guys went freaking insane when I opened their lid, with the adults all racing to the top. Definitely not a fun species to deal with, it's part of the reason I sold mine off, (that, and they were so prolific, and I just didn't have anything to feed them to).

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Oh my goodness. Well, this is why I ask, haha!! This is REALLY good to know, thank you. How do you feel about other parcoblatta? Even if I don't use the genus as feeders, I'm really in love with their appearance, especially B. lata. Just a general opinion, I mean.

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2 hours ago, MooreInverts said:

Oh my goodness. Well, this is why I ask, haha!! This is REALLY good to know, thank you. How do you feel about other parcoblatta? Even if I don't use the genus as feeders, I'm really in love with their appearance, especially B. lata. Just a general opinion, I mean.

They are pretty cool, I've found most species relatively easy to care for, and most are rather laid back, unless you sufficiently disturb them. :)

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I don’t have any real fear of being flown at or creeped on by an invert. I got a megaorbweaver inside my shirt some time ago after walking into the web. No big deal, though the legs were quite itch-inducing.

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