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Narceus gordanus Care

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Does anyone know how to care for these? I purchased three from a local expo, however two passed later in the day. One continues to thrive so I don't think my setup/care is the cause of their deaths, however I still want to make sure I take care of them right. I'm getting the dead ones replaced and want to avoid this predicament again. If anyone has nay theories on why they died please let me know!

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Their care is pretty much identical to most other millipedes, although they like cooler temperatures than some of the tropical species. They are spirobolids as well, meaning quality rotting wood in quantity is necessary to keep them healthy.

What temperature were you keeping them at, and did the substrate dry out? Was there obvious cracks or scars in their exoskeletons? Were they lethargic when you first got them? If you can answer these questions it will be easier to determine the cause of death.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Arthroverts

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2 hours ago, Arthroverts said:

Their care is pretty much identical to most other millipedes, although they like cooler temperatures than some of the tropical species. They are spirobolids as well, meaning quality rotting wood in quantity is necessary to keep them healthy.

What temperature were you keeping them at, and did the substrate dry out? Was there obvious cracks or scars in their exoskeletons? Were they lethargic when you first got them? If you can answer these questions it will be easier to determine the cause of death.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Arthroverts

Temps 75-76 F; moist substrate; I do believe there were a couple scars; one seemed letharigic when the seller packaged them.

I just went back and replaced the dead ones, these ones are younger and livelier. 

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Scarred and lethargic millipedes are usually not a safe bet to purchase, you want lively specimens with no apparent damage or scarring. They might not have been fed well or had been dropped, resulting in death later on. 

Anyway, good luck with your new specimens!

 

Arthroverts

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