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Bugboy3092

Capturing/collecting roaches

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For sure, at least some of us are located in areas where there may be native/introduced species that make a great cultivar, though not all of us. I’ve been trying to capture adults of the species pseudomops septentrionalis (pale bordered field roach, which is actually the species pictured in the allpet roaches sign above) but they seem to be quite elusive. I haven’t really been able to find much info on the wild habits of the species, I’m searching in an area where I have seen an adult before, but failed to capture it. Maybe using a sweep net along the edges of fields would work? I’m not sure, so hopefully someone here can help. Aside from them we’ve also got my favorite native species (cryptocercus wrighti) in the area (I’ve seen, and tried to keep adults in the past, but back then I wasn’t very good at keeping insects, and thus they died), does anyone know a better method of collection besides cutting into rotten logs? This practice is quite destructive and I’m trying to cut back on it (however, the promise of cryptocercus makes it pretty hard haha) and thus would like to find a better way of collecting them. Aside from that, we’ve also got the fairly common parcoblatta, as well as the definitely common German roaches (forgot the Latin name) and smoky brown roaches (once again, forgot the name) I also know a place where it is easy to collect panchlora (I’m almost certain they’re the “giant” panchlora Nivea, I feel like I remember them being about twice the size of the normal ones). I’m gonna have to go back there soon. 

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I get those in my yard sometimes. Found them on corn plants a couple of times, in shrubs, never on the ground. Accidentally caught one in a sweep net. Go with the sweep net, along the sides of a cornfield if you can, see what pops out. They seem to mimic fireflies, probably due to fireflies' noxious contents, so look where fireflies can be found resting. 

To see what lives in a rotting log with minimal disturbance, turn the log over, pull a couple pieces of bark off, then put it back the way it was. 

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On 8/7/2018 at 8:00 AM, Bugboy3092 said:

  (I’m almost certain they’re the “giant” panchlora Nivea, I feel like I remember them being about twice the size of the normal ones). I’m gonna have to go back there soon. 

According to Bugguide, P. nivea is the only wild US species. The giant Panchlora is not nivea, but an unknown species.

 

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Interesting, I definitely need to head back there then! Speaking of heading to places, I’m going to New Mexico on the 21st, any species I should be on the lookout for while there?

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