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Not much info on these gorgeous little buddies, beyond comparisons to G. portentosa. I read an article concerning the latter and how they form bonds with individuals that take the time to pet them. They learn the scent, and react hissy towards strangers.

I have been bonding with my male daily, leaving the obviously gravid female on her own because i do not want to risk stressing her into miscarrying. I am not sure if he enjoys the light pets i give him, but he has however grown quite tolerant of my affection. At first he never stopped hissing when i touched him, then transitioning into objectionable hisses when he was removed from his enclosure for petting but not hissing a peep once he was in my hands. We've now reached the point of total calmness when he is removed and petted.

Is there a resource I can't seem to find that goes into greater detail about this sp? I am not sure how similar javanica and portentosa truly are beyond similar care and behavior. I am interested in the relationship they and similar species have with humans, and why they grow tolerant for such a primitive insect as if they can indeed form a bond with another species. My first guess is their communal nature, but i feel there is a lot more to learn from this species.

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I think I've read the paper you are discussing, and I've also done some similar work, both in formal experiments, and as classroom demonstrations.

Essentially, the disturbance his is a reaction to alarming stimuli. It clearly occurs in response to touch, but I think they also respond to movement and visual stimuli. Once alarmed, most individuals usually only his a few times, if any. A few will hiss dozens of times after startled. I've also noticed they are more likely to hiss when they have an opportunity to run back to their colony. I'm not sure if the function is to startle potential predators, or if they are alerting their fellow hissers.

The reduction in hissing you are describing is likely habituation. Even very simple animals can learn to reduce their responses with repeated stimulation. Animals much simpler than cockroaches are capable of this. As long as the alarming stimulus is not too intense, most hissers will habituate to these stimuli over time. You may also notice that hissers that are not handled frequently will quickly run and willingly drop of your hand, while a hisser that is more accustomed to handling will calmly walk around even on the underside of your hand. I think the dropping response is another deliberate anti-predation strategy. When they are calm, they cling to whatever surface they are on.

In terms of bonding, I don't beleive you are seeing what would be considered a traditional bond. Instead of bonding with you, your hisser is learning not to be alarmed by your presence. Since he is not alarmed, he is not hissing or running away. He can now act more calmly and naturally when you are with him. If he is hungry, you could likely feed him. Any of his natural behavior may occur now. I've also known some very territorial male hissers that, once they are not alarmed by humans, will actually fight with humans. If your hands get too close to their spot, they will give your finger a good shove! They are fun little animals, and there is definitely "more going on in there" than most people would think. 

 

 

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Invertebrates don't really have the capacity to bond with you. You can keep handling certain individuals so that they stop perceiving you as athreat, but others will continue to try and defend themselves no matter what. They won't really recognize you as the owner.

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For an animal to form a social bond with something other than its species, it has to be an animal that's capable of social bonds in the first place, and has to recognize something of itself (body language, etc) in that other species. Roaches may be capable of the first, but wouldn't be able to understand that a human is a living thing, as opposed to a force of nature.

However, many animals, from insects to reptiles, can learn to recognize and respond neutrally/positively to a specific human. They can learn not to see you as a threat, and even to associate you with food, new toys (for reptiles), and other positive stimuli. That's a bond, of a sort, and is pretty impressive to get out of an animal so much smaller than you. You've made a creature that you could crush in an instant see you as a safe and interesting thing instead of a threat. On some level, they can learn to like you, because you have food, but they don't like you because of you like social animals would. They're not going to like you like, say, a rat would. 

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