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Arthroverts

Any hope for the deregulation of millipedes?

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Hey all, with the (relatively) recent deregulation of 3 Goliathus sp. and multiple roach species I am wondering if there is any hope that exotic millipedes will be deregulated in the US? I believe they are banned under the Lacey Act, which protects US agriculture, but millipedes are detrivores that starve without adequate rotting vegetation. To my knowledge, hobby species that have become established within the US (such as Trigoniulus corallinus and Anadenobolus monilicornis in Florida) haven't damaged native ecosystems, agriculture, or harmed local populations of millipedes, not to mention that most species would likely be unable to establish populations outside of Florida. I can't speak to invasive non-hobby species such as the various small julids and Oxidus gracilis, but for the most part it appears that the non-native spirostreptids and spirobolids kept in captivity (possibly other platy-and-polydesmids, sphaerotheriids, and glomerids as well) would be of very little, if any, threat to local ecosystems and agriculture.

Anyway, back to the original question: is there any hope that exotic millipedes will be deregulated in the US? Do we have any Senators that are sympathetic to our cause (I'm half-joking on this one)? Or will we have to continue to watch Europeans collection's grow our own availability languishes?

Thanks,

Arthroverts

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Trigoniulus corallinus and Anadenobolus monilicornis were established by agriculture.  Those are tiny, unimpressive species that were never kept or heard of before they plagued Florida after introduction with ornamental plants. There are NO species introduced by the hobby. Millipedes were not regulated prior to 2006 and were still being imported legally. 

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Thanks for helping to clear that up @Allpet Roaches. I am aware that they were legal to import prior to 2006, but I want to know if there is a chance that they might be deregulated in the future, as insofar the evidence has shown that they would not cause problems even if they did escape.

Thanks,

Arthroverts

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On 9/18/2019 at 6:12 PM, Arthroverts said:

Hey all, with the (relatively) recent deregulation of 3 Goliathus sp. and multiple roach species I am wondering if there is any hope that exotic millipedes will be deregulated in the US? I believe they are banned under the Lacey Act, which protects US agriculture, but millipedes are detrivores that starve without adequate rotting vegetation. To my knowledge, hobby species that have become established within the US (such as Trigoniulus corallinus and Anadenobolus monilicornis in Florida) haven't damaged native ecosystems, agriculture, or harmed local populations of millipedes, not to mention that most species would likely be unable to establish populations outside of Florida. I can't speak to invasive non-hobby species such as the various small julids and Oxidus gracilis, but for the most part it appears that the non-native spirostreptids and spirobolids kept in captivity (possibly other platy-and-polydesmids, sphaerotheriids, and glomerids as well) would be of very little, if any, threat to local ecosystems and agriculture.

Anyway, back to the original question: is there any hope that exotic millipedes will be deregulated in the US? Do we have any Senators that are sympathetic to our cause (I'm half-joking on this one)? Or will we have to continue to watch Europeans collection's grow our own availability languishes?

Thanks,

Arthroverts

First, as far as I know, the Lacey Act has never been used to regulate pet arthropods. It is the Plant Protection Act. I have the permits for many exotic millipede species, even imported individuals. Naturalized, and of course native species, are not regulated within the Continental US. I have been trying to encourage the USDA to allow commercial biological supply permits for Thyropygus, as it has been replacing Archispirostreptus in museums. 

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I would likely have permits too, except I can't get a permit until a later time (I also have many family members living with me, which I'm sure the USDA/APHIS would not be happy about).

Lastly, I was just reading about the Plant Protection Act, and apparently Paragraph 2 says that anyone can petition the Secretary to add or remove plant pests from regulation. Is this something we should look into further for millipedes?

I know this might be coming across as fanatical (ha ha), but if there is anyway that we can get exotic millipedes deregulated, I am interested in pursuing it. I am starting to get tired of only seeing tiny Bumblebees, even tinier Scarlets, and the average Narceus or Chicobolus available.

Thanks,

Arthroverts

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2 hours ago, Arthroverts said:

That may be true, but millipedes aren't insects, rather being of the subphylum Myriapoda. 

I meant arthropod, and I changed it to prevent any confusion. 

2 hours ago, Arthroverts said:

I would likely have permits too, except I can't get a permit until a later time (I also have many family members living with me, which I'm sure the USDA/APHIS would not be happy about).

I live in a family of six. It is not an issue. 

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1 minute ago, The Mantis Menagerie said:

I meant arthropod, and I changed it to prevent any confusion. 

I live in a family of six. It is not an issue. 

Gotcha.

I am going to PM you to discuss the permitting process further; I've been meaning to for a little while now, as I have a few specific questions.

Thanks,

Arthroverts

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2 hours ago, mantisfan101 said:

Are all US-native and naturalized species not regulated by the USDA?

Yes

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On 9/20/2019 at 1:32 PM, The Mantis Menagerie said:

First, as far as I know, the Lacey Act has never been used to regulate pet arthropods.

What about Typhochlaena seladonia? Thought the reason they were basically banned in the US was because Brazil wanted to US government to enforce the Lacey Act for their endemic species? (A bit ironic, considering their government's response to the amazon fires...). 

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21 minutes ago, Hisserdude said:

What about Typhochlaena seladonia? Thought the reason they were basically banned in the US was because Brazil wanted to US government to enforce the Lacey Act for their endemic species? (A bit ironic, considering their government's response to the amazon fires...). 

CITES and ESA also restrict some species, but none of these are the cause of the APHIS regulations. I guess I did word that way too broadly. 

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On 9/23/2019 at 7:32 PM, The Mantis Menagerie said:

CITES and ESA also restrict some species, but none of these are the cause of the APHIS regulations. I guess I did word that way too broadly. 

Yeah, that's what I thought, just wanted to be sure though! :)

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