Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/22/2021 in Posts

  1. Also check out Pycnoscelus surinamensis, they have rapidly consumed anything I've thrown into their bin. Tolerant of bone dry to quite literally soaking wet substrate. extremely good at aerating the soil, have yet to do further testing but so far I've found they can dig to at least 8" of substate.
    2 points
  2. I've got hatchlings! 😁 Actually found my first hatchlings a couple weeks ago, this species is a challenging one to breed, but worth it IMO, one of the most unique Ectobiids that can be found in the US! The hatchlings are SO small, about a mm long, and with very little mass to them. This one's a second instar I believe... so about 2 mms long. 😂
    2 points
  3. Thanks! I have not been out to collect much yet but I know there is great potential in the area based on what I've seen while outside wandering around. My best find has been an eyed click beetle, which had gotten into my house and was making a racket in the hallway
    2 points
  4. Check out how big one of my question marks is. Next to a dime. Her pronotum overlaps her wings slightly which is weird.
    1 point
  5. I may have missed posting info for the September meeting, but rest assured there was no catastrophic club melt-down and that meeting still happened, ha ha. The October meeting will be on the 16th, from 10:00-11:30 AM, on Skype. As per usual invertebrates will be discussed, and I would like to discuss the topic of next year's calendar (return to physical meetings hopefully!) and the funding of a new club website/club library as well. Looking forward to seeing all who can make it! Thanks, Arthroverts
    1 point
  6. I was having issues with my P. pallida, at first I was only using vaseline but then I started using some window screen as a second "lid". The pliable nature of the screen seems to fill in any gaps in my container's lid(just a normal plastic tub full of plenty gaps). I do find some roaches on the roof of the screen(I just tap them off before removing the lid) but I'm no longer getting escapees. You can probably use any breathable fabric and adjust the thickness of the edge till gaps are filled.
    1 point
  7. Best roaches ever, you are sure to like them.
    1 point
  8. Hello all! Sending greetings from Georgia! I have two female Madagascar hissing roaches as my insect kiddos! I also keep a few different species of animals (not any other insects sadly). But, I got my two girls from someone who was giving them away back in January. I've always been into insects, though honestly, I'm into all critters. But I've raised caterpillars since I was little, I rescue and keep flightless wasps, bees, and butterflies I find, and I enjoy finding insects in our backyard that I can hold. I don't know much about the entomology world, so by joining this forum I'm hoping to expand that knowledge.
    1 point
  9. I still remember my first hissers in 1980. They had such a special smell and feel of uniqueness that is entirely lost on me now.
    1 point
  10. Thanks y'all! I'm sure I will 🙂
    1 point
  11. Not sure about @Mwewe's species, but at least some of them do also provide.....exploratory bites. 😅 They're not TERRIBLE, but shocking enough to where I've involuntarily jumped on the 1 or 2 occasions where I was bitten and hastily went back inside my house to contemplate why the bug gods had forsaken me so. 😢🤣
    1 point
  12. Huh, that actually looks like exactly what you have. Must be feeding on other insects in the tub, so probably neutral or actually beneficial to have in there (other than them possibly biting you out of defense if grabbed or squished).
    1 point
  13. I've got three adult males and an adult female now! The males are much more yellowish than I expected, only a very faint green, but they also have two reddish brown stripes going down the first half of their tegmina, kinda neat. The females on the other hand lack any such markings and are definitely more green, but still very pale, with an almost silvery sheen to them. Here are some pictures, first of a male: And now here is a female: Wish me luck in breeding these beauties and getting them established in US Blatticulture!
    1 point
  14. Welcome! There are tons of great invertebrates in Texas.
    1 point
  15. Those do look like true bugs of some sort, (hence the bedbug-like look), but they are not bed bugs. Not sure what they are specifically, but based on the fact they are in a compost bin, probably predators of small invertebrates, (I don't think any true bugs are detritivores, they either drink plant sap or are predatory).
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...