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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/02/2020 in Posts

  1. Roachforum is the oldest of the existing invertebrate forums. Thanks to every member and especially Peter of BIC for keeping it alive. The costs and competing groups that come and go could easily have fizzled it out without such support.
    7 points
  2. Got the opportunity to draw some of my roaches for a school assignment These are just sketches, but I would love to do some nicely rendered art of them soon. I would love to see more art of bugs while I'm here! If any of y'all wanna share your art here, please do
    5 points
  3. Now in culture there are adults of both sexes. Some females already have ooteca. I hope for a rich brood Male on the photo:
    5 points
  4. Check out how big one of my question marks is. Next to a dime. Her pronotum overlaps her wings slightly which is weird.
    4 points
  5. No, I just never bothered trying to get the UCR strain. It's hard enough trying to keep every bug on earth without trying to keep every strain.
    4 points
  6. Congrats on getting this beautiful species! Though Orin and Peter are the definitive experts on them in the hobby, I've been keeping them for about 7 months now, with a fair amount of success. The starting culture I work with is quite large due to its long term purpose, but I know of people who have successfully been able to culture large amounts out of groups as small as six. You'll get anywhere from 15-30 babies out of one successful pairing, though god knows it takes a while. In most cases adulthood takes about 8 months to reach, and gestation ranges 3-5. I have been told however, that these periods can be shortened if greater heat is provided, though I have not tried this myself. I keep my two groups in highly ventilated bins on a few inches of coconut husk topped by leaf litter, with slightly moist sphagnum in one corner to increase humidity. I provide both cork bark and egg cartons which serve (along with a high protein diet) to decrease antennae and wing biting. I will lightly mist the substrate once daily, and provide varied produce and protein sources, along with a consistent container of calcium fortified cricket gel. This setup has allowed me to see significant growth in my group of nymphs, and I have observed continued breeding in the large mixed colony I was able to purchase last month. Hopefully I will be seeing more babies soon! Oh, and I'm sure you've already figured this out, but your enclosure need to be crazy secure. Crazy secure. I hope this is a helpful report of my experience with this species, I want to end it by thanking the people from whom much of this care information came. A huge thank you to @Peter Clausen@Allpet Roaches@pannaking22@Hisserdude and the many, many others both on and off this forum who have contributed towards my work with this species. I wouldn't be able to work with these incredible roaches if these folks hadn't. Thank you all!
    4 points
  7. I don't think Flamingswampert was offended but then I also don't know what his/her short, non-descript message meant. I think it meant ignore the chatter but it could mean feathers are lighter than stones. I don't remember anyone questioning the validity of the extinct designation before but of course we still can't prove big dinosaurs are extinct with 100% certainty. I recall a movie suggesting a lost world full of them is in the hollow earth beneath an artificial sun. There maybe some Simandoa there too.
    4 points
  8. First time ever available in electronic format. Available through Coachwhip Books https://coachwhip.com/collections/invertebrate-pets/products/invertebrates-magazine-2001-2002 there are dozens of cockroach articles and features.
    4 points
  9. All relative sizes should be correct as I tried to maintain same reproduction ratio while taking the photos. If any mistake exist, should be really minor.
    3 points
  10. In early May, I received material from Uzbekistan, collected in three locations: a clay desert near the city of Termez (extreme south), from the surrounding sandy massifs of the year of Bukhara and from the sandy desert of the Nurata nature reserve. Naturally, all the material came unnamed. I, the person involved in this group, have previously identified the material in my laboratory. As a result: an adult female from the vicinity of the city of Termez turned out to be Polyphaga saussurei; three females from the sands of Bukhara - Polyphaga indica vitripennis (why exactly ssp. vitripennis - because the nominative subspecies does not occur on the territory of the former USSR); two subadult females and a subadult male from the Nurata Nature Reserve are also P. indica vitripennis. The adult females from the first two locations were unambiguously fertilized in nature and began to lay ootheca on the way. Females from the Nurata Nature Reserve, and later the male, molted into adults. And now, just yesterday, I discovered that both of them immediately begin to form ooteca. We will conduct laboratory observations of this material. I think that with such a high productivity, there is a chance to introduce this material into laboratory culture. Вот самец P. indica vitripennis:
    3 points
  11. Two females with ootheca. Finally, I got the first results! The male did a good job!
    3 points
  12. Found about a dozen babies in the enclosure the other day, after a gestation period of approximately 6 months. I've officially bred all three Panesthiinae species in my collection, yay!
    3 points
  13. One of the females of Elliptorhina davidi gave birth to about two dozen nymphs. This is very wonderful, but of course there are well-founded fears for them, as well as for the whole group as a whole. We can only wait and hope My conditions are standard for all Gromphadorhini: humidity is minimal, like in the desert, a wick drinker is installed, the substrate is wheat bran, shelters are egg trays, food is apples, carrots and gammarus. In such conditions, I reproduce well - Aeluropoda insignis, Elliptorhina chopardi, E. cf. coquereliana, E. javanica, E. laevigata, Gromphadorhina oblongonota, G. portentosa, G. portentosa ‘Black’, Gromphadorhina sp., Princisia vanwaerebeki, P. vanwaerebeki ‘Big’, P. vanwaerebeki ‘Black & White’.
    3 points
  14. Finally gave birth! About (or more) 20 nymphs. Another female also had mating, now we are waiting for her to give birth Everyone is not visible in the photo, since they are smartly hiding:
    3 points
  15. Earlier this week, I was presented with 7 middle aged nymphs Therea nuptialis (Gerstaecker, 1861). This species is very rare in culture, and for me, collecting Corydiinae, this is a very desirable acquisition. I hope that after the nymphs enter the imago, I will be able to get a sufficient number of ootheca and consolidate the species in my culture.
    3 points
  16. Substrate seems to be mainly a difference of pets vs feeders. Standard feeder containers make maximum use of vertical space with egg crates to pack a lot of roaches into a bin. That's the only function of egg crates. Zero substrate, is very easy to clean the dry frass, dead, and molts while not spending much time on the maintenance. I think of this as how people feed insectivores with the least amount of space and effort spent. Extra moisture in a bin with only paper, frass, roaches, and food can quickly lead to bacteria, fungus, pest insects, etc. On the other hand naturalistic containers with substrate, bark, leaves, branches, etc are perfectly fine. You're just replicating nature. There are hundreds of pictures of similar setups in the forum here. It's how tons more people including myself have kept reptiles for years also. The big difference is that the feeder bin i described previously isn't bio active. A little extra moisture (for short periods) in a naturalistic bin is perfectly fine when roaches are low density, and in balance. If someone thinks dirt and moisture are what kill cockroaches, there isn't much point arguing with them lol.
    3 points
  17. I'd say remember to feed and water them regularly, it may not seem like great advice but care is usually the only really important thing. I also recommend this book: https://www.amazon.com/Love-Cockroaches-Husbandry-Biology-Blattodea/dp/1616464275
    3 points
  18. Cockroaches are resilient and all, but their resistance to nuclear radiation is a bit exaggerated I think... If any animal group could be considered the "chosen ones", it's gotta be Tardigrades, those things can survive the vacuum of space and are quite radiation resistant.
    3 points
  19. Now in the US hobby! 😁 Unfortunately these individuals were not mine to keep, but I should be getting some next year when their new owners breed them! In any case, I was able to snag a few pictures of some nymphs while they were briefly in my possession, enjoy! Closely related to Lanxoblatta, and similar to them in care.
    2 points
  20. Also check out Pycnoscelus surinamensis, they have rapidly consumed anything I've thrown into their bin. Tolerant of bone dry to quite literally soaking wet substrate. extremely good at aerating the soil, have yet to do further testing but so far I've found they can dig to at least 8" of substate.
    2 points
  21. Thanks! I have not been out to collect much yet but I know there is great potential in the area based on what I've seen while outside wandering around. My best find has been an eyed click beetle, which had gotten into my house and was making a racket in the hallway
    2 points
  22. Not sure about @Mwewe's species, but at least some of them do also provide.....exploratory bites. 😅 They're not TERRIBLE, but shocking enough to where I've involuntarily jumped on the 1 or 2 occasions where I was bitten and hastily went back inside my house to contemplate why the bug gods had forsaken me so. 😢🤣
    2 points
  23. Hey there! The things to keep in mind with most gyna species is temperature and humidity in my experience. Gyna centurio need to be kept at a minimum in the upper seventies range but will thrive and grow faster in the low eighties (80-82 would be optimal). A nice deep substrate that would hold moisture is needed for nymphs to burrow and relieve stress. Keep in mind to not flood the substrate as good ventilation is also needed (don’t want a swamp in there that would prove to be disastrous), mist the substrate one to two times a day thoroughly as needed. A good, deep coconut fiber bedding with dead hardwood leaves or lots of hides will do nicely. Make sure to not pack the bedding in as good aeration will be needed, always think no swamp, no swamp in your head as stated above hahah. Finally gyna LOVE Fruit and provide a roach protein source (I like fish flakes for my roach species) and I think you’ll be Golden 😊
    2 points
  24. I've got three adult males and an adult female now! The males are much more yellowish than I expected, only a very faint green, but they also have two reddish brown stripes going down the first half of their tegmina, kinda neat. The females on the other hand lack any such markings and are definitely more green, but still very pale, with an almost silvery sheen to them. Here are some pictures, first of a male: And now here is a female: Wish me luck in breeding these beauties and getting them established in US Blatticulture!
    2 points
  25. Here is some of the color variation from my colony. Now that I have over 500+ individuals, i am prep to separate them by color/tone.
    2 points
  26. Yes, they are very beautiful, males look like ghosts)))) It's a pity that we won't be able to communicate in the messenger, I don't know English, but I speak Spanish very badly. But we have already found a common language and even made a little friendship We also have a common acquaintance, my friend - Philip Byzov Don't you want to learn Russian?
    2 points
  27. In my collection there is a culture that we designated as Ergaula sp. Kinabatangan, Borneo, as the material was collected by one of our Russian keepers along the Kinabatangan River, in the east of Kalimantan Island (Borneo), several years ago. These cockroaches differ from the species already present in culture - E. capucina (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1893) and E. pilosa (Walker, 1868). These are smaller cockroaches, the males of which have an almost solid black (rarely with a small light spot in the middle) color, capable of rapid active flight. Females have a more prominent pronotum and sculpted surface of the first pair of wings. This material is very similar to the photographs (not typical) of the samples presented on the E. pilosa page of the site [http://cockroach.speciesfile.org/Common/basic/Taxa.aspx?TaxonNameID=1177988]. In turn, these samples are not at all similar to what we usually call in culture as E. pilosa. There are two opinions: either the site has not correctly identified the material, or what we have called E. pilosa is not. What are your opinions? Here's my sample:
    2 points
  28. In my laboratory it is 25-27 ° C during the day, and at night it drops to 22 ° C. In general, of course, the most favorable daytime temperature for all crops in general is from 30-35 C °, but I do not use heating devices due to energy savings. A friend was in the south-west of Madagascar and said that the temperature there is monstrous, the heat is unbearable, and the humidity in the area of these very thorny woodlands is practically zero, that is, it is actually a very dry desert. Where cockroaches sit, it is also dry, but at least cooler by 2-5 C °. There is no available water or food containing moisture, except for the leaves and stems of succulents.
    2 points
  29. One of the Simandoa conserfariam females brought another (already the second in the group) brood. It is difficult to count the number of individuals, but in any case there are at least twenty cubs. The nymphs of the first brood grow together, however, I want to note that they do not grow as fast as most other species. In the group, judging by the enlarged abdomens, there are still pregnant females. Separately, I would like to note that cockroaches of this species are very demanding on the presence of animal protein: they fiercely eat the corpses of their old fellow tribesmen and literally tear them apart, trying to take a piece from a neighbor.
    2 points
  30. I brought over 100 Polyphaga saussurei cockroaches from the Kyzylkum desert. These are adults and nymphs of different ages and sex. Females now systematically produce ootheca, which are incubated separately. I do not plan to sell my cockroaches, but my dream is to create a wonderful, full-fledged culture of this species, where there are both females and males. As far as I know, all existing cultures are parthenogenetic, so I have a unique experiment In the photo there is a male and a female from my collection
    2 points
  31. Got new species of Peresphaerinae. These are Corydidarum magnifica, C. tarsalis, C. pygmaeus, C. sp. Japan and Bantua sp. Namibia. In some cultures there are already adults and as a result, there is every reason to expect offspring Corydidarum magnifica C. tarsalis C. pygmaeus Bantua sp. Namibia Photo by C. sp. Japan I did not publish, since they are outwardly similar to C. pygmaea.
    2 points
  32. I have two subspecies Panesthia angustipennis - P. a. cognata and P. a. angustipennis. As you know, they grow and develop for a long time, but yesterday the first imago appeared (I think that the male, but did not specifically determine the sex). There he is : What Panesthiinae do you have?
    2 points
  33. I made this out of boredom. Hope you like them.
    2 points
  34. Haha I actually have two! One behavior witnessed two years ago and one witnessed today. 1. Dubia hunting live prey - One night in 2019 I put some mealworms into a set of about 20 mixed Dubia nymphs (Mostly large and medium sized nymphs). These nymphs had not encountered mealworms before. I noticed several hunting the mealworms and eating them live similar to behavior seen by orange head roaches. Really bizarre behavior as my Dubia colony never attack their tank mates like mealworms or dermestid beetles. Maybe because the nymphs didn't get enough protein? I was fresh as a roach hobbyist back then and didn't know what I do now. My roaches have balanced diets now but back then I probably didn't feed enough protein so they hunted foreign invertebrates to get it. They never turned to cannibalism thankfully. 2. Male Hisser Ramming Female - This was really odd. When I was feeding one of several hisser colonies I have I noticed a male charging and ramming multiple females like he would a rival male. This was odd as they NEVER from what I've seen charge females. All the males I've seen love their lady Hissers but this one wasn't having it. He rammed two that I saw and finally calmed down after several seconds. He then went to eat the fish pellets I gave them lol. Roaches are so interesting. So many intriguing behaviors!
    2 points
  35. My Simandoa all started to go out in adults, one pair has been in imago for several weeks already and the female is already plump. I really hope for a brood. The comrade had only two broods, despite the fact that in the first there are much less than thirty babies, and in the second there are only two. This is upsetting. But let's hope for the best In the photo, a pair of adults (male and female):
    2 points
  36. @Hisserdude wrote a great care sheet on Arenivaga spp. care. 🙂 Invertebrate Dude Caresheets: Arenivaga spp. (idcaresheets.blogspot.com)
    2 points
  37. Here's a care sheet that @Hisserdude wrote up on the species: Invertebrate Dude Caresheets: Pseudoglomeris magnifica (idcaresheets.blogspot.com)
    2 points
  38. Definitely the "Venom" morph of the Periplaneta americana. The jet-black body and pale white eyes have a great contrast. (Kyle has them if you want some for yourself)
    2 points
  39. One of them molted to L5, hooray! 😁 Some pics while it was still teneral: Now fully darkened:
    2 points
  40. A few days ago, several adults and about two dozen Elliptorhina coquereliana (Saussure, 1863) nymphs from Moscow will come to me. They were caught in the north of Madagascar - the natural range of this species. Earlier, I carried out identification using material from this culture (external morphology and preparation of the genitals). Based on this data, I can confidently say that the culture is Elliptorhina coquereliana. Photo of a adult male:
    2 points
  41. Agreed... but yet again it seems the autocorrect has struck me down! And embarrassed me on the internet... I have no idea what it autocorrected to US, but I originally said "for the roach hobby" (at least before my computer decided that it writes better than I do)
    2 points
  42. Hello, I have been railing about this for the last year....stop feeding poultry feed, medicated, unmedicated, organic, non-gmo....all of it. Poultry feeder manufacturers add a synthetic chemical known as DL Methionine which replicates the natural "methionine" found in the DNA of most if not all of God's creatures. Natural methionine is a needed amino acid protein....known as a "limiting" AAP because it limits the other AAPs found in nature's genetics. Imagine a wooden bucket made up of slats if you will, methionine is the shortest slat of the buck "limiting" its ability to hold water. If you increase the slat length, which is what the synthetic version DL Methionine does, you increase the ability of the bucket to hold more water. DLM is put into poultry feed to increase the proteins allowing for faster growing and meatier birds. The problem is DLM has been patented by the University of Florida as a pesticide. It targets pests with an alkaline gut physiology including mosquitos, termites, cockroaches, and other insects and larvae. It has been sprayed on stored grain for decades, which is why you will find it in tortoise food, guinea pig food, rabbit feed, the list is long. By law the producers of all these other feeds have to include the "ingredient list" of their suppliers, in their own ingredient lists. Having been sprayed on stored grain, grain which is used to make these other products, you will find DLM in these other products. I recently found it in my cat's food. There is the concept of "concentration" levels.....I make the assumption that products made with stored grain that has had DLM sprayed on it, has less concentrations of DLM than poultry feed which actually puts DLM into their product. Its a positive addition to market via advertising if you make poultry feed...not so good if you feed roach. (ahem...Mazuri...whom I've contacted and was surprised at their e-mailed reply) If you read the patent application, which was granted, concentration levels of .01 % were enough to immobilize and kill larvae affecting orange grove trees. These types of pesticides are known as "green" pesticides because they only target specific pests leaving the host healthy, last up to 3 generations in the genetics of the pests, making them a great pesticide and cheap. They greatly affect the 1st and 2nd instars, slow the growth of nymphs, and limit the reproduction of breeding females. Having bred and sold Dubia roaches for the last 10 years I can attest to another aspect, the females tend to be smaller...like not much bigger than a quarter. There are other consequences to raising methionine levels in the bucket....like raising other amino acid proteins like Histidine...which is responsible for creating "histamine"....we all know why we take anti-histamines right ??? I learned about DLM through an experience in early 2018 wherein I purchased 25,000 dubia females.....its quite the story but the vast majority were all small, had issues I have come to call "white wing" disease which is often pawned off as a molting issue, and "blistering" which I believe is caused by the increase in Histidine levels. (referenced in a text book about Zoology I believe it was) Within 6 months all of the purchased adult bugs were dead with not much reproduction at all, and the thousands of nymphs I had acquired began to mysteriously disappear. I would take 10K and place them in a tub all their own thinking that 30 days later I would have some smalls, 60 days later mediums, etc.....we vended 28 reptile shows in 2019 so a managed inventory was important. I thought...my God...I have forgotten how to grow Dubia roaches. I had done this experiment multiple times with the same mysterious loss of nymphs. If you consider our tubs aren't really more than an Easy Bake oven with a clean up crew...the lack of carcasses isn't all that mysterious. I talked with other breeders both large and small and was hearing about similar disappearances. Many if not all were feeding poultry feed if not alone then mixed with something else..... It wasn't until 6 months after the bugs died that I began to look at diet...the seller had told me when I purchased them he had fed nothing but poultry feed for years...sang its praises so much that I too started to feed my other dubia which numbered around 10K at the time, poultry feed too. They also died off prematurely but at the time I did not know with confidence their age to begin with.....that's how I got on the trail of DL Methionine. Today....our chow is completely pesticide free...you can eat it yourself...and I have done it in front of many people at shows as a testament to my claim. It contains barley, not the sprouted kind which can go rancid and not "pearled" barley that has had its bran power washed off of it basically. It also contains oat groats and wheat germ. We also dehydrate our own fruit as store bought dried fruit has had Sulphur or Sulphur Dioxide sprayed on it to retain its original color. Sulphur is the oldest pesticide known to man. I can tell you more about the needs of Dubia adults being different than growing adults and the benefits of a 1 to 8 protein to carbohydrate diet for preproduction. Thats a whole 'nother story.... https://patents.google.com/patent/US7181884 Mike
    2 points
  43. December 2020 Invertebrates Magazine Issue This issue we begin with a relative freshman to Pachnoda culture introduced to us by Hes of Sklipkan arthropod magazine fame (sklipkan means spider, or more specifically tarantula, in the Czech Republic). Next, we look at culturing a pretty, little, Nearctic tortoise beetle, 2020’s imports of camel-spiders out of Egypt, and a contender for the largest of the terrestrial isopods, Titan A. E. (After Entomology as crustaceans have taken over the bug hobby). We review three decades of experiences keeping the heaviest non-colonial invertebrates on earth, giant clams (the beautiful Tridacna and Hippopus) and finish up by solving the identification of Poe's gold-bug.
    2 points
  44. Quite excited to find a roach forum.:) Forums in general seem to be dying out :(, but there obviously still is good stuff to be found I've been keeping invertebrates of various kinds for over two decades now. My main interest are arachnids, but all arthropods are cool. My first roach was some South American species that I planned to feed to my tarantula, but it turned out to be so very cute, I simply couldn't! After that I've kept on and off a handful of different species. ATM I have only A. tessellata. I'm growing them as pets and also, if they start breeding well, to be dissected on the university animal morphology course. (Some may also end up to be fed to the spiders, but these are not exactly fast breeders, so I'll use them only if there is serious shortage of other feeder animals.) I find roaches fascinating. They are much more complex behaviourally than average people realize. I'd be superinterested to know if subsocial species of cockroaches, like Cryptocercus spp. are kept in captivity.
    2 points
  45. Therea are very interesting cockroaches, however, like all Corydiinae. T. bernhardti, T. olegranjeani live with me and relatively recently, I acquired T. regularis. So far, these are ten teenage nymphs. A very beautiful view, of course, but I like T. olegranjeani the most of them
    2 points
  46. I've read that fresh peanut butter will glow under a black light too! But I've yet to test it out. It seems that at least one Cubaris species will glow too: (Cubaris sp. ‘Blonde Rubber Ducky’ from dartknightexotics reddit page)
    2 points
  47. Some more pics I took before I shipped them out:
    2 points
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