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  1. Hi! This is my report on a finding of an unidentified Perisphaerus sp. from South China, more specifically Macau Special Administrative Region (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macau). 1st March 2020, during one of my night anting (looking for ant queens), i found two small isopod looking cockroaches, one I was able to capture, the other one, escaped into the the existing crevices. It was my first local caught cockroach, but back then i had no idea what it was, and so I posted in facebook and someone helped if it as Perisphaerus sp. In an attempt to id the species, i contacte
    3 points
  2. Well I've bred Myrmecophilus without keeping them with ants, so I'm hoping I can do the same with the Myrmecoblatta, we'll see. I'm throwing everything I can at them diet wise.
    2 points
  3. I suggest Lucihormetica subcincta or Lucihormetica verrucosa, they won't bother your allergies and can be kept more damp than the pantanal. They breed decently well if you have an established colony. Have you tried the other 3 Eublaberus species in captivity?
    1 point
  4. Very rare millipede from central Florida. Fortunately they were fairly easy to breed.
    1 point
  5. Try moving some or all to a new setup. My serranus is from maybe 2007 and they seem fine in the same cage. I have other roach colonies that have been in the same cage since 1995. My discoidalis I've had since 89 and the portentosa are an unmixed line from 72. Usually a change in care level, or differences in weather that affect indoor conditions are the problem. There is afungus that can wipe out a colony but I've only seen the fungus take out Corydia and Polyphaga and it still takes a few years to blow out a decent colony. Sadly it ends in 100% mortality eventually no matter what you do.
    1 point
  6. Hello! Nice to meet you all and thank you for accepting my membership. First of all, I never thought I would be keeping roaches for pets. But now I am. I am an ant keeper he saw himself one day having to order a small colony of red runners, to be able to feed my colonies with diverse sized roaches. Once that colony was exhausted, i ordered another one, and another one, until one day, I decided i should keep them constantly to save money and overcome the winter time where all my colonies would struggle for feeder insects. From those, I jumped by chance to domino roaches, a
    1 point
  7. Too fun! I'm new here, hallo! It's so nice that the hobby is a family activity for you.
    1 point
  8. I meant to do this a long time ago and totally forgot. I got started in late 2018 raising Dubia roaches for my son's lizard. I'd had reptiles, chelonians and such in the past but never inverts. The roaches turned out to be more interesting than reptiles to me, and my son started collecting bugs and getting interested in entomology. The combination of a move to a larger house with dedicated office/invert space and time at home due to the pandemic really accelerated my acquisition of new species. Tracking them down is really fun, but I enjoy raising them as well. It's quite rela
    1 point
  9. So what I wonder is if perhaps a diet that would be similar to what that species of aunt would eat might be helpful or even necessary? I would definitely research that ant , Because it would appear to me that there’s something about the ant colony that is necessary for rearing. Ants in general Feed on a lot of sugary items. They also have a period where they switch over to protein-based food. I wouldn’t even go as far as to collect some of those ants and kill them and feed them to the roaches. You never know there could be something in the gut of that ant that is necessary. Speculation of cour
    1 point
  10. Yeah I'm sure some extra enclosures would be good to have in case some species don't seem to get along. Hopefully you find some more info and others that have firsthand experience in keeping species together. Thank you, she had a good life, and was thankfully able to grace me with 1 litter of nymphs before she passed. I never paired her for almost 3 years before I found a male.
    1 point
  11. Hello, to help a bit with your question usually some roaches may get along better together than others. A concern with cohabitation of species is one species outcompeting the other for food/hiding places, etc. Some would thrive and the others would dwindle down in population, but since you don't intend to have them reproduce it may be possible to house multiple species together and have them coexist to an extent. There may be aggression between different species, but I have no evidence myself. They may stress each other out, but they don't seem to get lonely if not able to breed. I had a singl
    1 point
  12. Very nice looking. I hope they do good for you.
    1 point
  13. Now in the US hobby! 😁 Unfortunately these individuals were not mine to keep, but I should be getting some next year when their new owners breed them! In any case, I was able to snag a few pictures of some nymphs while they were briefly in my possession, enjoy! Closely related to Lanxoblatta, and similar to them in care.
    1 point
  14. I agree with Hisserdude, it really does depend on the species, as Blattodea is such a diverse order that what may be true for one species or genus may be fatal for another. Case in point: most Perisphaerinae as compared to most Panesthiinae. Thanks, Arthroverts
    1 point
  15. Roaches are tough as nails . . . But I pretty much agree . . . was just pointing it out ya know. 🙂
    1 point
  16. Yeah but mealworms are as tough as nails, I kinda doubt roaches would handle eating styrofoam just as well... I could be wrong though. Certainly if they're being used as feeders, as the OP intends, you wouldn't want styrofoam in their systems...
    1 point
  17. Hello. My first post in this forum. We are getting ready to set up a bioactive vivarium for our crested gecko. I had purchased some dwarf whites recently to put in the vivarium and I put the small container they came in which was a small deli cup of ABG (that is what the reptile store called it) and tossed it in a larger tub along with a gallon bag of the same ABG mix. This was maybe a month or so ago. I looked today and saw tons of these little ones crawling all over. I didn’t even notice them at first. The are about the size of a grain ofsand. I am assuming they are baby dwarf whites but jus
    1 point
  18. Yep, they look like adult predatory mites. That is about as big as they'll ever get.
    1 point
  19. 1. I don't know if it's true or not but I've heard the green layer under the skin of the potato is toxic. 2. I doubt you would have any problems but you might want a container full pf damp eco earth or sphagnum for them to lay oothecas on and for hydration. 3. I can't really answer this I keep mine on eco earth that i keep damp on 1 end. 4. You can leave them in the colony if there is enough moisture. If there's not enough moisture they'll be eaten so then you'll have to move them. 5. just keep an eye on them eventually you may need to split your colony or cull some if it
    1 point
  20. Arenivaga bolliana, our largest native sand roach. Nice find! Adult females are wingless, adult males have wings.
    1 point
  21. Hello everybody, I found a few members of this species under some logs in San Antonio, TX. They don’t look native to me. There were Surinam roaches in the same location as well. Help with identification would be much appreciated! Sorry I was not able to find any adults.
    1 point
  22. Got the opportunity to draw some of my roaches for a school assignment These are just sketches, but I would love to do some nicely rendered art of them soon. I would love to see more art of bugs while I'm here! If any of y'all wanna share your art here, please do
    1 point
  23. Awesome drawings! (And thanks for reporting the spam post. I deleted it.)
    1 point
  24. Well, not for "pet" purposes, but for "education" it certainly is possible ;). Thanks, Arthroverts
    1 point
  25. Hopefully more people have success so they become as common as Gyna lurida!
    1 point
  26. Thank you Arthroverts!! I also been reading your blog! regards!
    1 point
  27. Oh thank you, glad you find my blog useful! 😁 Thanks for making this post, always nice to see new Perisphaerus in culture! Hope we see more species in culture here in the US one day!
    1 point
  28. Welcome Martin, glad to have you join us! Thanks, Arthroverts
    1 point
  29. Dear Hisserdude, What an absolutely pleasure it is to have your welcome! I have read your blog many times :D Since you showed your interested on the Perisphaerus I am keeping, i decided to do a post about them. Hope you enjoy! and thank you for your hard work!! it helps a lot, specially for newcomers like me! Regards, Martin
    1 point
  30. Welcome to the forum Martin, nice collection you have there! 😁 I'm particularly interested in the Perisphaerus, any pictures of those? The Perisphaerinae is my favorite cockroach subfamily, and I always love seeing new species entering culture! Interested to see what cool new species you're able to catch where you live and travel!
    1 point
  31. Yeah, at a pet store they're probably selling hybrids.
    1 point
  32. I got them at a local petstore i did some more research and that was the conclusion i came too. thank you!
    1 point
  33. Hard to tell from these pics, but all things considered they're hybrid portentosa. Where'd you get them?
    1 point
  34. Oh my... this is my first time keeping Therea and today I checked their enclosure and found all of this! And I’m still finding more!!! Amazing little creatures.
    1 point
  35. Congratulations! 😁 They are quite a prolific species, there's more where those came from!
    1 point
  36. @Hisserdude Yeah - eventually I do want to find a nice balance to house roaches with some other inverts, but I think it'll need to be bigger than the 5g. Now I just need to decide where I am gonna put them. I lost 2/3 of my Halloween hissers (one escaped, the other died suddenly), so I think I'm going to move my remaining female into a smaller enclosure and put these guys in her 19g bin. But she might be gravid and the smaller container I have has fairly big ventilation holes so I'm worried if she does pop out some babies they'll escape lol
    1 point
  37. Yeah I'd definitely keep them separate, the roaches would probably crowd the tank too much for the isopods and pedes, and also prefer warmer temps for breeding than most millipedes like.
    1 point
  38. @Shinylarvitar97 @Hisserdude Thank you for responding! I'll definitely take you up on that offer, Shinylarvitar, if I think of any more questions! The breeder said that he keeps these guys in low ventilation with a lot of moisture - I was initially actually going to put these guys in with my millipedes / isopods, but decided not to (it felt like it would be too crowded with the roaches, and I was worried they'd go after baby/molting isopods/pedes).
    1 point
  39. I kept mine in a gallon container, with limited ventilation and high humidity, and they bred like pests... 😂 Very tolerant of a wide variety of conditions apparently.
    1 point
  40. Hi, with African bullet roaches I tend to keep mine on 1" of dry coconut fiber substrate with 1/3-1/4 of the enclosure moist and some moss in a corner or 2. They enjoy mainly hiding under cork pieces or the leaf litter i provide for them. They seem to be fairly tolerant to drying out, but their ootheca seem to need a bit of moisture to hatch of course. Which is why I mist them weekly. This allows them to drink a bit and for the ootheca to hatch well. For heat I have kept them from room temp and up in the mid 80's. They seem to do fine at cooler temps, but they are most productive at aroun
    1 point
  41. Thank u very much! But i have last question, i didnt write it in the original post, How about pseudoglomeris tarsalis? Is it the same as Pseudoglomeris magnifica?
    1 point
  42. Seeing as my username on all the invertebrate forums is "Hisserdude", and it's an issue I'm passionate about, I thought I'd create a reference of what the PURE hobby Gromphadorhini are supposed to look like, since we are facing a mislabeling epidemic that threatens to inadvertently eradicate pure hisser stocks from the hobby over time, making lines less and less unique and different from each other. All coloration norms mentioned here are for adults, unless otherwise specified. Hisser nymphs of even pure stock can vary wildly in coloration, and thu
    1 point
  43. I collected them at Big Pine Key, FL under limestones. Apparently they are found throughout the Keys. I raised mine on fish flakes, squash, apple, and dog food.
    1 point
  44. My Panesthia angustipennis angustipennis males are very noisy! Once in a while one of them comes to the surface and starts making noise by hammerings with its abdomen on a piece of wood. The wood and the enclosure kind of resonates and enhances the noise. I manages to make an audio recording with my audio recorder (see attachement). There is a lot of bass to hear (it's a decent recorder), and it gives a good idea what I have to endure here I', pretty sure this is a way to attract females. My question: has anyone observed a similar thing? 20200308_Panesthia angustipe
    1 point
  45. I have done a few cockroach learning/behavior studies, but nothing published yet, so nothing I can share at the moment. A fair bit of my published work is with bees, you can see here: http://cavarnon.com/publications If it has a link, its open access, if not, then it is something I'm not actually allowed to share freely. Bees are a little higher maintenance, and I don't like getting stung in the face, so I'm really shifting my work toward cockroaches this year. It'll probably be at least a year before I have something sharable, but of course I'll share everything with the group here. In t
    1 point
  46. I have 10 females and 1 male hissing cockroaches. I have this one cockroach (female) that always stays as close as possible to the light, reacts weird to the touch with a nervous fast movement almost like shaking as it walks. I noticed she’s missing part of one of her mid legs and she has a lot of trouble climbing objects, for that reason I find her laying on her back most of the time not being able to turn back to her feet. Is there a chance she could be sick? Or else? 62252309353__4D59AC99-4ED3-4347-842E-2354970550D8.MOV
    0 points
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