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  1. Hey guys, it's been a long time since I've posted anything (or have been involved in the invert hobby for that matter). Long story short I'm back into it as of a few months ago but that info will be for another post. After posting the above photo of my bug tubs on Facebook the other day, I had some people want to see how I made them. Because I had more to make, I figured I'd photograph the whole process and post it here. Of course, there's a million ways to make practical and effective colony enclosures. This is simply what I do for mine. They work fantastic for just about all species (includi
    10 points
  2. EDIT, Nov 2019: In light of new information, this species is NOT Hormetica apolinari, but Hormetica strumosa. A little less-showy than their relatives, Lucihormetica, these are a new addition to the hobby. What they lack in glowspots they make up for in size, robustness, the presence of prominent horns in males, and behavior. They are also quite prolific. Hands down one of the most rewarding species to keep.
    9 points
  3. Hello there friends, I've started breeding these magnificent species. Paratropes phalerata is a diurnal cockroach that lives on live plants. In some literature has been cited as an important pollinator :-) I've been trying several ways to keep them... At the beginning I've tried to emulate an habitat with the same plants I usually find them on. But it's been a little tricky and not necessarily better in captive breeding. So at this moment I'm keeping most of the groups I have in small boxes, with good ventilation and moist substrate, and barks for them to perch on, just to keep
    9 points
  4. Hello friends! :-) Spoiler: Yes, I did it, but... Some months ago I've start my first topic here in the forum, asking for information about care and breeding of the genus Megaloblatta, to find that as it seems, there's not any available information at the moment, and... that every known attempt of breeding this genus has failed, specifically at the point of incubating their oothecae. First topic here: Now the news... As you can see in the other thread, I've started with 4 nymphs, but one died in my process to find their right food. Impressively the other 3 survived my clu
    7 points
  5. A lot of people have been asking me about the species of Panchlora in culture, and why I price the white roaches differently than the others. More specifically, people wanted to know about their size difference. I took a photo to show you the sizes of Panchlora "white" and P. "speckled", compared to P. nivea. Please note that my P. nivea come from a wild population, so they might not be P. nivea at all, but their size is identical to P. nivea that is in culture. These are all unmated females. P. "speckled" is slightly bigger than P. nivea, and Panchlora "white" is even bigger. You can also
    7 points
  6. Cockroaches are white following each molt and it can take a few hours for normal coloration to return.
    7 points
  7. Got a pair of this species from Roachcrossing the other day, they are the largest Lucihormetica in the hobby, and are quite beautiful! Hopefully they'll breed for me! Male Female My male L.grossei and subcincta together for a size comparison, as you can see, grossei is quite a bit bigger!
    6 points
  8. I know this isn't super relevant as a subject to discuss, but I'm just so excited! My library decided to accept my purchase request for For the Love of Cockroaches by Orin McMonigle, and now they have it! I have never hit "Place Hold" so quickly in my life! I can't wait to learn all about roaches and finally decide on a species for my next colony!
    6 points
  9. It's time to welcome another new species into the hobby - Lanxoblatta rudis! This beautiful bark roach is native to South America. They are flat, and I do mean *flat*, because they spend most of their time on tree bark, feeding on moss and fungi. Adults are dark maroon in color and bullet-shaped (photo is of a female, males look the same just flatter). But the nymphs... oh, the nymphs! They bring me much joy. They have body extensions that give them a disk shape. This is an adaptation against ants - nymphs will hunker down and merge with the bark when provoked. I will post more photos belo
    6 points
  10. A photo to give some sense of scale. As you can see they are pretty massive. I'm a guy in his mid-30's, so my hand isn't exactly small. You can see a female in the back.
    6 points
  11. Another point of view on a male:
    6 points
  12. Got the opportunity to draw some of my roaches for a school assignment These are just sketches, but I would love to do some nicely rendered art of them soon. I would love to see more art of bugs while I'm here! If any of y'all wanna share your art here, please do
    5 points
  13. Seeing as my username on all the invertebrate forums is "Hisserdude", and it's an issue I'm passionate about, I thought I'd create a reference of what the PURE hobby Gromphadorhini are supposed to look like, since we are facing a mislabeling epidemic that threatens to inadvertently eradicate pure hisser stocks from the hobby over time, making lines less and less unique and different from each other. All coloration norms mentioned here are for adults, unless otherwise specified. Hisser nymphs of even pure stock can vary wildly in coloration, and thu
    5 points
  14. I managed to make some photographs of my new roaches: Corydidarum magnifica. The nymphs are still quite small (8mm / 0.31inch) and I took the photographs through the glass of their tank, so the quality isn't optimal.
    5 points
  15. Hey guys, it's been a little while since I posted here, I have some somber news to share. I have been dealing with some severe anxiety and depression issues for the past few months, and I kinda broke down a couple weeks ago. This hobby has unfortunately been causing me a lot more stress than happiness lately, possibly because I have too many species. It's also taken up almost all of my available time, and has prevented me from participating in any of my other hobbies or spending quality time with my family. So, after some soul-searching, I have decided to all but leave the hobby.
    5 points
  16. After collecting cockroach activity in my collection for more than a year now, I decided to make some graphs. Each graph is made up of 505056 datapoints (measurement every 10 seconds for 2 months). X-axis: hour of the day Y-Axis: Activity level and light level in the enclosure. Among the most interesting ones are the Therea bernhardti graphs. There you can see how the nymphs are active during the night, in contrast to the day-active adults.
    5 points
  17. I'm very happy at the moment as I got 10 Schizopilia fissicollis nymphs today from Nicolas Rousseaux! They are beautiful (in my opinion at least)
    5 points
  18. Received 6 of these in a trade with Alan Grosse, (who's got an awesome new website), man are they beautiful! Hopefully they'll do well for me, I know they aren't the easiest of the Spanish isopods for sure!
    5 points
  19. Got a sexed pair of nymphs and a pair of adults from @wizentrop, this may be one of the most unique roach species in my collection, hopefully they will breed for me! Nymph: Adult male: So happy to have this species in my collection, they are just so cool looking!!!
    5 points
  20. Looks like I need to send some Periplaneta to your house on the next shipment. lol
    5 points
  21. Hello there friends! I'll be adding pictures of some of my weird breeding... Let's start by introduce this amazing species Phortioeca phoraspoides
    5 points
  22. Hey friends, I've been breeding these since some time ago... Is the first Periplaneta species I've ever kept and I'm in love with them :-) The overpopulation in my colony works pretty well as occasional feeders... Ñom! She likes potatoes
    5 points
  23. Neat whip spider from TX. I only had one for a while, but I managed to collect 10 on a trip this week!
    5 points
  24. A group of small nymphs
    5 points
  25. I'll do a roach room tour eventually. Hang in there
    5 points
  26. I may actually have some larvae available for sale soon, my colony is doing pretty good and is producing a decent amount of offspring. Will definitely let you know when I have some available!
    5 points
  27. Posted by cj on 12/25/2006, 5:41 am 71.38.75.227 We have all white roaches taking up residency in our house. now i don't know much about roaches other than i can't kill them because i find them to be quite cute ( and i truly believe that roaches are psychic) anyway i was just wondering what the white ones were. and also there are the other ones here that look like crickets/roaches...i call them croaches. the lady that lives upstairs has a tree frog..she feeds it crickets and roaches and i think they interbread ( i know interbreading between species is possible, infact my grandma had a cat
    5 points
  28. Posted by keith on 12/30/2006, 2:16 pm, in reply to "White Roaches?" 68.241.207.246 i think they are just a albino of the common german cockroach have seen a few mixed in with the reg. ones
    5 points
  29. Just received 6 nymphs in the mail today from @wizentrop, they are so neat looking, and bigger than I thought they would be! Let's hope they'll do well for me! Here are some pictures of a nymph: So cute right!?
    4 points
  30. Thanks. My plan was for this setup to emulate a tree fall in a tropical forest with rotting wood habitat and some of the plants you would find in that kind of situation. This kind of habitat is always a good place to find insects and other invertebrates as well. I placed a particular emphasis on vining plants because many of these are characteristic of forest openings. There are also a lot of botanically-interesting vines to collect and grow. Here is a quick list with most of the plants in there... Aristolochia macroura Banisteriopsis caapi Cissus antarctica Ficus sagit
    4 points
  31. I just read on http://www.roachcrossing.com/major-life-updates-unanswered-e-mails-facebook-reboot-future/, that Kyle is getting things back in order. That's good news, especially for Kyle himself! I didn't know what had happened last year, but knowing know after reading his message, it has been quite a lot. Well, I wish Kyle all the best (and perhaps we should not swarm him with roach orders )! Kyle: if you happen to read this: Take you time, and I wish you all the best!
    4 points
  32. This is great news and definitely a step in the right direction. I share your notion that Megaloblatta's oothecae are tough like bricks and must go through some kind of process in order to hatch. What was really interesting for me to read were the observations on diet preferences between adults and nymph. This means that they possibly occupy different habitats in the wild. Maybe the nymphs have a specialized diet, or are associated with other insects (termites, fulgorids). Another option is that they stay close to the mother and she directly feeds them or prepares processed food for them. I
    4 points
  33. Let's see some Periplaneta! I love roachy roaches. Post your pics along with these! Periplaneta fuligonosa, the only ones that don't have adults yet. Periplaneta americana (White eye morph) Periplaneta americana (regular morph CB) Periplaneta americana (regular morph WC) Periplaneta brunnea Periplaneta australasiae Apparently I have a mite issue. Bleh.
    4 points
  34. Same adult roach with cross polarization filters (removes all reflection):
    4 points
  35. Hey Everyone, Indeed, the first Schizopilia were collected in Mitaraka, French Guiana. I've been in touch with the Museum since 2016, and contributed to their research by giving a large amount of individuals from diferent species. Later, the contacted me about this species. The F1 generation was close to be adults but there were no research planned for them, so they were not planning to keep them and asked me if I wanted to receive them. The only thing I've seen about them was a black and white illustration without scale... You can imagine how crazy I was when I saw that pro
    4 points
  36. A time lapse movies of their nightly activity. If you look careful, you can see one roach molting into adulthood and one nymph getting into the next instar.
    4 points
  37. One can also see the translucent area in the pronotum above their head. I assume this helps them to see light - dark while keeping their head under it.
    4 points
  38. Lo and behold, one of the nymphs molted into adult stage today! Not yet their final color...
    4 points
  39. This particular variety can be found in Ocala National Forest, FL
    4 points
  40. Collected by @Cariblatta lutea from Lake Placid, FL!
    4 points
  41. The next generation is doing quite well. This is only a small fraction of the new babies.
    4 points
  42. I made a trade with @CodeWilster for a group of these beauties, I received several nymphs and a few adults too, hopefully they'll breed well for me! Here are some pictures of an adult:
    4 points
  43. A cute nymph, just to show you how flat they are.
    4 points
  44. A closer look on a Lanxoblatta rudis nymph
    4 points
  45. OMG I found babies in the enclosure today!!! So happy right now!
    4 points
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