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  1. As some of you may know, my username on all the invertebrate forums is "Hisserdude", so true to form I thought I'd create a reference of what the PURE hobby Gromphadorhini are supposed to look like, since we are facing a mislabeling epidemic that threatens to inadvertently eradicate pure hisser stocks from the hobby over time, making lines less and less unique and different from each other. All coloration norms mentioned here are for adults, unless otherwise specified. Hisser nymphs of even pure stock can vary wildly in coloration, and thus their coloration usually
    5 points
  2. Hi! This is my report on a finding of an unidentified Perisphaerus sp. from South China, more specifically Macau Special Administrative Region (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macau). 1st March 2020, during one of my night anting (looking for ant queens), i found two small isopod looking cockroaches, one I was able to capture, the other one, escaped into the the existing crevices. It was my first local caught cockroach, but back then i had no idea what it was, and so I posted in facebook and someone helped if it as Perisphaerus sp. In an attempt to id the species, i contacte
    4 points
  3. Thanks. My plan was for this setup to emulate a tree fall in a tropical forest with rotting wood habitat and some of the plants you would find in that kind of situation. This kind of habitat is always a good place to find insects and other invertebrates as well. I placed a particular emphasis on vining plants because many of these are characteristic of forest openings. There are also a lot of botanically-interesting vines to collect and grow. Here is a quick list with most of the plants in there... Aristolochia macroura Banisteriopsis caapi Cissus antarctica Ficus sagit
    4 points
  4. Earlier this week, I was presented with 7 middle aged nymphs Therea nuptialis (Gerstaecker, 1861). This species is very rare in culture, and for me, collecting Corydiinae, this is a very desirable acquisition. I hope that after the nymphs enter the imago, I will be able to get a sufficient number of ootheca and consolidate the species in my culture.
    3 points
  5. I do think any Therea species would look awesome in there, willing you have many adults in there at once, just unfortunate they don't live long once mature, which may leave the enclosure looking empty for a while. Also maybe some Lucihormetica or Hormetica like you said would be nice. I find my adult Lucihormetica verrucosa like to hang out on the surface on top of bark and such, but I do have a good amount of adults in one enclosure, and it might just be they are a bit crowded. Other than that maybe some large Blaberus species like Blaberus giganteus or even Archimandrita species
    3 points
  6. You may notice some changes. The forum's software has been updated.
    3 points
  7. Relatively easy species to breed and care for.
    3 points
  8. These were collected from Tampa, FL. They have similar color to Ocala strain, but adult females develop yellow spots on the margin of their abdomen.
    3 points
  9. Happy Earth Day!!! 🌎 Hopefully the earth soars when we are set free just like this Crane Fly did. 😁 ft. Noah Campos New Video
    3 points
  10. Last new colony of the year 2020 has arrived - Diploptera puntacta Nymph Photos Quite excited for this species. I really love when roaches mimic other insects! First things I have noticed: 1 - the musky smell inside the box. Not sure if the smell is from the release of any defensive chemicals from the shaking of the box during transportation or if this is their "natural" smell. 2 - their speed and climbing of walls... bloody hell... i wasn't expecting that for small nymphs. They are quite bold. Normally other nymphs will quickly run under the leaves or substrate to hi
    2 points
  11. Technically they did. people get around it by saying things like: "I have such-and-such. PM me" As long as there isn't a price in the post or the words selling or buying, they can get away with it.
    2 points
  12. Just to inform that Invertebrate Dude has helped tremendously to get an ID on these roaches. Thank you! Based on the location, male to female size similarities, female ventral abdomen with short yellow hairs, also matching the description from the Perisphaerinae Revision Paper, he pointed out that he thought it is Perisphaerus punctatus. Now onto to get these established in the hobby. My colony is doing very well, and now I need to think about scaling up the enclosure. I like this setup a lot, its very practical and functions very well but it
    2 points
  13. Hello everyone, FlamingSwampert here! I just wanted to introduce myself. You may/may not know me from the Arachnoboards forum, or from many other places. I am getting into the roach hobby, so I decided to join this forum! I plan on getting many more species once it becomes warmer, but currently I only have Dubia Roaches. Other than roaches, I have a Painted Agama named Rocky, and a plethora of isopods, beetles, millipedes, and fish. I have also kept stag beetles and mantises, but all of my individuals sadly died. I love all roaches (and animals), but my favorite spec
    2 points
  14. December 2020 Invertebrates Magazine Issue This issue we begin with a relative freshman to Pachnoda culture introduced to us by Hes of Sklipkan arthropod magazine fame (sklipkan means spider, or more specifically tarantula, in the Czech Republic). Next, we look at culturing a pretty, little, Nearctic tortoise beetle, 2020’s imports of camel-spiders out of Egypt, and a contender for the largest of the terrestrial isopods, Titan A. E. (After Entomology as crustaceans have taken over the bug hobby). We review three decades of experiences keeping the heaviest non-colonial invertebrates on ear
    2 points
  15. It's been close to a decade since I've been on here. My life took a bit of a downturn and I got out of the hobby for a while. I've spent the last couple years getting back on my feet and I finally have reached the point where I could get back into the hobby. I was browsing around arachnoboards (after getting back into my old account) and found a reference to this forum and was able to resurrect my account. Currently keeping 5 tarantulas, hissing roaches, dubias, and a trio of N. Gordanus millipedes. Along with a ball python and 2 cats.
    2 points
  16. Now in the US hobby! 😁 Unfortunately these individuals were not mine to keep, but I should be getting some next year when their new owners breed them! In any case, I was able to snag a few pictures of some nymphs while they were briefly in my possession, enjoy! Closely related to Lanxoblatta, and similar to them in care.
    2 points
  17. Therea are very interesting cockroaches, however, like all Corydiinae. T. bernhardti, T. olegranjeani live with me and relatively recently, I acquired T. regularis. So far, these are ten teenage nymphs. A very beautiful view, of course, but I like T. olegranjeani the most of them
    2 points
  18. Because of the cold weather front that has hit Macau recently, the temperature drop has made all my roach bins halt their external activity. The room is now at 20C during daytime and dropping at night to 15C. Most of the roaches are now underground or hiding. The Yamato Nymphs are congregating in two separate groups under some leaves. You can take a quick peek as I expose them to the light, on the link down below. Video Lovely yellow coloration don't you think?
    2 points
  19. I ended up with babies
    2 points
  20. So my partner and I were cleaning their tank for their Madagascar hissing cockroaches and we came across this girl. Put her aside since she looks different from any of the others and waited a night to see if it was just because of molting. But nope, she's retained this light caramel colour. My partner dubbed her "Candy Apple" and we've decided to select our prettiest male and try to breed to see if there is any chance it's genetic. Thought I'd share here!
    2 points
  21. I meant to do this a long time ago and totally forgot. I got started in late 2018 raising Dubia roaches for my son's lizard. I'd had reptiles, chelonians and such in the past but never inverts. The roaches turned out to be more interesting than reptiles to me, and my son started collecting bugs and getting interested in entomology. The combination of a move to a larger house with dedicated office/invert space and time at home due to the pandemic really accelerated my acquisition of new species. Tracking them down is really fun, but I enjoy raising them as well. It's quite rela
    2 points
  22. I don't think I've shared this specimen here before.
    2 points
  23. Well I've bred Myrmecophilus without keeping them with ants, so I'm hoping I can do the same with the Myrmecoblatta, we'll see. I'm throwing everything I can at them diet wise.
    2 points
  24. Hello! Nice to meet you all and thank you for accepting my membership. First of all, I never thought I would be keeping roaches for pets. But now I am. I am an ant keeper he saw himself one day having to order a small colony of red runners, to be able to feed my colonies with diverse sized roaches. Once that colony was exhausted, i ordered another one, and another one, until one day, I decided i should keep them constantly to save money and overcome the winter time where all my colonies would struggle for feeder insects. From those, I jumped by chance to domino roaches, a
    2 points
  25. Got the opportunity to draw some of my roaches for a school assignment These are just sketches, but I would love to do some nicely rendered art of them soon. I would love to see more art of bugs while I'm here! If any of y'all wanna share your art here, please do
    2 points
  26. I was lucky enough to see hundreds of these on a hike. Interestingly, only 6 of the ones I saw were females.
    2 points
  27. 2 points
  28. Hello everyone, Just wanted to check in. Its been awhile since I've been on here. Lots of changes happened. I moved to new state, new career, etc. I'm slowly starting to get my life around once again. Hopefully I can start breeding roaches once more. I miss having my roach colonies that I had to rehome due to relocating. Hope all is well with everyone. Have a good Day.
    2 points
  29. I collected them at Big Pine Key, FL under limestones. Apparently they are found throughout the Keys. I raised mine on fish flakes, squash, apple, and dog food.
    2 points
  30. Super interesting and helpful. Also, the topic is kind of fascinating. I wonder what we will know about hissers in another 20 years. Our understanding of the various species may be very different.
    2 points
  31. All I can say is wow. This is amazing information for everyone out there. Thank you for taking the time to post this. Amazing work!
    2 points
  32. You could split the colonies by gender like I do, though be aware that the larger males will fight and can actually injure each other so you may need to further separate out some males. Otherwise, I would follow @hisserdude's advice.
    2 points
  33. My Polyphaga always did this, (a lot of my burrowing roaches did actually), problem is, even if you got a deep substrate, they do like digging to the absolute bottom, so there will always be some down there scratching away... Moving the container to a place where you can't hear them as much would be your best bet, I personally just got used to the scratching.
    2 points
  34. Eleodes obscura (adult female): Eleodes nigrina (adult female):
    2 points
  35. Aww man . . . what a ridiculous oversight! I've been keeping bugs for over 20 years . . . just goes to show that even us 'old timers' can make a super rookie mistake! Thank you for pointing that out . . . yes, I've been meaning to type Porcellio hoffmannseggi this whole time . . . Guess that brings me back to my original question . . . Any good care info or links for Porcellio hoffmannseggi?
    2 points
  36. Of course almost every new isopod is the "biggest" but this is the longest species according to species literature (documented at 3.2 cm body length). The male has long uropods and tends to be longer than the female.
    2 points
  37. I can provide a +1 for gasket tubs; they're perfect for these.
    2 points
  38. Sometimes the females look like they have glow organs but these are markings, not organs. A male without them is highly improbable but like big foot it can only be proven by its evidence.
    2 points
  39. I like the big Porcellio the most. Many of the Cubaris are nice/neat but I don't understand how little differences in color on relatively small pills that don't look horribly different from Armadillidium (which are bigger and come in brighter colors) are selling for $40-50 for one tiny specimen. Good thing about Cubaris is so far they seem to all be very easy so in a few years it's hard do believe they all won't be down to $10 a dozen.
    2 points
  40. He was very quick to reply with me, although I am hearing overall that is not the case. A friend told me that you have to bug him a bit to get a response sometimes. A frustrating situation to be sure. He should hire @Hisserdude or someone to help answer emails ;). Thanks, Arthroverts
    2 points
  41. If i keep food in there for all, will they not bother one another? I'm considering removing the roaches 1 by 1 and separating the isopods
    2 points
  42. Im not too experienced with Panchlora, but i do know that Powdery orange isopods are one of the fastest breeding isopods, so down the line the isopods may try to outcompete the roaches for food, or if the isopods are hungry enough, *may* try to eat a molting roach, as they're more protein hungry than roaches are in my experience, however they would rather eat a dead non-moving roach than a live one. If you have plenty of leaf litter in their enclosure, it shouldn't be too big of a problem.
    2 points
  43. I do have an update: species confirmed. I think. I know I have this one in there, alive and kicking. I haven't seen any of the others in awhile, though. This one was actually found loose! I think it escaped early on, before I had them in proper containment, and it seems to have been pretty happy to grow and develop outside the enclosure. Probably in my houseplants. I did NOT sex it while I had it out, since I know these have a stink defense and I didn't want to risk it doing that. I'm actually going to be making a post elsewhere of rehoming these. I have some chronic fat
    2 points
  44. My Panesthia angustipennis angustipennis males are very noisy! Once in a while one of them comes to the surface and starts making noise by hammerings with its abdomen on a piece of wood. The wood and the enclosure kind of resonates and enhances the noise. I manages to make an audio recording with my audio recorder (see attachement). There is a lot of bass to hear (it's a decent recorder), and it gives a good idea what I have to endure here I', pretty sure this is a way to attract females. My question: has anyone observed a similar thing? 20200308_Panesthia angustipe
    2 points
  45. obviously, this is a joke...hopefully im not the only dork who thinks its funny lol. reminded me of catdog, instead its....roachroach?
    2 points
  46. Well I don’t think it’s about creating something more toxic. They usually look for another family of chemicals or a new mode of action. The problem is the companies selling over the counter. The problem is untrained individuals use chemical incorrectly and lead to the resistance. It’s all about following the label and knowing where and what to do with it. In my own observations I have found that the tiniest amount of pesticide placed in a perfect spot can crash the population. Most people have a more is better approach and make it worse. I have a saying. You can take a machine gun squirrel hun
    2 points
  47. American Cockroach Society Wear I'm surprised this still works, it hasn't been updated in nine years.
    2 points
  48. Hello! I want to show you some of my more uncommon [here in Europe] roach species. My foto size reduction is slightly better than in my last topic and I will further try to improve this. Melanozosteria nitida BRUNNER VON WATTENWYL 1865 (from Khai Sok in Thailand) Only under lights more redish than black, but look at the defensive secretion on their last abdominal segments. They are incredible fast runners. Thorax porcellana SAUSSURE 1862 (from India and Sri Lanka) Beautyful species from the Epilamprinae subfamily. Most fascinating ar
    2 points
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