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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/19/2020 in Posts

  1. Roachforum is the oldest of the existing invertebrate forums. Thanks to every member and especially Peter of BIC for keeping it alive. The costs and competing groups that come and go could easily have fizzled it out without such support.
    7 points
  2. Got the opportunity to draw some of my roaches for a school assignment These are just sketches, but I would love to do some nicely rendered art of them soon. I would love to see more art of bugs while I'm here! If any of y'all wanna share your art here, please do
    5 points
  3. Now in culture there are adults of both sexes. Some females already have ooteca. I hope for a rich brood Male on the photo:
    5 points
  4. No, I just never bothered trying to get the UCR strain. It's hard enough trying to keep every bug on earth without trying to keep every strain.
    4 points
  5. Congrats on getting this beautiful species! Though Orin and Peter are the definitive experts on them in the hobby, I've been keeping them for about 7 months now, with a fair amount of success. The starting culture I work with is quite large due to its long term purpose, but I know of people who have successfully been able to culture large amounts out of groups as small as six. You'll get anywhere from 15-30 babies out of one successful pairing, though god knows it takes a while. In most cases adulthood takes about 8 months to reach, and gestation ranges 3-5. I have been told however, that these periods can be shortened if greater heat is provided, though I have not tried this myself. I keep my two groups in highly ventilated bins on a few inches of coconut husk topped by leaf litter, with slightly moist sphagnum in one corner to increase humidity. I provide both cork bark and egg cartons which serve (along with a high protein diet) to decrease antennae and wing biting. I will lightly mist the substrate once daily, and provide varied produce and protein sources, along with a consistent container of calcium fortified cricket gel. This setup has allowed me to see significant growth in my group of nymphs, and I have observed continued breeding in the large mixed colony I was able to purchase last month. Hopefully I will be seeing more babies soon! Oh, and I'm sure you've already figured this out, but your enclosure need to be crazy secure. Crazy secure. I hope this is a helpful report of my experience with this species, I want to end it by thanking the people from whom much of this care information came. A huge thank you to @Peter Clausen@Allpet Roaches@pannaking22@Hisserdude and the many, many others both on and off this forum who have contributed towards my work with this species. I wouldn't be able to work with these incredible roaches if these folks hadn't. Thank you all!
    4 points
  6. I don't think Flamingswampert was offended but then I also don't know what his/her short, non-descript message meant. I think it meant ignore the chatter but it could mean feathers are lighter than stones. I don't remember anyone questioning the validity of the extinct designation before but of course we still can't prove big dinosaurs are extinct with 100% certainty. I recall a movie suggesting a lost world full of them is in the hollow earth beneath an artificial sun. There maybe some Simandoa there too.
    4 points
  7. First time ever available in electronic format. Available through Coachwhip Books https://coachwhip.com/collections/invertebrate-pets/products/invertebrates-magazine-2001-2002 there are dozens of cockroach articles and features.
    4 points
  8. All relative sizes should be correct as I tried to maintain same reproduction ratio while taking the photos. If any mistake exist, should be really minor.
    3 points
  9. In early May, I received material from Uzbekistan, collected in three locations: a clay desert near the city of Termez (extreme south), from the surrounding sandy massifs of the year of Bukhara and from the sandy desert of the Nurata nature reserve. Naturally, all the material came unnamed. I, the person involved in this group, have previously identified the material in my laboratory. As a result: an adult female from the vicinity of the city of Termez turned out to be Polyphaga saussurei; three females from the sands of Bukhara - Polyphaga indica vitripennis (why exactly ssp. vitripennis - because the nominative subspecies does not occur on the territory of the former USSR); two subadult females and a subadult male from the Nurata Nature Reserve are also P. indica vitripennis. The adult females from the first two locations were unambiguously fertilized in nature and began to lay ootheca on the way. Females from the Nurata Nature Reserve, and later the male, molted into adults. And now, just yesterday, I discovered that both of them immediately begin to form ooteca. We will conduct laboratory observations of this material. I think that with such a high productivity, there is a chance to introduce this material into laboratory culture. Вот самец P. indica vitripennis:
    3 points
  10. Two females with ootheca. Finally, I got the first results! The male did a good job!
    3 points
  11. Found about a dozen babies in the enclosure the other day, after a gestation period of approximately 6 months. I've officially bred all three Panesthiinae species in my collection, yay!
    3 points
  12. One of the females of Elliptorhina davidi gave birth to about two dozen nymphs. This is very wonderful, but of course there are well-founded fears for them, as well as for the whole group as a whole. We can only wait and hope My conditions are standard for all Gromphadorhini: humidity is minimal, like in the desert, a wick drinker is installed, the substrate is wheat bran, shelters are egg trays, food is apples, carrots and gammarus. In such conditions, I reproduce well - Aeluropoda insignis, Elliptorhina chopardi, E. cf. coquereliana, E. javanica, E. laevigata, Gromphadorhina oblongonota, G. portentosa, G. portentosa ‘Black’, Gromphadorhina sp., Princisia vanwaerebeki, P. vanwaerebeki ‘Big’, P. vanwaerebeki ‘Black & White’.
    3 points
  13. Finally gave birth! About (or more) 20 nymphs. Another female also had mating, now we are waiting for her to give birth Everyone is not visible in the photo, since they are smartly hiding:
    3 points
  14. Earlier this week, I was presented with 7 middle aged nymphs Therea nuptialis (Gerstaecker, 1861). This species is very rare in culture, and for me, collecting Corydiinae, this is a very desirable acquisition. I hope that after the nymphs enter the imago, I will be able to get a sufficient number of ootheca and consolidate the species in my culture.
    3 points
  15. Substrate seems to be mainly a difference of pets vs feeders. Standard feeder containers make maximum use of vertical space with egg crates to pack a lot of roaches into a bin. That's the only function of egg crates. Zero substrate, is very easy to clean the dry frass, dead, and molts while not spending much time on the maintenance. I think of this as how people feed insectivores with the least amount of space and effort spent. Extra moisture in a bin with only paper, frass, roaches, and food can quickly lead to bacteria, fungus, pest insects, etc. On the other hand naturalistic containers with substrate, bark, leaves, branches, etc are perfectly fine. You're just replicating nature. There are hundreds of pictures of similar setups in the forum here. It's how tons more people including myself have kept reptiles for years also. The big difference is that the feeder bin i described previously isn't bio active. A little extra moisture (for short periods) in a naturalistic bin is perfectly fine when roaches are low density, and in balance. If someone thinks dirt and moisture are what kill cockroaches, there isn't much point arguing with them lol.
    3 points
  16. I'd say remember to feed and water them regularly, it may not seem like great advice but care is usually the only really important thing. I also recommend this book: https://www.amazon.com/Love-Cockroaches-Husbandry-Biology-Blattodea/dp/1616464275
    3 points
  17. Cockroaches are resilient and all, but their resistance to nuclear radiation is a bit exaggerated I think... If any animal group could be considered the "chosen ones", it's gotta be Tardigrades, those things can survive the vacuum of space and are quite radiation resistant.
    3 points
  18. Also check out Pycnoscelus surinamensis, they have rapidly consumed anything I've thrown into their bin. Tolerant of bone dry to quite literally soaking wet substrate. extremely good at aerating the soil, have yet to do further testing but so far I've found they can dig to at least 8" of substate.
    2 points
  19. I've got hatchlings! 😁 Actually found my first hatchlings a couple weeks ago, this species is a challenging one to breed, but worth it IMO, one of the most unique Ectobiids that can be found in the US! The hatchlings are SO small, about a mm long, and with very little mass to them. This one's a second instar I believe... so about 2 mms long. 😂
    2 points
  20. Thanks! I have not been out to collect much yet but I know there is great potential in the area based on what I've seen while outside wandering around. My best find has been an eyed click beetle, which had gotten into my house and was making a racket in the hallway
    2 points
  21. Not sure about @Mwewe's species, but at least some of them do also provide.....exploratory bites. 😅 They're not TERRIBLE, but shocking enough to where I've involuntarily jumped on the 1 or 2 occasions where I was bitten and hastily went back inside my house to contemplate why the bug gods had forsaken me so. 😢🤣
    2 points
  22. I've got three adult males and an adult female now! The males are much more yellowish than I expected, only a very faint green, but they also have two reddish brown stripes going down the first half of their tegmina, kinda neat. The females on the other hand lack any such markings and are definitely more green, but still very pale, with an almost silvery sheen to them. Here are some pictures, first of a male: And now here is a female: Wish me luck in breeding these beauties and getting them established in US Blatticulture!
    2 points
  23. Here is some of the color variation from my colony. Now that I have over 500+ individuals, i am prep to separate them by color/tone.
    2 points
  24. Free? Heh Heh! If I came across a good deal on the orange werneri, I might try it, but for now I'm focused on other isopods that I have better luck with.
    2 points
  25. Yes, they are very beautiful, males look like ghosts)))) It's a pity that we won't be able to communicate in the messenger, I don't know English, but I speak Spanish very badly. But we have already found a common language and even made a little friendship We also have a common acquaintance, my friend - Philip Byzov Don't you want to learn Russian?
    2 points
  26. In my collection there is a culture that we designated as Ergaula sp. Kinabatangan, Borneo, as the material was collected by one of our Russian keepers along the Kinabatangan River, in the east of Kalimantan Island (Borneo), several years ago. These cockroaches differ from the species already present in culture - E. capucina (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1893) and E. pilosa (Walker, 1868). These are smaller cockroaches, the males of which have an almost solid black (rarely with a small light spot in the middle) color, capable of rapid active flight. Females have a more prominent pronotum and sculpted surface of the first pair of wings. This material is very similar to the photographs (not typical) of the samples presented on the E. pilosa page of the site [http://cockroach.speciesfile.org/Common/basic/Taxa.aspx?TaxonNameID=1177988]. In turn, these samples are not at all similar to what we usually call in culture as E. pilosa. There are two opinions: either the site has not correctly identified the material, or what we have called E. pilosa is not. What are your opinions? Here's my sample:
    2 points
  27. In my laboratory it is 25-27 ° C during the day, and at night it drops to 22 ° C. In general, of course, the most favorable daytime temperature for all crops in general is from 30-35 C °, but I do not use heating devices due to energy savings. A friend was in the south-west of Madagascar and said that the temperature there is monstrous, the heat is unbearable, and the humidity in the area of these very thorny woodlands is practically zero, that is, it is actually a very dry desert. Where cockroaches sit, it is also dry, but at least cooler by 2-5 C °. There is no available water or food containing moisture, except for the leaves and stems of succulents.
    2 points
  28. One of the Simandoa conserfariam females brought another (already the second in the group) brood. It is difficult to count the number of individuals, but in any case there are at least twenty cubs. The nymphs of the first brood grow together, however, I want to note that they do not grow as fast as most other species. In the group, judging by the enlarged abdomens, there are still pregnant females. Separately, I would like to note that cockroaches of this species are very demanding on the presence of animal protein: they fiercely eat the corpses of their old fellow tribesmen and literally tear them apart, trying to take a piece from a neighbor.
    2 points
  29. Got new species of Peresphaerinae. These are Corydidarum magnifica, C. tarsalis, C. pygmaeus, C. sp. Japan and Bantua sp. Namibia. In some cultures there are already adults and as a result, there is every reason to expect offspring Corydidarum magnifica C. tarsalis C. pygmaeus Bantua sp. Namibia Photo by C. sp. Japan I did not publish, since they are outwardly similar to C. pygmaea.
    2 points
  30. I have two subspecies Panesthia angustipennis - P. a. cognata and P. a. angustipennis. As you know, they grow and develop for a long time, but yesterday the first imago appeared (I think that the male, but did not specifically determine the sex). There he is : What Panesthiinae do you have?
    2 points
  31. I made this out of boredom. Hope you like them.
    2 points
  32. The P Metallica has always been one of my favorite tarantulas. A couple months ago, I fulfilled my dream of owning one, and yesterday I was able to get one tattooed on me. I've been wanting this tat for years and it turned out pretty good.
    2 points
  33. My Simandoa all started to go out in adults, one pair has been in imago for several weeks already and the female is already plump. I really hope for a brood. The comrade had only two broods, despite the fact that in the first there are much less than thirty babies, and in the second there are only two. This is upsetting. But let's hope for the best In the photo, a pair of adults (male and female):
    2 points
  34. @Hisserdude wrote a great care sheet on Arenivaga spp. care. 🙂 Invertebrate Dude Caresheets: Arenivaga spp. (idcaresheets.blogspot.com)
    2 points
  35. Here's a care sheet that @Hisserdude wrote up on the species: Invertebrate Dude Caresheets: Pseudoglomeris magnifica (idcaresheets.blogspot.com)
    2 points
  36. Well, poultry feed....every variety....non-medicated, organic, non-gmo....all have DL Methionine in it. (many have Diatomaceous Earth too...another known pesticide) Poultry feed producers put it in there purposely because it makes for meatier poultry, and the birds grow faster. A read of the patent by the University of Florida clearly shows its effects on insects/larvae with an alkaline gut physiology.....this includes the cockroach. With all due respect, noting your extensive experience, line breeding for the Blaptica dubia cockroach is an urban myth. If there was any genetic diversity within the Blaptica dubia species...Mother Nature would of revealed it herself by now. I've seen with my own eyes what years of feeding nothing but Cheerios can do to the coloration of all the Dubia instars including adults. I purchased two large colonies of approximately 3000 breeding females which were fed nothing but Cheerios....when I started to feed them cat food (this was about 8-9 years ago when cat food was the go to chow ingredient) the very first generation of offspring which eventually molted into adults all became dark and glossy just like the thousands of others I had. I've also seen with my own eyes what feeding nothing but poultry feed does.....I purchased 25,000 females with the vast majority all being the size of a quarter....notice the coin in my pic for reference. Many hundreds had the blisters. The blistered roaches don't live long at all, and are predominately seen on the females. There is something I coined "white wing" disease...I used to barter supplies for other people's Dubia..."used to" being the key phrase. I seen perfectly formed wings that were white/translucent, or the perimeter of the wing if not the edge of the entire body was translucent. I attributed it to molting issues possibly due to a lack of humidity. But the nymphs never grew really, they were flat and sickly looking. The adults seem to perish prematurely also, although that was harder to determine because I wasn't getting into the breeding bins daily or cleaning them out but once every 60 days during a harvest. It got to be such a concern of mine, weeding out sickly looking roaches before selling them, that I began to quarantine all roaches' I acquired in trade. Primarily there was three people I bartered with, and one in particular really had a lot of these white wing issues. I asked her what she was feeding and she proudly proclaimed poultry feed. The other two also had some poultry feed in their chow, one also served a lot of veggies and fruits, but this woman fed nothing but poultry feed right out of the bag. The thing about DLM noted in the patent and elsewhere is that it stays in the genetics for 3 generations..one spraying and it keeps on working for 3 generations. Its really an amazing pesticide that doesn't affect the plant/fruit...it only targets the pest hence the "green" moniker. The roaches I got from this lady continued to have these issues while I bred them...and fed them poultry feed. Understand, I didn't know anything about DL Methionine at the time...I actually started to feed my own in house bred roaches poultry feed. I thought my husbandry was the issue. (even though I had been breeding for 7-8 years before acquiring these roaches) Once I became aware of the problems with poultry feed, through this large Dubia female purchase but also through this need to "manage" an inventory as my business grew...I stopped feeding poultry feed and began experimenting with other products....and the experimental ingredient list is long. In 2019 I stopped feeding poultry feed and today, finally, I don't see any blistering on my bugs...I still see some deformed wings....the key word being "deformed" which is caused by a bad molt. I attribute this to the 3 generation effect caused by DLM which has finally run its course through my colonies. I no longer accept anyone else's bugs in trade. I have actually bought bugs from other known sellers, and have seen blistering and white wing issues as they grew...which I attribute to them using poultry feed in their chow. I know it sounds crazy but I believe I can tell you who is feeding poultry feed and who is not just by looking at their roaches..... Folks tend to look for big red flags...but you would have to understand how DL Methionine works...this "green" pesticide doesn't reveal itself through a massive die off.....it primarily affects reproduction and growth rates. Breeding Blaptica dubia is my livelihood, and over the last 10 years I have done some serious experimenting. I humbly submit...until you have to manage an inventory supplying stores, breeders, reptile shows, and the internet...you really have no clue what is going on in a colony. The ol' look ma...that's a heckuva lot of bugs in there "eye ball" test doesn't reveal much. If you don't believe me take the 5k challenge....take 5,000 baby Dubia nymphs and put them in a 10 gallon sterilite...(we use 7.5)...feed them your Purina poultry feed. (if I recall one of their products is outrageously high in unnecessary protein and calcium too - their bag labeling/design is terrible you can't be sure which product you are getting) Take another 5K into a similarly sized container and feed them fresh fruits and veggies...or a dry chow like ours which contains Oat Groats, Wheat Germ, and Barley...all fit for human consumption. 30 days later count them and share your results.... Please...I sincerely want to know....what benefit do you think your roaches are receiving by feeding them poultry feed ? I'm hard pressed to think that anyone would want their critters to be fed a bug that has in essence been gut loaded with a pesticide..... There is a better way.....a healthier way.
    2 points
  37. One of them molted to L5, hooray! 😁 Some pics while it was still teneral: Now fully darkened:
    2 points
  38. Actually it's ammonia buildup because they don't bind it in uric acid but even if they understood what they were talking about they'd be wrong.
    2 points
  39. I've heard these are being cultured in Europe, such a nice species! 😍 Another hisser that will hopefully make it to the US hobby in time, hopefully they aren't too difficult to culture! Best of luck breeding them! 😁
    2 points
  40. Hello everyone, FlamingSwampert here! I just wanted to introduce myself. You may/may not know me from the Arachnoboards forum, or from many other places. I am getting into the roach hobby, so I decided to join this forum! I plan on getting many more species once it becomes warmer, but currently I only have Dubia Roaches. Other than roaches, I have a Painted Agama named Rocky, and a plethora of isopods, beetles, millipedes, and fish. I have also kept stag beetles and mantises, but all of my individuals sadly died. I love all roaches (and animals), but my favorite species are the hissers and Blaberus sp. I hope I can contribute to this forum as much as possible! Happy roaching, everyone!
    2 points
  41. Bantua sp. Namibia Corydidarum magnifica (Shelford, 1907) Corydidarum pygmaea (Karny, 1915) Corydidarum tarsalis (Walker, 1868) Hyposphaeria sp. South Africa Pseudoglomeris glomeris (Saussure, 1863) Pseudoglomeris terranea (Walker, 1871) and several more indeterminate Perisphaerus species from Southeast Asia. This is what different keepers have.
    2 points
  42. Quite excited to find a roach forum.:) Forums in general seem to be dying out :(, but there obviously still is good stuff to be found I've been keeping invertebrates of various kinds for over two decades now. My main interest are arachnids, but all arthropods are cool. My first roach was some South American species that I planned to feed to my tarantula, but it turned out to be so very cute, I simply couldn't! After that I've kept on and off a handful of different species. ATM I have only A. tessellata. I'm growing them as pets and also, if they start breeding well, to be dissected on the university animal morphology course. (Some may also end up to be fed to the spiders, but these are not exactly fast breeders, so I'll use them only if there is serious shortage of other feeder animals.) I find roaches fascinating. They are much more complex behaviourally than average people realize. I'd be superinterested to know if subsocial species of cockroaches, like Cryptocercus spp. are kept in captivity.
    2 points
  43. Therea are very interesting cockroaches, however, like all Corydiinae. T. bernhardti, T. olegranjeani live with me and relatively recently, I acquired T. regularis. So far, these are ten teenage nymphs. A very beautiful view, of course, but I like T. olegranjeani the most of them
    2 points
  44. Because of the cold weather front that has hit Macau recently, the temperature drop has made all my roach bins halt their external activity. The room is now at 20C during daytime and dropping at night to 15C. Most of the roaches are now underground or hiding. The Yamato Nymphs are congregating in two separate groups under some leaves. You can take a quick peek as I expose them to the light, on the link down below. Video Lovely yellow coloration don't you think?
    2 points
  45. I've read that fresh peanut butter will glow under a black light too! But I've yet to test it out. It seems that at least one Cubaris species will glow too: (Cubaris sp. ‘Blonde Rubber Ducky’ from dartknightexotics reddit page)
    2 points
  46. I don't think I've shared this specimen here before.
    2 points
  47. Well I've bred Myrmecophilus without keeping them with ants, so I'm hoping I can do the same with the Myrmecoblatta, we'll see. I'm throwing everything I can at them diet wise.
    2 points
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