Jump to content

All About Arthropods

Members
  • Content Count

    950
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    42

Posts posted by All About Arthropods

  1. 46 minutes ago, Homelander said:

    Do panchlora "giants" or "speckled" need daylight for a certain amount of hours during the day? I keep them in the boilerroom where its warm, but no light. Thanks!

    Nope. 🙂 I don't know of any roaches that are being bred in captivity at the moment that actually need a day and night cycle.

  2. 1 hour ago, Arthroverts said:

    Hello all, I was just checking out Roach Crossing's website, and there are signs of life on it! New species have been added! Is this a sign of Kyle's return? Has anyone been in contact with him recently?

    @All About Arthropods, @Hisserdude.

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts

    We can hope! He seems to be honing in on his business much more recently and has been responding to people's emails in a timely matter for the last couple weeks. In fact, I was in contact with him just today. :) 

  3. 8 hours ago, Homelander said:

    Thanks for the information, its greatly appreciated! The heating mat under the moist side is sufficient you think? I'm raising giant panchloras. I think I read somewhere with a different type of roach you want it on the dry side.

    Sorry, that part of your previous response went completely over my head. lol It shouldn't matter; only thing is that the moist side will dry out faster with the heat mat, so just make sure it never gets too dry. 🙂

  4. 11 hours ago, Homelander said:

    Thanks for replying :) so besides pink springtails which type of springtail would you choose if you were to restart? Also does the heat mat go on the wet side of the enclosure for giant banana roaches? Or would it be more beneficial to put the heat mat on the dry side?

    I would likely choose one of the small silver varieties, like this one here. But it doesn't matter all that much; many species should do. Some small silver springtails got into a bunch of my cultures somehow through materials I collected from outside (even though I sterilize everything) and they seem to be doing a good job, so that's really the only reason why I'd recommend them. lol I'm not sure if they're the exact same species I linked to.

  5. 45 minutes ago, Homelander said:

    Thanks for the help! What does culled mean? Should I try springtails? What kind of springtails species do well with them? 

    Culling is just removing individuals from the colony. :)

    I would definitely recommend springtails. Many species would do well with them, but I'd personally recommend against Sinella curviseta (Tropical Pink Springtail). They are extremely prolific and do a great job as a clean-up crew, but I've personally found them to be extremely annoying over time. They'll end up covering much of the total surface in your enclosure and are more conspicuous than many other springtail species because of how large they are. 

  6. 4 hours ago, Auz said:

    update: I put him out of his suffering after trying to see if I could help. 

    I know this is part of the hobby, but this is my first experience dealing with this. I was not looking forward to it. On the bright side, the rest of my small colony looks to be healthy. 

    Very sorry for the loss; I know it can be heart-breaking. :( Best of luck with the others going forward. :) 

    • Like 1
  7. 18 hours ago, BeetleShelf said:

    Hey everyone!

    My colonies have gotten to the point where I think I should start using some clean up crews. Isopods seem like the easiest option. Can I just place them in there as is and they'll clean up? Or do I need to add anything to the enclosure? 

    I honestly would always recommend springtails as a clean-up crew as opposed to isopods since they're more inconspicuous most of the time and there's no risk of them chowing down on your roaches like there is with isopods. But if you were to use them as a clean-up crew, I recommend staying away from at least Porcellio spp. (more likely to much on the roaches) and Porcellionides spp. (way too prolific). You can indeed just throw them in without any extra care besides maybe tossing in a tad of extra food each feeding.

    18 hours ago, BeetleShelf said:

    Hey everyone!

    Also, how do I tell that I need a clean up crew if I can't directly see the feces? I have a ton of G. caffrorum nymphs, and I'm wondering if they are doing their own clean up or not.

    Any advice would be appreciated!

    - Spencer

    Roaches will clean-up their own enclosures to some degree by partially-wholly consuming their own dead bodies, but don't mess with the feces at all. As to how you would know if you need a clean-up crew or not, that's hard to say. Some people show allergic reactions if waste builds up too much, but in general , the roaches themselves only really have issues if dead bodies accumulate, which can cause bacterial blooms and lead to infection (with some Epilamprids being outliers). Feces are really not much to worry about for the roaches and, in fact, I have multiple colonies of Pycnoscelus literally swimming around in their own feces right now and they're still doing magnificent. 

    • Like 1
  8. 3 hours ago, VolkswagenBug said:

    Yeah, when I started I was more interested in the big and flashy species. I keep some of those, but I also have a fascination with smaller cryptic species now.

    Exactly! The flashy stuff is good for luring people into the hobby, but once they've been hooked, it's easier to feel the fascination for nearly all species. :) 

    • Like 2
  9. 8 hours ago, BeetleShelf said:

     

     

    Awesome, thanks everyone! I was recently looking into a few other species, and I wanted to know where I could find them. I'm particularly interested in Henschoutedenia flexivitta.

    I saw that Roach Crossing sells them, but I've also heard that Kyle isn't really active anymore. Is this true?

    @Bmaines96 should have some flexivitta, but if not, you can also scroll the ad section on here. They're not extremely rare, so they pop up in lists from time to time 

    Yeah, Kyle's either online or he isn't......unfortunately he's been just about completely offline for months now.

  10. On ‎10‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 8:34 AM, OblongonotaFan321 said:

    Hi, i'm new here and to keeping roaches in general so sorry if i ask too many questions! :)

    I have 4 hissers, 2 dubias, a small parcoblatta colony and a single B. germanica as pets. I can't wait to get into other species too!

     A few of my roaches :D

     

    22574565437.jpg.ab8d490b12217854664766940e2309e0.jpg

    Welcome! 

    As @Hisserdude stated, there's no such thing as too many questions; if you ever have any, ask away! 

    Interesting to see Parcoblatta on your list so soon; they're all rather small and not "the most stunning of the stunning". I admit, I didn't really want to keep anything from the genus when I just broke in, but my eyes have been cleared and I can see the beauty and worthwhileness of keeping them now. Glad you've realized this already! :)

    • Like 1
  11. 15 hours ago, BeetleShelf said:

    Hi everyone! My name is Spencer. I'm living in Utah and studying Entomology at university right now. 

    I am raising 3 Madagascar Hissers right now, but I am really interested in moving into Domino, Question Mark, and Glowspot roaches as well. I am rearing them as pets, but potentially as feeders a few years down the road. I love roaches because of their ease and almost instant return! Beetles (I raise Goliathus goliatus and Dynastes tityus right now) are only gratifying in the long term, but my Hissers can be handled even now, and grow so fast! 

    Any recommendations on which species I should move into next?

    I prefer species that don't have wings for aesthetics and so my wife doesn't worry her brains out thinking that the roaches will fly at her haha.

    Nice to meet you all! 

    - Spencer

    Welcome! 

    Almost all adult roaches are equipped with wings (including the ones you mentioned), but not all can really use them. I recommend Peppered roaches as @The Mantis Menagerie suggested; they're large, considerably docile, and adult males can only flutter downwards slightly, no true flying ability. Polyphaga spp. are also really great; P.saussurei is the most docile roach I've ever encountered and also get's quite large!

    • Like 1
  12. 9 hours ago, Ghoul said:

    How's it looking for this species in the hobby? I love Lucihormetica, keep all 3 species currently in the hobby, and Hormetica seem like a perfect addition... once they're in Europe and established enough that the price won't tear my leg off that is, lol. 

    I know of only 3 people that have them, including myself. The others being @Bmaines96 and @Cariblatta lutea. I have not gotten my female to drop any babies yet, but I know they have; hopefully their colonies are still doing well.

    • Like 1
×
×
  • Create New...