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MooreInverts

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MooreInverts last won the day on March 23 2018

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  1. Pfffft. I should have thought that response through. I read back through the old thread and I'm Near Certain I don't even want to try my hand at fulvescens, but the latta are really appealing. They're so pretty to boot, but I'm not sure just how fast they reproduce. I think that'd be a good question to have answered. I hear that the genus can be tricky to breed because males mature and die much faster than females do, so that can be tricky, but I guess some species are worse than others? Sorry this is a little long-winded, it's confusing, especially since they're not that commonly talked about
  2. I actually made a thread about that before! While the males flight is "Eh" it seems like they don't do it readily which is a reassurance. I'll likely get P. latta one day, but I don't know if they're enough, feeder-wise. Maybe in tangent with the red goblins? I wanted P. fulvescens, but I hear they're very...panicky, or whatever adjective you want to use. In tangent with their speed, that seems troublesome. I'm not sure exactly how fast that is though. Lateralis are fast, but how do fulvescens compare? If they were cheaper, I might experiment to see how they are in person, but anecdotal eviden
  3. The addiction continues...I'm now up to five tarantulas, with four more on the way. It's not a problem though, I swear. This is a long update not for the faint of heart, so I'll break it down by species to make it easier. I'm not that funny but I hope it gets at least a smirk out of someone. (Deceased) Neoholothele incei "Gold" - First as an update, Goldfinger sadly pass away within a month of getting it. Little guy just didn't make it one day, was in a death curl and everything. I asked several people and showed pictures, and they said it wasn't anything I did wrong. I'm still dou
  4. Alright, alright...I'm still pretty damn adamant that I Do Not want to keep Blatta lateralis. They breed so much it seems downright overwhelming, and their potential pestiness really turn me off of the idea of starting a colony. However, as my tarantula collection grows (I have five right now, with four more coming in April) I start to wonder if one day there will be a necessity to start one. I know I've asked similar questions before, but I have a clearer idea of my situation now and I'd really appreciate some help. With my spiders, I'm already finding great annoyance with burrowing feed
  5. Around this time last year I got my first isopods from Captive Isopoda. I started with 20+ mixed P. scaber "Lottery ticket", a nifty idea where you get a random assortment of non-visual isopods from experimental cultures. They may or may not come with recessives for other genes, and what you get is a mystery! If you're into isolating for morphs or want a nifty display colony, these guys are great. I started with a mix of grey, dalmatian, orange, orange dalmatian, and one calico. Early on, I ended up with my first new morph, some lovely orange pieds! They're hard to get pictures of but I think
  6. Oh my goodness. Well, this is why I ask, haha!! This is REALLY good to know, thank you. How do you feel about other parcoblatta? Even if I don't use the genus as feeders, I'm really in love with their appearance, especially B. lata. Just a general opinion, I mean.
  7. That's good to know! Are they fast in general, or only when startled? I notice that the red goblins readily climb and absolutely panic if they lose their shelter. They can be darn fast when they want to or are spooked, but with lots of shelter they hardly ever climb and are pretty chill. How do parcoblatta compare to that? Does shelter help them feel calmer, or are they constantly "gotta-go-fast"?
  8. I've been revisiting my roach notes and I'm on the quest for the most ideal feeder roach to get next. I've now had some more experience with my current species and I'm starting to figure out what I like best. As my collection grows, I'll need a faster breeding species soon enough. I keep little kenyans and p. couloniana, but the former are only good for the little insectivores and the goblins don't breed fast enough for the long haul. Unfortunately, most of the options I have possess some serious negatives. Of all the species I've found though, I'm happy to say that I think fulvous wood r
  9. EHH, I wouldn't count on that! I appreciate the Summoning, but I'm afraid I'm still too much of a novice in the hobby, and I won't lie about that! I may have gotten a strong start into my hobbies (reptile keeping and horticulture, mainly. inverts of course, but not nearly as well as the other two) due to my too many years of research and talking to people, but I have a lot more to learn and I wouldn't say I know too much. Sorry!! But I won't make things up or exaggerate my experience/knowledge. c:> Still, reading this, regarding toads specifically I'm not sure, but frogs in gene
  10. Actually I don't think these show the scale of how big they really are! I know what you mean about jars like that, and one day I'll be moving them up to deli cups and later bigger jars. These things are actually REALLY SMALL, the base can fit in the palm of my hand. They're just little craft jars, I guess? I found them in the craft jewelry section of walmart. The incei is really easy to find in them, and the other two are VERY TINY and harder to see but its not impossible. I do understand what youre saying though, I've read and notice the same things, and even though the jars might b
  11. Listen, it was bound to happen someday! I already spent a good deal of time considering these, and I did already put a solid 2 years of research under my belt, and after a really cool visit to a local reptile show it looks like I have three tiny lads joining me!! Somewhat impromptu, but I am prepared and thrilled to have them. While it's hard to get pictures since they're tiny and it's really only the golden boi out and about, they're really cool and I'm so glad I have them. As positive as I can be, life has been really rough this past year, especially recently, and these hobbies really k
  12. Honestly, even though I've been interested in inverts for a good few years, I never really imagined keeping so many inverts so soon. But of course life has a way of throwing curve balls for sure! I'd like to joke "do bugs, not drugs", but admittedly invert keeping is an addiction itself. My first few bysotria rothi and my bad influence of a friend became like a gateway drug (and dealer!) into an ever-expanding collection, and it's only getting better. Here's my current list, and future acquisitions, and of course the "happy accidents" and surprises that happened along the way.
  13. Not an issue! c: I always hear mixed things, and this is the biggest concern I had, since I know in isopods at least that's exactly what happens. I'll definitely play it safe then, and maybe just get more rothi so I can have a nice roomy space for them. It has really deep substrate and I'll be adding more cork and loads of leaf litter too. My other guys LOVED that, so I'm more than happy about just that species. I'm also getting a couple sterilite latch CD box as we speak for the little kenyans, and the extra dubia. The dubia will get a bigger space in the future. c: I think this'll work
  14. Kinda mentioned in a previous post, but I figure it's best to make a proper post. I've finally upgraded my bysotria rothi to a 20 qt gasket, with very deep substrate, leaf litter, and cork bark. I used their old and favorite cork flat, with a hollow for hiding in, and I'll be adding some more pieces soon enough. Right now I only have three good-sized adult rothi* in there, and once my new springtail culture is going, I'll add some of those too. Needless to say, there's a lot of free real estate. I'm already looking into getting little kenyan roaches soon, and I know they can be cohabitate
  15. Holy crap I've never heard of that happening before...it's both awful and interesting, I wonder if you're right and their protein needs explain that. I guess they just take whatever they can, but wow that's certainly new information for me.
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