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Roachman26

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Everything posted by Roachman26

  1. I don't know about their taxonomy, but I've got a TON of them if anyone needs any. My group is very homogenous.
  2. I sure like my dubia, but they just don't breed fast enough to cover the huge demand that crickets have been filling for years. Now my B. lateralis can match the pace of any cricket producer. Holy cow, I can't feed them out fast enough. I've just started B. orientalis and they seem to be pretty quick too. The lobsters breed pretty quickly too, but they are so much harder to contain.
  3. They've done a very efficient job and started to look a little thin. There are no more escapees in that room. Now I have to leave a topless bin full of lateralis out for them. Each morning there are fewer lats than the night before and their weight is starting to look much better again.
  4. How long is forever? I got 100 nymphs in January and within weeks I had adults and egg cases. I saw no babies for nearly three months. I too thought something was wrong, but they just take a while to get going. Look out once they do. They explode! I've got over 100,000 now. I have two giant colonies in 40 gallon bins and I can't give them away fast enough. They can be measured in pounds now. The egg cases are supposed to take 20 days to hatch and they lay a new one every ten days. It seems like mine took much longer than that at first.
  5. Wow. Congrats. Thats a nice tub o' roaches there.
  6. I never noticed. I'll have to check for you.
  7. These are all my Blaberus species. They are labeled as they were sold to me. All are from four different, but very reputable sources. boliviensis: colloseus: craniifer: discoidalis: fusca: giganteus (post mortem):
  8. I've only seen about 3 or 4 babies. If there are others they are staying buried. The adults that don't die seem fine. They act normal, the food disappears, etc...
  9. Anyone know what these are? They were found eating some fungus growing on the bottom of a dead log.
  10. I remember seeing this sort of thing addressed before, but I can't remember a conclusive answer. I have 6 Blaberus species and all are doing well, except the giganteus. I started with 15 nymphs back in January and everything has seemed fine. The first few started maturing a few months ago. About half of them mature and do fine. The other half, molt into maturity and promptly die. The are perfectly formed, good size and seem perfect in every way, but dead. I have lots of vertical surface for them to molt out on and their wings look pristine, but I keep finding them dead, with their last sub-adult exoskeleton sitting somewhere nearby. There are just a handful of small nymphs running around in there, so at least one male and one female have survived and bred. The nymphs look to be second or third instar now, by my estimation. Ambient humidity is 50-60%. In their tub its 75-85%. Temp is 80-85 all the time. They are in an 18 gallon tub with two 3x6" vent holes on opposing ends of the tub. About 3" of substrate, damp in the front corner, dry in the back. They have dog kibble, fruit and water crystals available all the time. Any ideas?
  11. Hello and welcome! I spent about four months in the RSA. Loved it there. Fantastic, beautiful country. I'd love to see pics of your "tree" roaches, if you can find them again.
  12. I've got some old dead pine tree bark or I can go buy some cork bark like at a reptile store. Are either of these suitable?
  13. I think I can do that. Does anyone ever use long fibered sphagnum moss for them to crawl in and on?
  14. I removed the egg flats and added this hollowed out log. Plus its going to rain in there every day now. I'd love any tips for improvement.
  15. Is there no one who can open the lid and drop in some orange or carrot two or three times while you are gone?
  16. The oak has been laying dead in the dirt for nearly ten years. The aspen about 6. The mulberry was still upright on the tree, but dead for three years. The dead mulberry tree finally blew over. I'll look around to see if I can find something in a better state of decomposition. I'm afraid to grab something from out in the woods around here, because there is a lot of eucalyptus and I really won't be able to tell what kind of tree its from. I've got a big chunk of rotten Aspen trunk that I can use. Its the trunk of the 6 year dead tree, but it was submerged in the beaver pond. It smelled pretty rotten when I soaked it in hot water to kill any "stuff" on it. Thank you Orin.
  17. Mine seem to like to stay above ground. That's one of the things I really like about this species. Whenever I open the bin they all come out to say "hi". Unlike my L. subcinta who are beautiful, but hide all the time. Anyway, I went ahead and removed the cardboard and egg flats. It rained in decipiens world today. Here's the new and improved version: The wood is all old and weathered. Its two species of oak, mulberry, and aspen. They got some fresh plum after the pic. BTW, I found 6 babies. I'm guessing they are second instar since they are pretty small, but bigger than when I saw them right after they hatched.
  18. Mine seem to like to stay above ground. That's one of the things I really like about this species. Whenever I open the bin they all come out to say "hi". Unlike my L. subcinta who are beautiful, but hide all the time. Anyway, I went ahead and removed the cardboard and egg flats. It rained in decipiens world today. Here's the new and improved version: The wood is all old and weathered. Its two species of oak, mulberry, and aspen. They got some fresh plum after the pic. BTW, I found 6 babies. I'm guessing they are second instar since they are pretty small, but bigger than when I saw them right after they hatched.
  19. Whew! That's a relief. I thought somehow a lone lateralis got into my bin. I didn't see how that was possible,but... So I have at least one surviving E. decipiens nymph.
  20. Just got a few to turn loose in the roach room. Anyone else use "natural" methods to round up "escapees".
  21. Very good info. Thanks. I've got very old, weathered oak and aspen logs in with the giganteus, but no cypress. I can buy a bag of cypress mulch and mix that in with the giganteous. My giganteous went through a big appetite surge just as the majority were molting into adulthood, but then it slowed back down. I'll replace the egg flats with some old weathered wood for the decipiens and wet the whole thing down. Do you have any pics of decipiens babies? Does the second or third instar look anything like a lateralis? Not too worried about the L. subcincta. None of them are dying and they seem pretty healthy. Just waiting...
  22. Thanks Matt. I had heard the giganteus like it drier. To get it wetter, I'll have to remove the egg flats. I've got vertical branches in there now and I can lay some horizontally on the substrate to give them something to climb on/in. Is this what you were talking about when you hinted at the hollow log? If it gets any wetter in there it may start to mold and mildew. I'm close to that point now. If I open the vents a bit on the bins then the water will all evaporate and then the bin will just be ambient humidity. What do you think? Given all that, should I just go wetter with the giganteus and zebras? May I please have a few examples of "firm fruit". BTW, H. flexivitta are doing very well. They keep surprising me by how much food and water they consume. I'm going to have to go with bigger food dishes for them now. When I first got them a piece of kibble would last a week. Now, a dozen pieces only lasts two or three days. Any fruit is gone over night. I did a sixteenth of a large orange the other day and it was gone in two hours.
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