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Rhino roach care


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I hope to be getting a few rhino roaches sometime this year. I found a few care sheets online but they seem to be out of date and have conflicting info about substrate and feeding. I want to make sure I have the proper set up for them. Can anyone give me some good care tips for these guys?

One more question: I've read that nymphs need to stay with the mother for 4-9 months and get food from her. Is that true? Can they eat on their own before then?

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Thanks. Looks like they can be kept on a variety of substrates. I might try a peat/leaf mulch mix with some sand so they can burrow. I've read that they don't need eucalyptus leaves to survive. Have you guys found that to be true?

Didn't see an answer about the mother caring for nymphs. Anyone know about that?

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Thanks. Looks like they can be kept on a variety of substrates. I might try a peat/leaf mulch mix with some sand so they can burrow. I've read that they don't need eucalyptus leaves to survive. Have you guys found that to be true?

Didn't see an answer about the mother caring for nymphs. Anyone know about that?

Nobody really knows, and because of the rarity and price nobody seems inclined to try and find out (risking loss of specimens). It is a fact that they need to be with the mother for some length of time, but how long is unknown. Nymphs have been found in the wild with adult(s) up towards 3cm long, sometimes less. This might indicate that given thier slow rate of growth (preferring cooler temperatures) that they may be with the mother for 6-18 months. Temps in deep burrows can be 65'F while on the surface it may be in the high 80's. The amount of time spent in chambers deeper and chambers near the surface is not known, just that they go there.

I used to feed Eucalyptus leaves and have had rhinos die. Then I switched to hardwood leaves 2" thick on top of 3-4" of coco-peat, organic soil, calcium sand, and leaf compost mixed together. They rarely eat any food I put in there, just leaves and occasional nibbles on rotten wood. The tank provides one square foot of real estate per roach.

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Thanks. Looks like they can be kept on a variety of substrates. I might try a peat/leaf mulch mix with some sand so they can burrow. I've read that they don't need eucalyptus leaves to survive. Have you guys found that to be true?

Didn't see an answer about the mother caring for nymphs. Anyone know about that?

If you're not getting adults avoid substrate of any depth due to molting issues. In nature the tunnels are of a depth that collapsing isn't an issue. There's an old Invertebrates-Magazine with a great article on this species.

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Yep, That Invertebrates Magazine article is great... answered alot of questions I had.

Like everyone above, I avoid the eucalyptis leaves (I too have had some die for no apparent reasons while feeding them dried organic eucalyptis leaves). I now just add alot of dried oak leaves.

I have a substrate close to Matt K's. Coco fibre, Sand, Rotten wood & leaves mixed... about 4" or so. They tunnel through it.

Like Orin mentioned...the tunnels do collapse every now and then. I noticed that about 1/3rd of there tunnels collapsed last night...

I was really hoping for babies this year...so far, no luck. Oh well- maybe next time.

hope that heps- Graham

PS: It seems that alot of people seperate out the mother & the babies from the rest of the group. I have heard rumors of adult males eating other roach species... I've never seen any HARD evidence...I've never tried it...they're pretty slow...I really don't see them "running down" another roach... but I figured it'd be worth mentioning...

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And when you are looking at the Rhino article in Invertebrates Magazine (March 2006 Vol.5, Issue2) check out the Editor's Notes and see who requested it! :)

Its cool how many different ways people can keep an animal and have good results. I have had my Rhino since 2006 and Ive been feeding eucalyptus leaves with no trouble at all. Ive only used organic leaves meant for human consumption (as tea). Maybe I have a different species of Eucalyputs than what others can get.

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And when you are looking at the Rhino article in Invertebrates Magazine (March 2006 Vol.5, Issue2) check out the Editor's Notes and see who requested it! :)

Its cool how many different ways people can keep an animal and have good results. I have had my Rhino since 2006 and Ive been feeding eucalyptus leaves with no trouble at all. Ive only used organic leaves meant for human consumption (as tea). Maybe I have a different species of Eucalyputs than what others can get.

That would be correct. The several species that are more common on the west coast and some in Florida that are used in landscape are meant for looks and are toxic (supposedly) to people though having a friendly aroma. I have not thought of the herbal tea varieties before.... somehow assumed the same problem for all.... !!!

:blink:

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That would be correct. The several species that are more common on the west coast and some in Florida that are used in landscape are meant for looks and are toxic (supposedly) to people though having a friendly aroma. I have not thought of the herbal tea varieties before.... somehow assumed the same problem for all.... !!!

:blink:

So if you live in a climate that doesn't have them, let's say for example...Utah. Where do people get a steady supply of leaves from, or do they just not?

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That would be correct. The several species that are more common on the west coast and some in Florida that are used in landscape are meant for looks and are toxic (supposedly) to people though having a friendly aroma. I have not thought of the herbal tea varieties before.... somehow assumed the same problem for all.... !!!

:blink:

Sean, can you post a picture of the herbal tea varieties, so that i know what they look like?

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So if you live in a climate that doesn't have them, let's say for example...Utah. Where do people get a steady supply of leaves from, or do they just not?

I can (do) grow several Aussie plants in my backyard, including a few eucalyptus trees. (I keep them shrub size though). However I feed my Rhino's hardwood leaves...mostly oak, and they seem to do just fine. So I say don't bother with the euc leaves.

That being said, though, I am going to try to find the species used for tea and see if I can grow that one here. By the time I can get one, grow it, and feed it to a test subject, this whole process may take a couple years (unless I find out who sells the leaves for tea).

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The type of eucalyptus leaves I use do smell good but not as strong as the ones used in landscaping or flower arrangements. The leaves I get are from the local organic store (New Leaf Market) and are sold crushed into pieces, a little bigger than the size of crushed tea leaves.

BugmanPrice, I am sure you could order some of the organic tea type eucalyptus leaves online or I could send you some from the store I go to.

Kyuzo, it would be difficult to identify the leaves from the crushed bits but let me figure out how to use my new dig cam (that I got for Christmas!) and I will post some pics. PM me in a few days to remind me.

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