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Leaves


BugmanPrice
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I was wondering... what species of leaves does everyone like. I know that hardwoods (that have been shed for one season) are the best but as far what kinds are best is my question. Hard woods are pretty varied and I hear most people using oak or maples. There are a lot of species of oak though. Any suggestions or comments?

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I use a variety of oak leaves with equal interest on the roaches part (though at times mostly red oak because that is what is in my yard). Other leaves so not seem to get eatn with the same interest.

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My death's heads eat maple leaves, and my hissers like dandelion and wild plantain.

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What species of oak. Oaks are very diverse...does the species matter at all?

I find red/white oak consumed more readily than say... Bur oak. Bur oak seems a lot courser too.

Also, I had an idea a while back...

Would leaves be a bit more appetizing to roaches if they were dipped in apple juice and air-dried?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for everyone’s replies. We actually have many species of oak (as used in a common sense) in the United States. I can think of four of them within 100 yards of my house. It would be interesting to compare them, but I'm hypothesizing it doesn't make too much of difference but you never can tell. I'm going to try "experimenting" with a few that were mentioned and that I have access to. Thanks again everyone.

Hello,

There´s only one species of Oak, it´s Quercus rubur. There´re some other trees of Quercus genus, like Q. suber, Q. faginea, Q. ilex and Q. coccifera for example. Of course, this information is about Europe, but I think it´s ok for US.

Best regards,

Javier

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What species of oak. Oaks are very diverse...does the species matter at all?

Sorry for the late answer.

I give all kinds of oak. If they don't like it, they musn't eat it, but they always do. Most of the oak is 'european oak' , loosely translated from dutch, which is Quercus petraea and Quercus robur.

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