Jump to content

Adhesive feet-pads


OBJ
 Share

Recommended Posts

This P. vanwaerebecki was sitting on the glass partly supported by the root.

In this position it obviously showed all - including the feet.

On glass the white pads (seems to be 4 per foot) are adhesive - and quite strong, one might add.

However, they can move pretty fast if their mind is set for it, so how do they do that?

Whatever chemistry or mechanism - it has to be switched on/off all the time.

Anybody ever found an explanation to that?

normal_Princisia_posing.jpg

normal_Princisia_close-up.jpg

BR/

Ole

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On each foot pad, there are numerous hairs tipped with a glob of oil. The vacuum created by the oil and hair combination holds the insect on. When the insect moves, the foot is peeled off the surface a few hairs at a time. This is true for some beetles, and cockroaches might have a similar method. (from For Love of Insects by Thomas Eisner)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When the insect moves, the foot is peeled off the surface a few hairs at a time.
Thanks,

It gives a picture of somebody walking with Velcro under their feet. Ok - just joking.

So it is mechanical and by turning the foot in a certain angle or way the hairs will let go easily from the surface? Otherwise exhaustion would logically occur quickly for a roach this heavy.

Did somebody here use their microscope to take a picture of the hairs? Or would that require even higher magnification?

BR/

Ole

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks,

It gives a picture of somebody walking with Velcro under their feet. Ok - just joking.

So it is mechanical and by turning the foot in a certain angle or way the hairs will let go easily from the surface? Otherwise exhaustion would logically occur quickly for a roach this heavy.

Did somebody here use their microscope to take a picture of the hairs? Or would that require even higher magnification?

BR/

Ole

I have a few pictures of the tarsi close up and can get more. My microscope can only go to about 40x though, but if you'd like some pics, I'm sure one of my big hissers can spare a foot. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a few pictures of the tarsi close up and can get more. My microscope can only go to about 40x though, but if you'd like some pics, I'm sure one of my big hissers can spare a foot. :P
Zephyr,

After joining this forum for some month now I feel safe to say that 'curious' must be our middle-name! However, I would not want you to 'de-foot' one of your specimens for this sake. Maybe it could wait till one dies of old age or a weak or small male needs to go as part af the 'optimization'?

Now, bringing this subject up.... especially in my grandidieri culture there seems to be a lot of 'leg-biting' during the night - and only on females.... (Yes, you're thinking: It takes place by other species too.... :rolleyes: )

Is that a sign of stress or is it 'normal' behaviour? The culture is somewhat overcrowded, but it seems ok since they have been given many hiding-places...

BR/

Ole

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...