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ID on 3 beetles


araceae
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All carabids, dunno with the red beetle ,maybe Cyclotrachelus sp. for the second one, and Carabus sp. for the big guy. The "baby" is a mite.

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All carabids, dunno with the red beetle ,maybe Cyclotrachelus sp. for the second one, and Carabus sp. for the big guy. The "baby" is a mite.

thanks!!

I am guessing these beetles are nothing to the bug hobby? Not worth keeping and trying to breed?

:huh: why is a mite rideing the big Carabus?

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I've raised and bred the first and second species, and they were enjoyable enough and live a long time. It might be worth it to keep 'em, but unfortunately I don't think there's a market for them. The Carabus might be a Calosoma too, either way it's the most valuable.

Mites will often use big beetles to transport them, and since carabids frequent carrion, then the mites get to a good food source.

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I've raised and bred the first and second species, and they were enjoyable enough and live a long time. It might be worth it to keep 'em, but unfortunately I don't think there's a market for them. The Carabus might be a Calosoma too, either way it's the most valuable.

Mites will often use big beetles to transport them, and since carabids frequent carrion, then the mites get to a good food source.

thanks!

can you tell me what you fed them and how you cared for them?

I might keep them for a while :D

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Mine were in a large terrarium with about an inch and a half of common dirt, some thick sticks and bark, and grasses/other plants. I fed them worms and other beetle larvae. The larvae eat springtails, mites, etc.

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Since one fifth of all plants and animals is a beetle (most of them weevils) naming a species to these guys is extremely hard. There are whole families of beetles that are not represented on Bugguide.net which is a good popular resource but should not be used for conclusive ID although many people do and even putting things in the correct subfamilies often requires many, many, years of experience. I know of a PhD who studies ONE Subgenus of water beetles... that's it, which is her full time job! Even putting a correct genus towards these beetles would be very hard.

As far as the question of is something an asset to the hobby: if you are keeping something and personally learning about the animals, whether it be husbandry, diet, or even behavior, and you are having fun... go for it, it's an asset to the hobby.

Neat beetles even with their little phoretic buddy!

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Yeah, I probably wasn't perfectly accurate. So many beetles, so little time and photos.

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I’m glad you are understanding. I get people that bring me insects and if I only give them a genus name, if that, they seem really disappointed. So instead I’ve started to give them a common name I decide sounds good (we all know how much validity they carry) and usually they are fine with that… people are pretty funny.

So, have you decided to culture them?

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They are in a 2.5 gallon tank right now, idk if I am going to culture them or not, but pretty good chance I will. :rolleyes:

I’m glad you are understanding. I get people that bring me insects and if I only give them a genus name, if that, they seem really disappointed. So instead I’ve started to give them a common name I decide sounds good (we all know how much validity they carry) and usually they are fine with that… people are pretty funny.

So, have you decided to culture them?

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Wow you guys are encouraging! Nice story Bugman, I can relate!

Araceae, you may not want to have them all together if you do breed though, since the larger species' larvae will eat the smaller.

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thanks for the tip!!

I will seperate them.

when I found them they were all under the same rock huddled together tho. :blink:

Wow you guys are encouraging! Nice story Bugman, I can relate!

Araceae, you may not want to have them all together if you do breed though, since the larger species' larvae will eat the smaller.

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