Jump to content

mixed tank B.giganteus??


Recommended Posts

Anyone have much success with b. gigantens in a mixed colony tank? Have a large show tank ready and would like to have a lot of stuff going on in there. Found two great pieces of cork oak for the tank. Or if you could what would be the species you'd like to mix with them? Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

jebbewocky is currently keeping G. portentosa, B. giganteus, and H. tenebricosa together. If I recall his portentosa (only a pair?) have not produced any babies, though.

I know for certain that Panchlora sp. and Pycnoscelus surinamensis (maybe other Pycnoscelus sp.?) can be kept with B. giganteus. I'd assume that in the wild Pycnoscelus sp. are often found in close proximity to B. giganteus, seeing as both occupy caves.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

H. tenebricosa. I like this idea. My tank is tight but Panchlora would still concern me. How about Byrotria, L.subcinta, L.verrucosa? Just took a trip to the Insectarium in NOLA it was interesting some nice roach displays. Think with everyone on this sites support I can do better lol (roach wise:) My favorite display was the p.americana display a mock cabinet with cans and such something you would defienetly see in NOLA. You have a chance its worth the time and money.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, I'm keeping all three species together. The H. tenebricosa have been doing quite well--they definently are shyer than the other species, but that's OK. It just means it's more special when they DO come out.

They all seem fine--although, yes, to my knowledge the G.portentosa aren't breeding (I did just get a pair, yes), but I will point out I've been keeping them at room temp so far--and other than occasionally damping the sub I haven't been doing much for moisture. I'll be trading my tank for a larger one soonish so I'll alter some of my husbandry (and add some more portentosa) then.

I must be doing something right though--the portentosa seem content, unstressed, and the giganteus are breeding (apparently they're one of the more difficult species and all I had to do was give them deep enough substrate, cypress mulch, and wait.)

I'm really just seeing what works and having fun with it.

The B.giganteus have had at least one brood, and possibly more--I saw some smaller roaches in there, but they *might* be G.portentosa. I'm still learning and most of the pics I can find are adults. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a five species tank up and running right now. No B. giganteus though. It's B. rothi, B. discoidalis hybrids, B. craniifer (true morph), B. dubia, and A. tesselata.

My rothi and peppereds are still nymphs but the tank is doing really well and much reproduction is underway, lol.

I intermingle many species and so far I've never really had any issues. Once my breeders produce more offspring I'm going to keep ten or so of each non climin species I own in that tank for some real color and variation. Basically Blaberus, Blaptica, Archimandrita, and Eublaberus genus, but maybe I'll find something else to add later, who knows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To vfox like what you're doing but with the eublaberus genus are you concerned with there enjoyment of protein?

This is a misinterpreted observation. People see orangeheads eating each other and assume they're doing it for the protein.

When I kept a huge colony of orangeheads in my garage over the summer I was surprised that I could walk in any night and see 2-3 adults emerging. Guess what? With thousands of individuals (and a tentative feeding schedule) I never saw them attack each other.

So why do captive orangeheads eat each other... The answer is simple.

I don't know if any one else has lived in Michigan but during the summer it's muggy as hell here. The humidity gets incredibly high (possibly at or higher than the humidity in Florida.)

With all that moisture in the atmosphere the roaches I kept outside didn't lose the moisture in their bodies as easily (since the air was already saturated) and, therefore, didn't need to eat each other for what they were really after: moisture.

I think Matt K will vouch for me on this one; Feeding a diet full of fruits and veggies produces very happy, non-cannibalistic orangeheads.

Of course, you still might see some wing biting... But that's just them. lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got to gree with Kyle on his one. Eublaberus, especially the orangeheads are after moisture. I keep mine pretty damp an I've not had any issues. I just had a new male emerge recently and babies appear as well. The males wings are untouched and the babies are happy little campers. I feed oranges once a week and keep dry food and water gel available at all times. I'm sure they will nibble wings here and there but I'm far from concerned about them being a tank devourer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well living in rainforest probably never have any moisture ptoblems other then desert species. Great incite. Wanted to incorporate eublaberus in multi species cultures they're some of my favorite. Had a orangehead cricket tank accidentally for awhile,the crickets seemed to be fine roaches seemed disterbed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Just wanted to add some more info: my multi-species colony has had some losses for B.giganteus nymphs. They were pretty big ones, and just seem to have died for no reason--I've heard that happens in the best of setups though, so I doubt it had anything to do with the other species.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...