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Florida Native and Introduced Species


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Here's a List of the 38+ Species of roaches found in FL ( Native or introduced ) in no particular order. ( This list comes from a journal published in June 1990, chances are that there are many new introduced species thriving in Florida ). we ARE the Roach State B)

1) Blata Orientalis ( Oriental Cockroach )

2) eurycotis floridana ( Palmettobug, florida woods roach )

3) eurycotis lixa ( Hustler Cockroach )

4) periplaneta americana ( American Cockroach )

5) periplaneta australasiae ( Australian Cockroach )

6) periplaneta brunnea ( Brown Cockroach )

7) periplaneta fuliginosa ( Smokybrown Cockroach )

8) arenivaga floridensis ( Florida Sand Cockroach )

9) compsodes cucullatus ( hooded Cockroach )

10) Compsodes schwarzi ( schwarz's hooded Cockroach )

11) holocompsa nitudula ( Small hairy cockroach )

12) myrmecoblatta wheeleri

13) blattella asahinai ( Asian Cockroach )

14) blattella germanica ( German Cockroach )

15) cariblata lutea lutea ( small yellow cockroach )

16) cariblatta lutea minima ( least yellow cockroach )

17) chorisoneura parishi rehn

18) chorisoneura texensis ( small texas cockroach )

19) euthlastoblatta gemma ( shortwing gem cockroach )

20) ishnoptera deropeltiformis ( dark wood cockroach )

21) latiblattella rehni ( rehn's cockroach )

22) neoblattella detersa

23) parcoblatta bolliana ( boll's wood cockroach )

24) parcoblatta divisa ( southern wood cockroach )

25) parcoblatta fulvescens ( fulvous wood cockroach )

26) parcoblatta lata ( broad wood cockroach )

27) parcoblatta pensylvanica ( Pennsylvania wood cockroach ) *** believed to occur in Florida as it has been collected near Thomasville, Georgia.

28) Parcoblatta uhleriana ( Uhler's wood cockroach )

29) Parcoblatta virginica ( Virginia wood cockroach )

30) plectoptera picta ( pictured beetle cockroach )

31) plectoptera poeyi ( florida beetle cockroach )

32) supella longipalpa ( brownbanded cockroach )

33) symploce morsei

34) symploce pallens ( smooth cockroach )

35) blaberus craniifer ( Death's head cockroach )

36) blaberus discoidalis ( discoid cockroach )

37) epilampra maya ( Maya Cockroach )

38) hemiblabera tenebricosa ( broad keys cockroach )

39) panchlora nivea ( Cuban cockroach , 'Green-banana cockroach ')

40) Phoetalia pallida ( pallid cockroach )

41) pycnoscelis surinamensis ( Surinam cockroach )

42) Ischnoptera bilunata

43) ishnoptera rufa

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Wow very nice list.

I haven’t looked for all those sp yet but I have found quite a few.

There is a new species I have never seen before in the everglades.

Strange that it is missing ectobius pallidus and pseudomops septentrionalis.

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Hey Steven,

you can adding two further species:

Ischnoptera bilunata Saussure

Ischnoptera nox Hebard

Citation: Atkinson, T.H., J.R. Mangold, and P.G. Koehler. 1992. Two neotropical cockroaches of the genus Ischnoptera (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) established in Florida. Florida Entomol. 75(1): 109-115.

best regards

Ingo

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Thanks guys for the additions :)

Alex do you have any published literature where it lists ectobius pallidus and pseudomops septentrionalis as stablished in Florida? I looked for e.pallidus and it says in the USA it has been found only in Massachusetts and Michigan. And P. septentrionalis range as "Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and northern Mexico, plus a disjunct site in Alabama.

If anybody else know of any more FL species please feel free to comment on this. It's amazing that there are at least 45 species in this State.

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Hey Steven,

you can adding two further species:

Ischnoptera bilunata Saussure

Ischnoptera nox Hebard

Citation: Atkinson, T.H., J.R. Mangold, and P.G. Koehler. 1992. Two neotropical cockroaches of the genus Ischnoptera (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) established in Florida. Florida Entomol. 75(1): 109-115.

best regards

Ingo

Hi Ingo. Thanks a lot for this citation. After further research the Iscnoptera nox found in Florida was later found to be a dark morph of ishnoptera rufa. This was published in 2002.

Citation: Roth, L. M. (2002). The Cockroach Genus Ischnoptera Burmeister. Part II. Species from the United States (Blattellidae: Blattellinae). Transactions of the American Entomological Society (Philadelphia), 128(4), 345-360.

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I have read before that P. septentrionalis is native to northern FL. can't remember where :huh:

I personally collected what I belive to be a Ectobius Pallidus out in the cypress forest.

there is also down in keywest Blaberus Gigantus living in the trash dumps. I haven't gone there yet.

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I have read before that P. septentrionalis is native to northern FL. can't remember where :huh:

I personally collected what I belive to be a Ectobius Pallidus out in the cypress forest.

there is also down in keywest Blaberus Gigantus living in the trash dumps. I haven't gone there yet.

We'll go and get some of those species and send samples to Dr.G.B Edwards ( Co-Coordinator, Florida Arthropod and Arthropod Pathogen Introduction Committee ) and maybe it'll get added to a future revision of the Introduced species of Florida. They'll be able to determine wether they are indeed those species and make it official ;)

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Wish I could get my hands on these species in the wild.laugh.gif

If ever they are around here. sad.gif

35) blaberus craniifer ( Death's head cockroach )

36) blaberus discoidalis ( discoid cockroach )

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Wish I could get my hands on these species in the wild.laugh.gif

If ever they are around here. sad.gif

35) blaberus craniifer ( Death's head cockroach )

36) blaberus discoidalis ( discoid cockroach )

That's life. I wish I could get half the species you can around Philippines :rolleyes:

oh and even though they occur here those two species are almost impossible to find. It'll probably take many days to find a location where they live and most of those locations are either on State parks or Garbage dumps that are closed to the public :blink:

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