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It seems like every time I get anything moist I get these yellow mites! It's been happening for quite some time and I always just assumed they were grain mites. Almost identical mites swarm in all of my house plant pots with sphagnum moss though, so I'm led to believe they are all the same type and are originating in the sphagnum. I just cleaned my largest roach enclosure less than a month ago, and it's already re-infested.

Is there any good way to control these mites? In my house plants, I've watched them drown in pesticide (all natural or nasty chemical), then stand up and walk away when the liquid dries. They are mighty and resilient! If I microwaved or froze the sphagnum before using it, could it help this problem? I've got this issue in pretty much all of my humid enclosures and potted plants. They are not damaging the plants or exhibiting any sort of destructive behavior. I've had the pest expert at the plant nursery look at them, and he wasn't of much help. :huh:

I guess they kind of look like this like grain mites from the pictures I've found... I've tried predator mites them at great expense and no effect!

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Mites are one of those things that you just need to deal with when you have tropical enclosures and moist substrate/food. That being said however doesn't mean you can't greatly damage their numbers. One method is to wipe the enclosure walls in rubbing alcohol...obviously with the intended residents in a separate holding tank until it dries. Doing this once a week will keep their numbers low.

Another and much more permanent method in my opinion is to use Isopods. They compete with the mites for the same food sources and will likely greatly reduce their numbers. You can also try springtails but I find Isopods to work better. If all else fails just replace the moss with Cocofiber, they are easier to deal with on a dirt like substrate than a mossy one.

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Mites are one of those things that you just need to deal with when you have tropical enclosures and moist substrate/food. That being said however doesn't mean you can't greatly damage their numbers. One method is to wipe the enclosure walls in rubbing alcohol...obviously with the intended residents in a separate holding tank until it dries. Doing this once a week will keep their numbers low.

Another and much more permanent method in my opinion is to use Isopods. They compete with the mites for the same food sources and will likely greatly reduce their numbers. You can also try springtails but I find Isopods to work better. If all else fails just replace the moss with Cocofiber, they are easier to deal with on a dirt like substrate than a mossy one.

Well, the main substrate is already cocofiber, I am using moss for increased humidity and also watering the insects. I've been raising two kinds of isopods in every tank they'll survive in for a year or so now... I guess I'm doing what I can! I'll try the alcohol thing soon as well. Thanks! :D

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