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Need pictures of Parcoblatta species


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  • 2 weeks later...

The female died... :( The other day her right antenna broke and today I found her dead. I think she was Shelfordella lateralis.

Shelfordella lateralis picture from bugguide.

http://bugguide.net/.../758518/bgimage

Pictures of her I took just now. I cannot understand how I could just put a Red Runner in the container and forget about it. Maybe I did catch her outside? I have not caught anything like this close to our house where I keep Shelfordella lateralis.

9129403_orig.jpg

How did I not notice the Dorcus brevis in this pic? lol

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Yeah, I had two female Dorcus brevis. That one did not lay an egg and just died unfortunately. :(

Sorry to hear that :(

Seems that these guys are really hard to breed unless you provide Quercus alba with white fungi on them. Also, a friend of mine and I had some mysterious die-offs of L3 brevis :(

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Yeah, the other female I had laid eggs in a few oak branches that grew the white fungus. I do not know if they are living. I dug through one hole the female made in the wood and I found a L1 larva and unintentionally killed it. I am getting more logs so I can breed stag beetles or rhino beetles next year if I catch more.

Are you breeding the Dorcus brevis?

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Yeah, the other female I had laid eggs in a few oak branches that grew the white fungus. I do not know if they are living. I dug through one hole the female made in the wood and I found a L1 larva and unintentionally killed. I am getting more logs so I can breed stag beetles or rhino beetles next year if I catch more.

Are you breeding the Dorcus brevis?

Hope you have lots of larvae doing well in the log :)

and yes, I'm currently working on breeding D. brevis right now. I had some bad results this year so I only have a single L3 larva but I'll be getting more adults soon so hopefully, I'll succeed in breeding them this year. I even got some shitake logs for them.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Substrate looks way to dry when you touch it your fingers should be moist, the leaves and bark should be moist too. They like fruit like apple and banana and they like romaine lettuce and cat or dog food. But main diet is dead leaves and bark other stuff is like treats to them.

They do fine without the dead leaves or wood but I have only kept them for a short time. I think they eat the fungus growing on the leaves and wood. Pycnoscelus though might actually eat the wood with fungus. Some Parcoblatta species might be able to live in a dry habitat. The Parcoblatta uhleriana die when it is dry and they like it moist.
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The first adult Parcoblatta molted today and looks like a male P. virginica. It was in a small container so it's wings did not form properly but not too bad. I looked in a patch of leaves today and found two P. uhleriana oothecae and one P. bolliana nymph and one nymph that might be P. virginica. They were all in not so thick leaves with not much white fungus at all so there were not many roaches.

Pictures.

What I think are P. uhleriana oothecae.

3633718_orig.jpg

P. bolliana. Possibly L2.

7707775_orig.jpg

Maybe P. virginica.

5668529_orig.jpg

I also found this big spider in the leaves, probably hibernating or maybe to be more specific "diapause".

Looks similar to:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/2356447787702_orig.jpg

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They do fine without the dead leaves or wood but I have only kept them for a short time. I think they eat the fungus growing on the leaves and wood. Pycnoscelus though might actually eat the wood with fungus. Some Parcoblatta species might be able to live in a dry habitat. The Parcoblatta uhleriana die when it is dry and they like it moist.

I totally agree. Leaves and woods aren't the requirements for breeding this species as they do fine with fish flakes and fruits.

Some species in this genus seem to prefer dry habitat. My first P. lata culture I had, for example, got wiped out when I kept them too damp. The ones I kept in dry habitat did fine though.

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My first generation of P. uhleriana are still growing. I have not kept them with a heater until a few weeks ago. Also my other Parcoblatta species are taking a long time to grow. The Parcoblatta I have might not be getting the proper nutrition they need (I don't know).

P. uhleriana pictures.

1557337_1453575618198063_151079823_o.jpg

1548189_1453575674864724_2049159042_o.jpg

1606343_1453575698198055_2136407959_o.jpg

1490632_1453575764864715_958831912_o.jpg

1602145_1453575798198045_784666292_o.jpg

1548215_1453575884864703_1621957105_o.jpg

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