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Need pictures of Parcoblatta species


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Parcoblatta bolliana. Actually there were more than I thought (they must have been hiding well in the dirt). I found some in the container with most of the P. bolliana oothecae so some of those hatched. The P. virginica dominated in that container.

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Wow, very interesting! So, the P. pennsylvanica in the north were kept in good conditions when they did not molt to adult with not cold time? P. virginica and other species of roaches here might not be so cold tolerant. I kept them out for over a week and it got colder (I kept them in a small container). I also had two male I. deropeltiformis in there. They are all dead today. But that was only one P. virginica.

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Wow, very interesting! So, the P. pennsylvanica in the north were kept in good conditions when they did not molt to adult with not cold time? P. virginica and other species of roaches here might not be so cold tolerant. I kept them out for over a week and it got colder (I kept them in a small container). I also had two male I. deropeltiformis in there. They are all dead today. But that was only one P. virginica.

That's what Kyle told me and it takes couple of generations to get rid of this diapause requirement.

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Ones of the two I. deropeltiformis nymphs was actually alive and healthy. The other was sub-adult and seems dead. The sub-adult could have died from starvation. I did not see him eat and he was skinny but he was in a container with food for probably over a week before I put him outside to slow his growth down.

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The sub-adult male P. virginica I put out in the 20th was dead yesterday (it went down to 15 degrees). He was one of the captive bred ones. But he survived the other nights (so I think that night killed him). They might need to get used to getting cold.

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But I put another male (pre-sub?) out last night (about 9 degrees) and today he was fine. He was a wild caught one. Also I put a piece of wood that he was in when I took him out of his container from a warm room. I do not want to put them out anymore until I breed really many.

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I'm keeping a colony of about 16 or so P. Pennsylvanica inside for the winter to see if they mature or not by summer. Most of them are sub adults. Just curious if it'll work. Last time I left mine out on my back porch (which is built in but not heated) they all died within two weeks.

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At room temp in a container with Cocofiber substrate, oak leaves, and rotten wood.

Can you take a picture of the setup? Can you test the P. pennsylvanica by putting two or so in different containers with no wood but egg crates with some moister from mist? Or use just cocofiber?
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I'm using small piece of egg flat as a hide for them. But I'd suggest using rotten wood as a food source because that's what they eat as part of their diet in the wild.

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I'm using small piece of egg flat as a hide for them. But I'd suggest using rotten wood as a food source because that's what they eat as part of their diet in the wild.

Do you mean Parcoblatta generally or Parcoblatta pennsylvanica specifically? The wood often grows mold that kills my roaches so I would try without it a little. I think P. virginica eat wood because they live in tunnels in rotting wood but the other species like P. uhleriana I think eat a white fungus they are always around. And I wonder about P. bolliana eating ant larvae (just wondering). Because I always find them around ant houses and Cariblatta's P. bolliana seem predacious.
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Well I keep my P. pennsylvanica with the wood mixed into the substrate so I'm not worried about the mold. The other species are kept the same way but without the egg crate, just cork bark as a hide instead. I'm not sure about the other species specific diets but I've never had an issue with feeding any of them occasional dog food and apples with this substrate and setup.

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Well I keep my P. pennsylvanica with the wood mixed into the substrate so I'm not worried about the mold.

Mold does not grow under the substrate? Well, if you keep the wood like that then the P. pennsylvanica can't get to it.
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  • 3 weeks later...

Sorry, I didn't know that Parcoblatta dug. I probably caught some P. pennsylvanica a few days ago and two P. divisa I think (one male and one likely female) in two pine tree stumps. The roaches were only in the dry spots of the stumps. The stumps were both over 6 feet tall.

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